Driwan Rare Book cybermuseum:”The Rare Islamic manuscript”

 

 

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

     WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM               

  SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

                    

(Museum Duniamaya Dr Iwan)

 

                    Please Enter

                   

              DIC SHOWROOM

(Driwan Art  Cybermuseum)

Showcase:

The Rare Book Collections (koleksi Buku Langka)

Frame : The Rare Islamic Manuscript(Koleksi Buku Langka Islam Dengan ilustrasi danTulisan Tangan kaligrafi)

 


 

Islamic manuscripts uniquely mirror the civilization that produced them. The entire gamut of learning can be seen in these pages, from grammar, literature, and poetry to theology, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. The Islamic manuscripts shows not only the beauty and variety of Islamic calligraphy, illuminatiions and painting, but also the extreme care various artisans took in penmanship, binding, and papermaking. These colorful illuminations and miniatures transcend time and place, providing a window into pre-twentieth-centry Islamic culture.

 

 

 

Click to see larger image.
 

Ijazah [License, Authorization, Certificate, Permission], given by Abu Muhammad al-Dhihni ‘Uthman Nuri al-Hanafi al-Miyawardi to his student ‘Umar Lutfi ibn al-Hajj Muhammad Hilmi known as Munla Isma’ilzadah al Arkhawi. 4 Jumada al-Akhirah 1312 H / 3 Dec. 1894.

 

Each teacher enumerates his own teachers and what he studied with them. Both manuscripts are written in clear nasta’liq script in black ink on yellowish paper, the later manuscript with keywords in red ink. Sentences are separated by gold disks and the pages are ruled in gold and colored ink. The opening page of the later manuscript has a handsome heading in gold, red, and blue. Folio 12a contains some rubrics in gold. The manuscript fits loosely within a contemporary cloth binding. The opening page of the earlier manuscript has a handsome heading in gold, red, and blue. The opening two pages are surrounded with a vignette arabesque design in gilt. Folio 10a contains some rubrics in gold. Contemporary board binding with leather spine. The teachers’ seals appear at the very end of the certificates. In Arabic.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Two Manuscripts in Persian & Arabic. Ramadan 1307 H / April/May 1890.

 

1. Sharh-i Bist Bab dar Ma’rifat-i A’mal-i al-Asturlab (Commentary on “Twenty Chapters Dealing with the Uses of the Astrolabe” of Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, 1201-74, by Mulla ‘Abd al-‘Ali Parchadi. Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, who built the famous observatory in Maraghah (Azarbayjan, Iran) for the Mongol leader Hulagu (grandson of Chingis Khan), was one of the most brilliant minds and the scholar par excellence of the Middle Ages.
2. Hadha Lughz min al-Shaykh (This is a Riddle from the Master). A short mathematical treatise in the form of a riddle. al-Shaykh, the “Master,” could well be al-Shaykh Baha’ al-Din al-‘Amili (1547-1621), who is know to have had a great interest in mathematics. Copied by Mulla ‘Abd al-‘Ali Parchadi, whose identity could not be ascertained.

 


Kitab-i Shahidi [The Book of Shahidi], by al-Mawlawi al-Mughli. Undated, but probably 18th century.

 

A collection of poems in Ottoman Turkish (i.e. Turkish in Arabic script). The manuscript is written in clear and elegant naskhi script in black ink on white paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. The poems are framed in gold, the pages ruled in red line. A floral design in gold and color has been added on folio 2a and a miniature of an Indian smoking a water pipe. A handmade silver plate on the front cover depicts two cranes among shrubs, with the title of the manuscript in Kufi c script at the top. The author could be the Turkish Sufi poet Shahidi Ibrahim Dede (1470- 1550), who was born in Mugla (Turkey). Most likely a unique manuscript.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Amulet, most likely from the 19th century.

 

The manuscript, which contains verses from the Koran and invocations is written on a long scroll of vellum placed in a silver hexagonal tube with a cap. Three loops for a chain allow the amulet to be worn as a necklace. The amulet is written in a long central column surrounded by eight colored rectangular compartments. The central part is written in black ink in ruq’ah/ naskhi script, while the compartments are in large thuluth script. The central column contains Surat al-Qadr “The Chapter of Power (ch. 97),” in reference to “Laylat al Qadr” (The Night of Power) in which the Koran was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad, and falls on the 27th of Ramadan. This is followed by Surat al-Fatihah “The Opening Chapter” (ch. 1), followed in order by a long invocation asking God for help and guidance, the famous Shi’i invocation of ‘Ali (the first imam) and a magic square. All texts are ruled in gold. All these verses and invocations are meant to have magical powers to protect the owner of this colorful amulet. The compartments contain an elaborate invocation asking God to protect the bearer of the amulet. In Arabic.

 


Ijazah [License, Authorization, Certificate, Permission], given by Abu Muhammad al-Dhihni ‘Uthman Nuri al-Hanafi al-Miyawardi to his student ‘Umar Lutfi ibn al-Hajj Muhammad Hilmi known as Munla Isma’ilzadah al Arkhawi. 4 Jumada al-Akhirah 1312 H / 3 Dec. 1894.

 

Each teacher enumerates his own teachers and what he studied with them. Both manuscripts are written in clear nasta’liq script in black ink on yellowish paper, the later manuscript with keywords in red ink. Sentences are separated by gold disks and the pages are ruled in gold and colored ink. The opening page of the later manuscript has a handsome heading in gold, red, and blue. Folio 12a contains some rubrics in gold. The manuscript fits loosely within a contemporary cloth binding. The opening page of the earlier manuscript has a handsome heading in gold, red, and blue. The opening two pages are surrounded with a vignette arabesque design in gilt. Folio 10a contains some rubrics in gold. Contemporary board binding with leather spine. The teachers’ seals appear at the very end of the certificates. In Arabic.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Firman [Sultan's Order]. 25 Jumada al-Ula 1314 H/1 Nov. 1896.

 

This Firman, written in Ottoman Turkish (i.e. Turkish in Arabic script), was issued by the Ottoman Sultan Abd al-Hamid II (reigned 1876-1909) on the 25th of Jumada al-Ula 1314 H (1 Nov. 1896) to appoint a certain Sufi Shaykh as an imam (prayer leader) to a mosque in Istanbul. The document bears the Tughra (Sultan’s Signature) in gold. The single leaf (55.5 x 81 cm.) consists of 6 lines written in alternating black and red ink in diwani script.

 


Qur’an [Koran]. Undated, but probably copied in the 18th century.

 

Chapters from the Koran in beautiful, large Chinese Arabic script, in black ink on white glossy paper. The text is vocalized throughout with Koranic recitation markings in red. All chapter headings are written in red ink. The opening two pages are illuminated in gold, blue, green, red, and other colors. The last page is also illuminated and the text is ruled in two red lines. This undated manuscript was probably copied in the eighteenth century. Bound in contemporary morocco, wallet style with a flap, in the Islamic manner. Covers embossed with central medallions; borders, with a floral design. Chinese manuscripts of the Koran are extremely rare.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Tahrir Tanqih al-Lubab Sharh [Commentary on the Edition of the Revision of the Essence], by Abu Yahya Zakariya ibn Muhammad al-Ansari (1423-ca. 1520). 26 Safar 1152 H/3 June 1739.

 

“al-Lubab fi al-Fiqh” [The Essence of Jurisprudence] by Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn al-Mahamili (d. 1024) was later summarized by Ahmad ibn ‘Abd al-Rahim ibn al-‘Iraqi (1361-1423) under the title “Tanqih al-Lubab” [Revision of the Essence]. This was abbreviated by al-Ansari as “Tahrir Tanqih al-Lubab” [Edition of the Revision of the Essence]. The present manuscript (most likely unique) is al-Ansari’s commentary on his own abbreviation of the book. The manuscript is written in clear naskhi script on white glossy paper, the original text in red, the commentary in black ink. There are numerous marginal notes in different hands. There are several marginal circular stamps, which read: “This book belongs to al-Sayyid ‘Abd al-Baqi al-Bakri, 304.” The number undoubtedly refers to the year 1304 H (1886). There are also several marginal rectangular stamps, which read: “Oh Lord! You are Allah. Make it easy for us to know the meaning of ‘There is no god but Allah.’ This book is dedicated to the Almighty God by al-Sayyid ‘Abd al- Baqi al-Bakri al-Siddiq Sibt al-Husayn.” Original tan morocco binding, with a flap in the Islamic tradition of bookbinding, where all fascicles are loose within the binding. In Arabic.

 


A Collection of Illuminated Arabic Manuscripts. Undated, but probably copied in the late 18th century.

 

1. Names of God written within gold squares.
2. The name of the Prophet Muhammad.
3. A prayer for seeking God’s forgiveness.
4. An explanation of the noble seal of God.
5. The seal itself, written in large thuluth script.
6. The word “Allah” written within a crescent moon surrounded by a decorative rectangle in gold and blue.
7. The word Muhammad, written in similar fashion.
8. The hilyas (attributes) of Adam, within a circle surrounded by a decorative rectangle in gold and blue.
9. The hilyas (attributes) of Noah, Muhammad, Abu Bakr, ‘Umar, ‘Uthman, ‘Ali, Hasan, Husayn.
10. The names of: Abu Bakr, ‘Umar, ‘Uthman, ‘Ali, Talhah, Zubayr, ‘Abd Allah, ‘Abd al-Rahman, ibn ‘Awf, Sa’d, Sa’id, Abu ‘Ubaydah, Hasan, Husayn (famous companions of the Prophet Muhammad) within decorative circles as before.
11. The Seven Sleepers and their dog (Qutmir). Koran: Surat al-Kahf Chapter 18.
12. A prayer written in the form of cypress.
13. Different muhrs (Seals): Ya hannan, Ya mannan (Oh, merciful, Oh generous); wa-hwa ‘ala kull shay’ qadir (And He is able to do anything); unity of God; shifa’ al-Qur’an (Koranic medicine); seals for a prayer of getting well and for the great prayer of getting well; the seal of the Prophet; the seal of Sulayman (Solomon); explanation of the seal of the Sixth Shi’i Imam, Imam Ja’far [al-Sadiq] (died 148 H/765); the Almighty Seal, all within decorative circles.
14. Drawings: The Hand of Fatimah, Dhu al-Fiqar (‘Ali’s sword); foot of the Prophet Muhammad; the Prophet’s shoes; tawkaltu ‘ala Allah (I rely upon God); the staff of Moses; an Ax; a rose; the banner of gratitude; the cloak of the Prophet Muhammad, his rosary, his ewer, and his basin, all drawn in gold.
15. Decorative sketches of Mecca and Medina, in gold and other colors.
16. A prayer for attaining al-Maqam al-Mahmud (The Glorious Station [in heaven]).
17. Various Islamic flags, all drawn in gold.
18. Various prayers for variety of occasions.
19. Various talismanic numerological squares. Bound in contemporary brown morocco, in the Islamic, wallet-style, both covers richly gilt, with central medallion on both sides.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

A Collection of 13 Arabic Manuscripts. Undated, but probably copied in the late 18th century.

 

1. Kitab al-Dumu’ [The Book of Tears]. Dated 1181 H/1767, by Ibn al Jawzi, Abu al-Faraj ‘Abd al Rahman ibn ‘Ali (d. 597 H./ 1200) Also known as “Bahr al-Dumu’ [The Sea of Tears].
2. Kitab fi al-Ayyam wa-al-Layali wa-al-Shuhur [A Book about Days, Nights, and Months], by Ibn al Jawzi, Abu al Faraj ‘Abd al Rahman ibn ‘Ali (d. 597 H./ 1200). Also known as “Kitab al-Nur fi Fadail al-Ayyam wa-al- Shuhur [The Book of Light Regarding the Virtues of Days, and Months].
3. Kitab Adab al-Akl [Book of Etiquette of Eating], by Ibn al-Jawzi, Abu al Faraj ‘Abd al Rahman ibn ‘Ali (d. 597 H./ 1200). An unrecorded work, probably a unique manuscript.
4. Kitab Adab al-Nikah [Book of the Etiquette of Sexual Intercourse], by Ibn al-Jawzi, Abu al Faraj ‘Abd al Rahman ibn ‘Ali (d. 597 H./ 1200). The manuscript was copied by Muhammad ibn ‘Ali al-Hassani in the year 1181 H/1767. An unrecorded work, most likely a unique manuscript.
5. Tanwir al-Ghabash fi Fada’il al-Sudan wa-al-Habash [Clearing the Darkness Regarding the Virtues of Blacks and Abyssinians], by Ibn al-Jawzi, Abu al Faraj ‘Abd al Rahman ibn ‘Ali (d. 597 H. / 1200). Copied by Muhammad ibn ‘Ali al-Hassani and completed during Dhu al-Hijjah 1181 H/ April 1768.
6. A chapter from an anonymous book, probably by Ibn al-Jawzi, beginning Bab al-‘Aql Hujjat Allah ‘ala Khalqih [Chapter Concerning the Mind as Proof for the Creatures about the Existence of God].
7. Quotations from al-Hasan ibn Mas’ud al-Yusi (d. 1102 H/1691) regarding the prayer for Prophet Muhammad.
8. An answer given by al-Hasan Ibn Mas’ud al-Yusi comparing reading the Qur’an with other prayers. Copied by Muhammad ibn ‘Ali al-Hassani.
9. A quotation from Abu Bakr al-Mutawwa’i, about prophets and saints.
10. A Prayer.
11. A short poem dealing with when one does not have to return a greeting.
12. Excerpts from Tuhfat al-Albab fi ‘Aja’ib al-Buldan [Gift to the Intellects Regarding the Wonders of Countries]. An unrecorded work.
13. Excerpts from Hayat al-Hayawan [Life of Animals], by Muhammad ibn Musa al-Damiri (d. 808 H/1405).

 


Zij Gurgani [Zij Jurjani = Gurgani Astronomical Tables]. 1193 H/1779. An anonymous Arabic and Ottoman Turkish manuscript of astronomical tables written for the Ottoman Sultan Abd al-Hamid I (1725-89; reigned 1774- 89).

 

The manuscript was completed, in the year 1193 H/1779. Written in clear, small naskhi script, in black ink on white paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. No reference can be found to this manuscript. It is probably unique. The term “Zij-i Gurgani,” i.e., a Gurgani Zij, is derived from the word “Gurgan,” a title used by the Mongol leader Timur (1336-1405). It was originally invented by the Persian astronomer Ulugh Beg (1394-1449), the most outstanding astronomer of the medieval times. His tables served as the basis for many similar works, and were even used by John Flamstead (1646-1719), the first Royal Astronomer at the Greenwich Observatory. Ulugh Beg’s work held sway for close to three centuries, until it was supplanted by telescopic data.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Talisman. 1267 H / 1850.

 

This elaborate talisman is written in clear naskhi script in black ink on white paper with keywords in red, by the calligrapher Muhammad Rasim, a student of Muhammad Dhakir, known as Hafi z al-Qur’an (Memorizer of the Koran). The following sentences, written in red and repeated ten times, are interspersed in the text: “Our enemies will not reach us through spirit or other means. They have no power to inflict harm on us under any circumstances.” The opening page has a handsome heading in gold, blue, and other colors, and there are marginal medallions in gold, blue, and other colors. The contemporary blue wrapper is hand decorated in gilt. In Arabic.

 


Kitab thabit fi Ahkam al-Buyu’ [Authoritative Book on the Laws of Sales]. Anonymous.

 

Undated, but most likely was written in the early part of the 18th century. In thick and somewhat large nasta’liq script in black ink with headings, keywords and markinks in red ink on yellowish paper. 97 folios. It appears that the last leaf is missing. Recent imitation leather, numerous worm holes, causing the loss of many letters and few words, some foxing and damp staining, but the text is quite legible.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Futuh Afriqiya [The Conquests of Africa]. Book I, by Muhammad ibn Umar al-Waqidi (747-823). 1 Shaban 1083 H / 21 Nov. 1672.

 

One of the earliest works on the Islamic conquests in Africa, written in clear maghribi script in brown ink on yellowish paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. It appears that the first ten leaves were lost and replaced in a different hand. The present manuscript is significantly different from the printed version. It was copied by Ahmad ibn Ibrahim of Bani Salih, who completed it on 1 Sh’ban 1083 H/21 November 1672. In Arabic.

 


Arabic Manuscripts with Interlinear Javanese Translation in Arabic Script. Undated, but probably 18th century.

 

Arkan al-Islam [The Pillars of Islam]. The pillars of Islam are five: Confession of the Faith, Prayer, Fasting (during the month of Ramadan), Making the pilgrimage to Mecca, and Giving alms to the poor. Fima Yajibu Ta’allumuhu wa-Ta’limuhu wa-al-‘Amal bi-hi lil-Khass wa-al-‘Amm [What One Must Learn and One Must Teach and Follow Privately and Publicly] The Arabic parts of the manuscript are written in different hands in black ink in naskhi script, 7 and 8 lines to a page respectively. The entire manuscript is written on the unusual Indonesian paper called Daluang, which is manufactured from the bark of a certain native tree, called saeh. No reference could be found for the two titles; these are likely unique copies.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

A Collection of Twelve Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish Manuscripts. Undated, but probably 17th-19th centuries.

 

A voluminous collection containing mostly prayers, talismanic, mystical, and medico-magical texts. 1. Chapters from the Koran. 2. A Persian manuscript with Shi’i content. 3. Du’a’ Rasul Allah al-Ma’ruf bi-Alf ism wa-ism Allah ta’ala, wa-huwa al-Jawshan al-Kabir [Supplication of The Messenger of God (Muhammad), which is known as 'The One Thousand Names and the Name of God, Which is the 'Great Shield (i.e. Talisman)']. 4. Sharh Du’a’ al-Marjanah [Explanation of the Prayer of al-Marjanah (the Coral)]. In Ottoman Turkish. 5. Hadha Du’a’ al-Ghasilah [This Is a Prayer of the Washer Woman]. The prayer, meant to implant love in the heart of the desired person, contains a few magic squares. In Arabic. 6. A prayer in Ottoman Turkish. 7. Awwal Du’a’ Sharif [The First Noble Prayer]. In Arabic. 8. A prayer in Ottoman Turkish. 9. A prayer in Arabic against measles. 10. A prayer in Ottoman Turkish. 11. A short Turkish treatise entitled Khawass al-Qur’an [The Properties of the Koran]. 12. Hadha Hirz al-Tabi’ah [This Is the Talisman of the Female Follower]. An elaborate Talisman, beginning with a description of the cursed woman and ending with a sketch of her. The talisman is meant to protect the person who carries it from the wrath of this cursed woman. The manuscript is written in different hands in naskhi script in black ink on yellowish paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. Bound in recent tooled, gilt, green morocco.

 


[Collection of Three Manuscripts in Arabic and Javanese] / by Anonymous.

 

1. ‘Ilm wa-Ma’rifah [Knowledge and Perception]. A philosophical treaties in the form of question and answer, in Arabic with many glosses and marginal notes in Javanese (folio 2b-51b)
2. Bahjat al-‘Ulum fi Sharh Bayan ‘Aqidat al-Usul [The Delight of Knowledge in Explaining the Elucidation of the Fundamentals of Faith]. Anonymous. A commentary in Arabic with interlinear partial translation in Javanese on Bayan ‘Aqidat al-Usul [Elucidation of the Fundamentals of Faith] of Abu al-Layth al-Samarqandi, Nasr ibn Muhammad (d. 983?) a basic extensive treatise on Islam (folio 52b-86a).
3. Commentary on “al-Furud al-Wajibah” (Obligatory Religious Duties). An anonymous. A Shafii treatise on Islamic law. The original is in Arabic, written in red, with interlinear partial translation in Javanese written in black ink (folio 87b-149b) The entire manuscript (151 folios) is written on the unusual Indonesian paper, called Daluang which is manufactured from the bark of a certain native tree called saeh. Undated, but probably 18th century.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Hayat al-Qiddis Mar Afram al-Suryani [The Life of Saint Ephrem the Syrian] (303-373), an anonymous text translated from Syriac into Arabic by Butrus Rizq al-Andari (a student at Madrasat Dayr Mar Yuhanna Marun [Kafr Hayy, Lebanon] (The School of the Monastery of Mar Yuhanna Marun). 17 Jan. 1895.

 

Written in clear ruq’ah script, in purplish ink, this manuscript was completed at the monastery on 17 January 1895. Christian manuscripts of this nature, even though late, are quite rare. There is no information about the original Syriac text from which the Arabic translation was made.

 


A Collection of Thirteen Arabic and Persian Manuscripts. 1710?

 

This voluminous manuscript of 126 folios contains 12 Arabic and Persian manuscripts by different authors on various subjects. 1. Qisas al-Anbiya [Stories of the Prophets] by Sa’id ibn Hibat Allah al-Rawandi (d. 1178). In Persian. 2. ‘Iqd-i Nikah [Marriage Contract] by Muhammad ‘Ali Astarabadi. In Persian. 3. [Short Quotations from Various Religious Sources]. In Arabic and Persian. 4. [Medical Recipes], attributed to Jafar al-Sadiq (702?-65 or 6), the 6th Shi’i Imam. In Persian. 5. Taqwim al-Muhsinin fi Ma’rifat al-Sa’at wa-al-Ayyam wa-al-Shuhur wa-al-Sinin [Calendar of the Benefactors in Knowing the Hours, the Days, the Months and the Years] by Muhammad ibn Murtada al-Kashani al-Akhbari (d. 1703 or 4); an astrological work culled from the works of the Shi’i Imams. In Arabic. 6. Risalah fi Tahrim Dhaba’ih Ahl al-Kitab [An Epistle on the Prohibition of Animals Slaughtered by the People of the Book] by Baha’ al-Din Muhammad ibn Husayn al-‘Amili (1547-1621). In Arabic. 7. Quotations from various sources, mainly Shi’i sources: a. Death of ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab (d. 23 H/644), b. What did Prophet Muhammad do when he had a cold. c. A grammatical explanation of qatt (never). d. A question about the little animal called wazagh (gecko). e. Question regarding why the very cold wind in the winter is called ‘ajuz (old woman). f. A grammatical explanation of halumma (hurry!). 8. Al-Risalah al-I’tiqadiyah [Epistle of Belief] by Muhammad Baqir, who is undoubtedly Muhammad Baqir ibn Muhammad Taqi al-Majlsi (1627 or 8-ca. 1699). 9. Risalah fi al-Taqlid [Epistle on Following (an Imam)] by Husayn ibn ‘Abd as-Samad al-Jubba’i (918-84 H/1512-76). 10. Tuhfat al-Za’ir [Gift to the Visitor] by Muhammad Baqir ibn Muhammad Taqi al-Majlsi (1627 or 8-ca. 1699). In Arabic with Persian translation. The manuscript is dated 17 Jumda al-Awwal 1122 H/15 July 1710. 11. Quotations in Persian and Arabic, all of Shi’i content. 12. Arba’in Surah min al-Tawrah [Forty Chapters from the Torah]. 13. Various quotations, all of Shi’i content. In Arabic and Persian. The Arabic text is written in naskhi script and the Persian text in nasta’liq script throughout


Click to see larger image.

Astronomical Calendar. 1259 H/1843-1844.

 

An elaborate astronomical calendar for the year 1259 H/1843- 1844 in Ottoman Turkish and Arabic, consisting of one long scroll (108 cm. long and 10.8 cm. wide). The text on one side is written in the form of tables in red, black, and gold. On the other side are the names of the days and months, times of prayer, times of fasting and breaking the fast during the month of Ramadan, calculations of the Qiblah (direction towards the Holy city of Mecca), and personal reading of one’s fortune. al-Sayyid al-Hajj ‘Abd Allah at-Tarsusi, whose identity could not be ascertained, wrote the manuscript and may be its author.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Kitab al-‘Uyun al-Sawahir fi Rawdat al-Zawahir [The Book of the Vigilant Eyes in the Flower Garden] by Masud ibn al-Sayyid al- Hijazi Masud. 1 Muharram 1293 H / 28 Jan. 1876.

 

A collection of prose and poetry covering over fifty subjects, collected from different sources and countries and written in clear naskhi/ruq’ah script in brown ink. No reference could be found to the author or his work. In Arabic.

 


Mukhtasar Kitab Ghunyat al-Mutamalli [Abbreviation of the Book on the Requirements of the Discerner], by Burhan al-Din Ibrahim ibn Muhammad al-Halabi (d. 1549 or 50)

 

The book is a major Hanafi jurisprudence work. It is an abbreviation of “Munyat al-Musalli wa-Ghunyat al-Mubtadi” [Desire of the Prayer (worshiper) and Satisfaction of the Beginner] of Sadid al-Din al-Kashghari (13th cent.) (a tract on the law governing ablution and prayer). It was copied by a certain scribe, Mustafa Big ibn al-Hajj Mustafa al-Kanqarawi al-Jalabadi (?) in 1164 H/1751 in the District of Shaykh Uthman in Istanbul. 173 folios, in clear naskhi script in black ink with headings, keywords and markings in red on white glossy paper. Copied 1164 H/1751.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Dala’il al-Khayrat wa-Shawariq al-Anwar fi Dhikr al-Salah ‘ala al- Nabi al-Mukhtar [Guide to Blessings and Shining Lights Regarding Prayers on the Chosen Prophet), by Abu ‘Abd Allah Muhammad ibn Sulayman al-Jazuli (d. 1465). 1208 H / 1793.

 

An illuminated Arabic manuscript of one of the most famous books of prayer in Islamic literature, with two full-page miniatures, one representing the Ka’bah in Mecca, the other the tombs of the Prophet Muhammad and his two companions, Abu Bakr and ‘Umar, in the Medina Mosque. Written in a clear and elegant naskhi script on beige paper, in black ink, with key words and markings in red. The Arabic text is completely vocalized. The pages are ruled in several lines of different colors (gold, black, red, and blue), and the sentences are separated with rosettes in two types of gold and other colors. The opening two pages are highly illuminated in gold, blue, brown, and other colors. Head and tailpieces on several folios are illuminated in gold, blue, red, and other colors. The names of the Prophet Muhammad are written in an intricate design of medallions in two types of gold and other colors. There are a few marginal notes in a tiny but legible script. The text was copied by the calligrapher Mustafa al-Halimi, a student of Mustafa Kutahi. No reference could be found to Mustafa al-Halimi, but Mustafa Kutahi (d. 1202 H/1787 AD) is well known. Bound in contemporary brown morocco, with gilt decoration in central medallions, in two types of gold.

 


Dala’il al-Khayrat wa-Shawariq al-Anwar fi Dhikr al-Salah ‘ala al-Nabi al-Mukhtar [Guide to Blessings and Shining Lights Regarding Prayers on the Chosen Prophet), by Abu ‘Abd Allah Muhammad ibn Sulayman al-Jazuli (d. 1465). Undated, but most likely copied in the 18th century.

 

One of the most famous books of prayer in Islamic literature. This Arabic manuscript illuminated in gold, blue, red, and other colors is written in clear and elegant naskhi script, in black ink, on beige paper, 13 lines to a page. The Arabic text is completely vocalized. All pages are ruled in two blue lines, and the sentences are separated with rosettes in gold, or red, or blue and black. The opening two pages are highly illuminated in gold, blue, brown, and other colors. Head and tail pieces on several folios are illuminated in gold, blue, red, and other colors. There are decorations in similar colors on several other folios. Some of the names of the Prophet Muhammad are written in gold circles and all are separated by small or large rosettes in blue and gold. Pages 16b and 17a contain full page miniatures, one of them representing the Ka’bah in Mecca, the other the tombs of the Prophet Muhammad and his two companions, the Caliphs ‘Umar and Abu Bakr in the Medina Mosque. Bound in contemporary crushed brown morocco, with a flap in the traditional Islamic wallet-style binding, both covers and flap are tooled in gold.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

A Collection of 12 Arabic Manuscripts. Undated, probably copied in the late 19th century.

 

1. A short prayer. 2. An important work on jurisprudence. Mukhtasar wiqayat al-riwayah fi masa’il al hidayah by Sadr al-Shari’ah-Thani, ‘Ubayd Allah ibn Mas’ud ibn Mahmud ibn Ahmad (d. 747 H/1346) (Summary of Protecting the Transmission [of Hadith {sayings and deeds of the Prophet Muhammad}] Regarding the Questions of Guidance). The original work, Wiqayat al-Riwayah (Protection of the Transmission), is by Mahmud ibn Sadr al-Shari’ah al-Awwal, ‘Ubayd Allah al-Mahbubi (d. 673 H/1274), the grandfather of the present author. Copied in 1292 H/1875. 3. Fara’id al-Fawa’id li-Tahqiq Ma’ani al-Isti’arah wa-Aqsamiha by Abu al Qasim ibn Abi Bakr al-Laythi al-Samarqandi (d. ca. 888 H/1563) (The Necklace of Benefits to Ascertain the Meaning of Metaphor and its Categories). 4. Sharh Ma’ani al-Isti’arah (Commentary on Ma’ani al-Isti’arah (The Meanings of Metaphor) by al-Isfara’ini, ‘Isam ad-Din Ibrahim ibn Muhammad ibn ‘Arabshah, known as al-‘Isam (d. ca. 951 H/1544). 5. Tarikat al-Mayyit (The Estate of the Diseased), anonymous. 6.-9. Untitled, anonymous treatises on the division of inheritance; on the burden of proof for a claimant; on the structure of the Arabic language; and on case-endings in the Arabic language. 10. al-Risalah al-Shamsiyah fi al-Qawa’id al-Mantiqiyah (The Shamsi Epistle on the Rules of Logic) / by Najm al-Din ‘Ali ibn ‘Umar ibn ‘Ali al-Qazwini al-Katibi (600-75 H/1204-77). Called The Shamsi Epistle because it was specifically written for Shams al-Din ibn Muhammad. The author, al-Katibi, was a prominent student of the famous Islamic philosopher, Nasir ad-Din al-Tusi (d. 672 AH/1274). 11. Untitled, anonymous commentary on a grammatical treatise. 12. al-Risalah al-Jami’ah li-Khamasat Ashya, anonymous.

 


Kitab al-Ustuwani [The Book of al-Ustuwani], by Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Muhammad al-Shami al-Hanafi al-Ustuwani (d. 1662)

 

Translated from Arabic into Ottoman Turkish. The book is also known under title: “Risalah fi al-Fiqh” (An Epistle on Jurisprudence). No other manuscript is known of this book, neither in Arabic nor in Ottoman Turkish. Probably a unique manuscript. 132 folios, undated but probably from the 18th century. In clear nakhi script, in black ink with headings, keywords and markings in red on white paper. The last leaf is repaired with some loss of text.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Fatawi Shaykh Mashayikh al-Islam Abd al-Rahim Afandi [Fatwas (i.e. Legal Opinions) of the Grand Shaykh of Islam 'Abd al-Rahim Effendi]

 

The Author is most likely the Ottoman Grand Mufti Abdurrahim Efendi, Mentesizade; Seyhulislam; b. in Bursa; d. in Edirne 1716). The manuscript is in Ottoman Turkish. It was copied by Darwish Mustafa ibn Muhammad al-Mawlawi on 27 Rajab 1147 H/23 Dec. 1734. Probably a unique manuscript. 214 folios in clear elegant and handsome ruq’ah script in thick black ink with headings, keywords and markings in red on white glossy paper. Contemporary brown morocco, with both covers embossed with central medallion.

 


al-Qanun fi al-Tibb [Canon of Medicine] by Ibn Sina (Avicenna; 980-1037). Parts IV and V only. 1 Rabi’ al-Awwal 1018 / June 4, 1609.

 

One of the most important works on medicine in the Middle Ages. The text was translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona in the 12th century and into Hebrew in 1279. The Canon medicinae had great influence in the West and was known to Leonardo da Vinci. With its encyclopedic content and systematic arrangement, it soon attained a position of pre-eminence in the medical literature of Europe, displacing the works of Galen as the medical text book in European universities. Arnold C. Klebs described it as “one of the most significant intellectual phenomena of all times.” While the Canadian physician Sir William Osler, called the Qanun “a medical bible for a longer time than any other work.” Part IV deals with the various diseases afflicting the human body. Part V deals with medicinal remedies. The manuscript is written in clear and elegant naskhi script in black ink on white paper, with headings, key words, and markings in red. Bound in recent morocco, with a flap, in the Islamic style of bookbinding. In Arabic.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

A Collection of Ottoman Turkish Manuscripts. Undated, but probably the end of the 18th century.

 

1. Tariqat-i Bektasi [Bektashi Sufi Order]. An anonymous Twelver Shi’i text with Sufi leanings, containing hagiographic and historical materials in clear nasta’liq script, in black ink. 2. Divan-i Safi [Collected Poems of Safi ]. Safi belonged to both the Bektashi Order and the Alawi sect of Islam. He is not mentioned in the usual references sources, but is known to have written poetry. In his The Bektashi Order of Dervishes, J. K. Birge refers to a poem by Safi entitled Sakiname that is recited as part of a Bektashi ritual. Also, in his Tasavvuftan Dilimize Gecen Deyimler ve Atazozleri, Safi Abd¨¹lbaki G?lpinarle refers to three mersiyes (eulogies) set to music, one of them by Safi. Written in clear nasta’liq script, in black ink, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. 3. Poem. With Malamatiyah Sufi Order leanings. The manuscript, which appears to have been written by different hands, is bound in contemporary half morocco.

 


al-Rawdah al-Munawwarah [The Illuminated Garden], by Shihab al-Din Muhammad. Undated, but probably late 18th century.

 

Shihab al-Din Muhammad was one of the employees of Shahjahan (1592-1666), the Mogul Emperor of India (1628-58). The manuscript, in Urdu, provides many details regarding the building of the famous mausoleum of Taj Mahal. It is certainly arguable that the Mogul Empire achieved its greatest prosperity under Shahjahan. The Taj Mahal was built in memory of his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. It took twenty-two laborious years and the combined effort of over twenty thousand workmen and master craftsmen to build the Taj Mahal (completed in 1648) on the banks on the river Yamuna in Agra, the capital of the Mogul monarchs. The manuscript provides information regarding the materials used to build the Taj and their cost, as well as other architectural details. Written in clear nasta’liq script in black ink on white paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red ink. Bound in contemporary morocco, tooled in gilt. There are two stamps of the crest of William H. Morley of Middle Temple, one in the beginning, one at the end. In Urdu.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Khamsah-i Nizami [Nizami's Quintet (Five Stories)], by Nizami Ganjavi, Nizam al-Din Abu Muhammad Ilyas ibn Yusuf (1140 or 41-1202 o4 3). 9 Ramadan 970 H/2 May 1563.

 

The five epic poems in this illuminated Persian manuscript are: 1. Makhzan al-Asrar [Treasure Chamber of Mysteries] 2. Khusru va Shirin [Khusro and Shirin] 3. Layla va Majnun [Layla and Majnun] 4. Haft Paykar [Seven Portraits (Faces, Images, Idols, etc.)] 5. Iskandar Namah [The Story of Alexander] (in two distinct parts: Sharafnamah-i Iskandari “Alexander Book of Honor” and Iqbal Namah “The Book of Happiness”) The manuscript is written in clear and handsome nasta’liq script, on white glazed paper. The text is written in four columns and all the columns of poetry are ruled in gold. There are six illuminated headings in gold and colors and nine competently executed miniatures. There are also hundreds of subheadings illuminated in gold and colors. Eighteenth-century lacquer binding, re-backed in morocco, which is embossed in arabesque design in gilt on both sides of each cover. Nizami (1140-1202) is widely considered one of the greatest poets of Persia and his most important work is the Khamsah (Quintet), a collection of five epic poems, written between 1165 and 1189. Nizami’s importance in Persian literature is due to his supreme skill and influence as well as his role in presenting the archaic style of the epic poem in a lyrical form that emphasized the psychological characterization over the heroic character. The present manuscript dates from the early Safavid period and is a fine example of Safavid calligraphy, handsomely illustrated with nine miniatures. In Persian.

 


Fasl-i Panjam [The Fifth Chapter]. Anonymous

 

A treatise on Arabic morphology (derivation) in Persian. Also titled “al-Juz’ dar Sarf” [A Chapter on Morphology (Derivation)]. 17 folios in nasta’liq script in black ink with headings, keywords and markings in red on white glazed paper. The manuscript is undated but most likely from the 18th century. Recent imitation leather, many wormholes, mainly marginal. The leaves are professionally repaired with no significant loss of text.


Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Two Persian Manuscripts. Undated, but probably 18th century.

 

1. Mizan [Scale]. A grammatical treatise in Persian on Arabic verb formation (folios 1b-14b). There are numerous glosses and commentaries in Persian. 2. Masha’ib [Derived Forms]. An elaborate treatise in Persian on the derivation of various patterns from the same root of Arabic words with numerous commentaries and glosses. The Persian text is written in nasta’liq script in black ink on white, glazed paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red.

 


Three Persian Manuscripts. Ramadan 1016 H/Dec. 1607.

 

1. Ma’rifat-i Taqvim [Knowing the Calendar]. An anonymous text on astrology. 2. Fal Namah [Treatise on Fortune Telling], attributed to ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib with astrological tables. 3. [On the Branches of the Occult], by Nasir ibn Muhammad ibn Haydar Rammal Shirazi. The author’s identity is not known; he could have been a Persian from Shiraz who practiced geomancy [using sand (raml) for divination]. He claims to have summarized his work according to the system developed by Abu ‘Abd Allah Muhammad ibn ‘Uthman al-Zanati who could be al-Shaykh Muhammad al-Falaki al-Zanati author of “al-Fasl fi usul ‘ilm al-Raml” (The Last Word on the Foundations of the Science of Geomancy). All three manuscripts are written in a uniform hand except for two leaves that appear to be replacements of lost leaves. In clear naskhi script, in black ink, with headings, keywords, and markings in red, on white paper. A great deal of care was taken to restore these manuscripts. Each leaf was taken apart and remounted on a new frame. Then the manuscript was rebound.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Iskandar Namah [The Book of Alexander] by Nizami Ganjavi, Nizam al-Din Abu Muhammad Ilyas ibn Yusuf (1140 or 41-1202 o4 3). Dhu al-Hijjah 1249 H/April 1834.

 

The manuscript contains two distinct parts: Sharaf Namah-i Iskandari (The Alexander Book of Honor) and Iqbal Namah (The Book of Happiness). The Book of Alexander belongs to the famous Khamsah-I Nizami (The Five [Stories] of Nizami). It is written in clear and handsome nasta’liq script, on beige glazed paper, in two columns. The columns of poetry are ruled in gold. The text is ruled throughout with several bands of gold, blue, and red lines. On the margin of the manuscript, there is another anonymous poem running the length of the manuscript. The marginal poem is also ruled throughout with several bands of gold, blue, and red lines. There is one illuminated heading and ten competently executed miniatures. Probably from the Kashmiri school of painting. The erotic miniature usually included in the repertoire of this story, and often found damaged, is in perfect condition here. Bound in contemporary morocco, embossed in gilt. The present manuscript dates from the early Safavid period, during the reign of the Savavid ruler of Iran, Shah Tahmasp, the father of Shah ‘Abbas the Great. This is considered the most glorious period of Persian cultural history and the source of the greatest works of painting, calligraphy, and architecture. The manuscript is a fine example of Safavid calligraphy. In Persian.

 


Two Manuscripts, Arabic and Persian. Undated, but probably 18th century.

 

1. al-‘Awamil al-Mi’ah [The One Hundred Regents], by Abd al-Qahir ibn Abd al-Rahman al-Jurjani (d. 1078?), translated into Persian verse. A grammatical work on Arabic syntax. 2. Sharh al-‘Awamil al-Mi’ah [Commentary on the One Hundred Regents], by Abd al-Qahir ibn Abd al-Rahman al-Jurjani (d. 1078?). This commentary on al-Jurjani’s work is in Arabic with numerous interlinear glosses and translations into Persian. The Arabic text is written in naskhi script and the Persian text in nasta’liq script in black ink, with headings, keywords, and markings in red, on white, glazed paper.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Illuminated Talismanic Scroll. Undated, but probably 19th century.

 

This long scroll of thick paper (171 x 7.5 inches) begins with the Basmalah, followed by Surat al-Fatihah (The Opening Chapter [of the Koran]), all written in gold, silver, and other colors, in different styles of writing. This is followed by 29 of “al-Asma’ al-Husna” (The Most Beautiful Names of God), written in horizontal fashion, each name in gold on a circular black background. These circles are surrounded by tiny script, known as ghubari, in the form of a dome. This tiny script begins with Surat al-Fatihah, followed by the Throne Verse (Koran, chapter 2, verse 255), then by various prayers, quotations from the Koran, and other often repeated Islamic phrases. All these verses and invocations are meant to have magical powers to protect the owner of the scroll. In Arabic.

 


Talkhis Miftah al-‘Ulum [Summary of the Key to the Sciences], by Jalal al-Din Muhammad ibn Abd al-Rahman al-Qazwini, Khatib Dimashq (1267 or 8-1338). 1252 H/1836.

 

A summary of part III of Miftah al-‘Ulum [Key to the Sciences] of Abu Ya’qub Yusuf ibn Abi Bakr al-Sakkaki (1160-1229), considered one of the most important works on Arabic rhetoric. It is written in clear and somewhat large nasta’liq script in black ink, on beige paper, with headings, keywords, and markings in red. The opening page contains an illuminated heading in gold and colors. The text is ruled in ocher, black, and red up to folio 32, afterward in red only. It was copied during the year 1252 H (1836). Beautifully bound in half morocco and marbled boards. In Arabic.

 

Click to see larger image.

Click to see larger image.

Ikmal al-Din wa-Itmam al-Ni’mah fi Ithbat al-Ghaybah wa-Kashf al-Hayrah [Completion of Religion and Fulfillment of Favor regarding the Certainty of the Disappearance, hence, Removing the Perplexity], by Ibn Babawayh al-Qummi, Muhammad ibn Ali ibn al-Husayn (918 or 19-991 or 2)

 

The author of this book, sometimes referred to as “Kitab al-Ghaybah” (The Book of Disappearance), was the most learned Shi’i thinker of his day and one of a handful of the most important Shi’i writers in history. The book is an extensive treatise to prove that prophets and imams do disappear and reappear. 271 folios in small naskhi script, in black ink with headings, keywords and markings in red on yellowish, glazed paper. The manuscript was completed on 20 Jumada II 1034 H/28 Feb. 1625.

 


Sharh Nur al-Idah wa-Najat al-Arwah [Commentary on the Light of Elucidation and the Salvation of Souls], by Abu al-Ikhlas Hasan ibn ‘Ammar al-Wafa’i al-Shurunbulali al-Hanafi (1585 or 6-1659)

 

A commentary by the author on his own work “Nur al-Idah wa-Najat al-Arwah” (The Light of Elucidation and the Salvation of Souls) a work on Hanafi jurisprudence. 210 folios in clear naskhi script in black ink, with keywords and markings in red on glossy white paper. The manuscript was completed in the year 1263 H/1846.


 

Click to see larger image.

 
 
 
the end @ copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2011
About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s