The Amizing Ancient Gold Collections Exhibition

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MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE AMIZING ANCIENT GOLD COLLECTIONS EXHIBITION

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Medallion with Bust of Alexander the Great (ca. 218-235 CE) gold. Roman (probably struck in Macedonia), diameter 5.4 cm.

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et les masterpieces de la collection

 

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Mumienmaske eines Mannes, Römisch, 1. Hälfte des 1. Jh. n. Chr, Hawara; Temperamalerei auf Leinwand, Gips,

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Among the works in the new galleries are a pair of Greek serpentine armbands in gold (about 200 B.C.).

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Schildring mit Löwenkopf, Meroitisch, 1. Jhrd. v. Chr., Meroë, Pyramide der Amanishakheto; Gold © SMB,

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Trésor. Argenterie

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Cigale en cristal de roche

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Le collier d’Assiut, 400-600

 

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Gold Turtle Necklace, AD 1400-1521, Mexico. Copyright Dumbarton Oaks, Pre-Columbian Collection, Washington, DC.

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Gold finger ring, 1200 – 1521, gold pendant of human face and warrior-ruler figurine with ritual regalia. Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum.

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Pendant, c. 1200-1521, Mixtec-Zapotec. Gold with silver and copper. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

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Finger ring made of cast gold with a feline head, 1300-1521, Mixtec

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Headdress Ornament with Animals and Birds, Colchian, 350–300 B.C. Gold. Greatest extent: H: 6.6 x W: 6.5 x D: 2.7 cm (2 5/8 x 2 9/16 x 1 1/16 in.) Georgian National Museum, Tbilisi, Georgia, 1-2005/1. Photo: Amiran Kiladze.VEX.2009.4.106

LOS ANGELES, CA.- In a spectacular display of archaeological finds, The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani, on view from July 16–October 5, 2009, at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa, presents more than 140 objects from one of the most celebrated archaeological sites in the Republic of Georgia, including four recently excavated bronze lamps, shown together for the first time.

Vani was an important settlement in the ancient kingdom of Colchis, a region best known as the destination of Jason and the Argonauts in their mythical quest for the Golden Fleece. Even in antiquity, Colchis was renowned as a region rich in gold, and excavations at Vani have confirmed this reputation. Prompted by reports of jewelry that came to the surface following heavy rainfall in the area, archaeologists in the late 1930s began to systematically explore Vani. Their excavations have uncovered a series of burials in which the deceased were laid to rest wearing a sumptuous array of ornaments, and have revealed that Vani was a major political and religious center.

The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani features an extraordinary array of objects, dating from the mid-fifth to mid-first centuries B.C. From an impressive variety of locally-made gold jewelry to imports from the Persian Empire and the Greek world, the ancient treasures in the exhibition reveal both the region’s rich material resources and a complex and fruitful network of interactions with neighboring peoples.

“This exhibition provides a wonderful opportunity to tell the story of this ancient temple city and give visitors a view into the complex interrelations of ancient cultures,” says Michael Brand, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “We are delighted to have these objects together here in Los Angeles for the very first time.”

David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, adds, “We are delighted that these exquisite objects from one of Georgia’s most important archeological sites are serving as the cultural bridge between Georgian museums and American institutions such as the Getty Museum, the Smithsonian, and the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. We are equally pleased to see the Getty Villa bejeweled by the magnificent Georgian treasures of Vani, providing audiences a glimpse into our country, its history, and rich culture. We hope this collaboration with the Getty Museum is only the beginning of a long lasting relationship between our institutions. ”

Although The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani, organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, has toured the United States and Europe, the Getty presentation includes four elaborate bronze lamps that were discovered during excavations at the site in 2007. Part of a hoard of precious bronzes, they may have been deposited during a time of crisis. The discovery of this well-preserved cache of ancient metalwork is significant for the light it sheds on the manufacture and use of bronze in ancient Colchis. Furthermore, the artistry of the lamps is difficult to parallel—for example, the careful rendering of the Indian elephant heads that serve as nozzles for an Incense Burner (250–100 B.C.), or the elaborate composition of the Lamp with Elephant Heads and Human Figures (250–100 B.C.). Two of the lamps—the Lamp with Zeus and Ganymede and Lamp with Erotes (250–100 B.C.)—have never been displayed before, and were brought to the Getty for cleaning and analysis as part of a collaborative project with Georgian archaeologists and conservators.

“This is the first time we’ve brought objects directly from an archaeological site to the Museum for treatment and conservation, which carries with it great responsibility. We have been extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to exchange knowledge and expertise with our Georgian colleagues and were delighted to have Dr. Nino Kalandadze, a visiting conservator morefrom the Georgian National Museum, at the Villa for several weeks working on the lamps with our conservation team,” says Jerry Podany, the Getty Museum’s senior conservator of antiquities.

The exhibition focuses on a treasure trove of objects from five of the 28 graves that have been excavated at the site so far. They date to 450–250 B.C, when Vani was at the height of its prosperity. Among them, Grave 11 is the earliest and perhaps the richest burial. Dating to the mid-fifth century B.C., it contains four bodies laid inside a wooden structure and, outside it, a horse. Although all four bodies wore jewelry, one—a woman—was much more elaborately adorned, indicating her elite status.

The Necklace with Turtle Pendants (about 450 B.C.), a stunning example of Colchian goldwork, is one of the five necklaces discovered in this grave. The shells of the turtles are intricately decorated with granulation—the application of numerous tiny gold spheres—and are indicative of the advanced skill of Colchian goldworkers.

Another burial, Grave 24, excavated in 2004, exemplifies the cultural contacts enjoyed by the local aristocracy, for alongside another assemblage of gold jewelry and adornments are vessels imported from—or inspired by—both the Greek world and the Persian Empire. Of particular interest is the Silver Belt (350–300 B.C.) that depicts a banqueter attended by servants, testifying to the cultural importance of feasting.

The other three burials featured in the exhibition include a grave of a woman (Grave 6), which contained a striking polychrome pendant, manufactured in the Persian Empire but imported and adapted for local use at Vani; the grave of a warrior (Grave 9), whose gold ring bears an inscription in Greek, Dedatos, which may be his name; and the grave of an infant girl (Grave 4), who was adorned with gold jewelry just like her elders.

“The archaeological finds not only demonstrate the highly refined craftsmanship of local goldworkers, but also testify to contacts with both the Greek world and the Persian Empire,” says Karol Wight, the Getty Museum’s senior curator of antiquities. “Through our presentation, we hope to introduce visitors to an ancient heritage that expands our knowledge of an important civilization in this region. Many of the objects unearthed at Vani are without parallel in the ancient Mediterranean world.”

After the mid-third century B.C., evidence of rich burials ceases at the site. Most of the structures—such as altars and cult buildings—seem to have a religious or ritual function and, according to some scholars, Vani served thereafter as a sanctuary-city. Among the treasures from this period is the Torso of a Youth (200–100 B.C.), a well-proportioned bronze in a style that recalls Greek sculptures dating to 490–460 B.C., but that seems to have been made locally. It was discovered in an archaeological context that indicates it was a victim of the military destruction sustained at Vani around 50 B.C., which brought activity at the site to an abrupt end.

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Gold Phiale Mesomphalos, Vani, Achaemenid influence, 400-350 B.C

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Pendentif à deux passants en forme de grenouille chamanique. Diquis-Veraguas, Costa Rica ou Panama (700-1.500 ap. J.-C.) 

décoré d’un serpent s’échappant de la gueule de l’animal. Ses quatre pieds sont terminés par des têtes d’alligators. Or jaune, fonte à la cire perdue. Hauteur : 8 cm / longueur : 6 cm / Poids : 62,9g . Estimation : 10 000/12 000 €

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Pendentif à un passant arrière en forme de faon ou de cerf. Costa Rica ou Panama (700-1.500 ap. J.-C.)

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Diadem, Late 4th c. B.C., Gold. From Populonia. Florence, National Archaeological Museum

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Pair of “bauletto” Earrings, Middle of 6th c. B.C., Gold.

 

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Gold necklace elements, with turquoise, gray chalcedony, glass. Iran, late 14th to early 15th century C.E. Photograph © 1989 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

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Gold pendant with pair of birds, Greater Iran, 11th to 12th century C.E.

 

The Garden of Eden plays an important part in Islamic jewelry, with birds being the central theme. Here we see a pair of birds touching at their beaks and chests as they stand on their tiny feet in the middle of this pendant.

 

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Carnelian and gold necklace, Deir el-Balah, 13th century B.C.E.

 

This necklace consists of 244 carnelian and gold beads and wedjat eye amulets. The center gold spacer is decorated in the repoussé technique; it depicts an image of the goddess Hathor, the goddess of love and joy

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Pair of Earrings with Dangling Bells, Parthian, 3rd to 2nd century B.C.E. Gold, H: 6.5 cm. Private Collection

NEW YORK, NY.- The National Jewelry Institute (NJI), the world’s first institute devoted to jewelry and precious objects, announced that Masterpieces of Ancient Jewelry: Exquisite Objects from the Cradle of Civilization is on view at The Forbes Galleries, located at 62 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY through December 31, 2008.

Cited by experts as the most unique and profound show of its kind, the exhibition brings together 135 jewelry objects and accessories from the far reaches of history and the birthplace of civilization. Culled from the world’s greatest museums, the collection includes breathtaking pieces from the Louvre in Paris, Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin, Israel Museum in Jerusalem, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Princeton University Art Museum.

As Christopher Forbes, Vice Chairman, Forbes, Inc. stated, “Masterpieces of Ancient Jewelry offers a window into ancient life and society. This is the sixth in a series of exhibitions organized by the National Jewelry Institute for which The FORBES Galleries have been privileged to provide a setting. It is also the most ambitious exhibition undertaken to date. Bringing almost 150 pieces for a show is a daunting task under any circumstances, but when the works in question include priceless treasures thousands of years old coming from museums and private collections around the world, the effort involved is Herculean.”

Some of the gems and jewels showcased are more than 7,000 years old and derive from the Ancient Near East, including Mesopotamia, the region that is believed by many historians to be the location of the Garden of Eden, revered by the world’s major religions.

“Jewelry is much more than simply personal adornment,” said Price. “Like all true art, it can be a remarkable expression of a culture and way of life. This collection offers a glimpse of an ancient civilization—one that lies at the very foundation of the modern Western world.”

Following its run at The Forbes Galleries, the exhibition will travel to the Field Museum in Chicago where it will be on display from February 13, 2009 through July 5, 2009.

The corporate partners for Masterpieces of Ancient Jewelry are: Christian Dior Couture and AXA Art Insurance Corporation. NJI has also produced a book titled Masterpieces of Ancient Jewelry: Exquisite Objects from the Cradle of Civilization, published by Running Press (ISBN 978-0-7624-3386-5).

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Deux magnifiques exemples de la joaillerie égyptienne

 

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Trésor

 

 

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Collier. Art hellénistique. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Bandeau tressé composé de six rangs de fins maillons, dont les extrémités forment un cœur serti d’un grenat. 47,5 cm. Estimation : 10 000 / 12 000 €

Paire de bracelets en or. Iran, 17e siècle. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Anneaux articulés creux, dont les extrémités jointes sont en forme de polyèdres bulbeux. Le décor, repoussé et ciselé, se compose de bandes obliques, de motifs floraux et végétaux en frises et de listels ponctués. Diam. 9,5 cm. Estimation : 7 000 / 8 000 €

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Cast-Gold Composite Animal Effigy Pendant (detail)

Emerging from the soaring cloud forests, rushing rivers, and dancing waterfalls of Central Panama, a celestial hero of ancient myth, arrayed in supernatural golden clothing, revealed himself to the modern world when, in the early 1900s, stories began to circulate of children playing marbles with gold beads found in the great Coclé River.

The first Cuna San Blas Indians believed their gods, heroes, and other mythic men and women could turn into animals at will to accomplish special purposes. At the time of a great flood or other cosmic disaster, gods transformed people into animals to allow them to survive or to punish them. It was in the late 1920s that news of a veritable “river of gold” began to spread as large quantities of fabled golden animals and sacred ornaments were discovered, attracting the attention of archaeologists.

River of Gold: Precolumbian Treasures from Sitio Conte tells the story of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s (whose collection was the source of the incredible exhibition Searching for Ancient Egypt, which drew 134,578 visitors to Joslyn in 1999) excavations at the Precolumbian cemetery of Sitio Conte, Panama, and, for the first time, presents these archaeological treasures within their cultural context.

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Cast-Gold Bat Effigy Pendant (detail)

The cemeteries of Sitio Conte — about 100 miles west of Panama City — were overlooked by gold-seeking Spaniards in the 16th century, a fortunate circumstance when, at the turn of the 19th century, the Rio Grande de Coclé shifted its bed yet again and partially exposed the burials and their contents. In the 1940s a Penn Museum expedition undertook an excavation that uncovered rich and remarkable evidence that a thriving Precolumbian civilization had inhabited the region more than a thousand years previously. Great quantities of gold artifacts and jewelry were found especially in the grave of one high-status individual. Like the sun emerging from the underworld, gold objects removed from the burial mounds conveyed highly symbolic images of the creation myth and personifications of nature’s animal and human forces. The gold work from the site, which is almost entirely body ornamentation, is famous for its extraordinary beauty and sophisticated technology. Goldsmiths of the New World were consummate artisans, and those who created the objects found in the Sitio Conte cemetery were no exception. Working with the simplest of tools, they utilized technologies such as embossing, lost-wax casting, and depletion gilding to achieve extraordinary aesthetic effects. Plaques and cuffs were crafted from hammered gold sheet; cast pendants were exquisitely detailed, one-of-a-kind items.

The exhibition presents the gold from Sitio Conte in its unique archaeological and cultural context. Included are more than 150 gold objects dating from 700 to 1100 AD — hammered repoussé plaques, nose ornaments, gold-sheathed ear rods, pendants, bells, bangles, and beads — as well as richly detailed, painted ceramics and objects of precious and semi-precious stone, ivory, and bone.

Very little is known about the ancient societies of Central America, which have long been overshadowed by the more famous Precolumbian civilizations of Mesoamerica and the Andes. River of Gold is not only a visually stunning exhibition, it also gives viewers an invaluable glimpse into a Panamanian society as it was a thousand years ago and promotes an understanding of the culture of these enigmatic people who left such sophisticated art in their elite burials.

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Gold Nose Clip (detail)

Parements cloisonnés. 5e-6e siècle

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Parements cloisonnés. 5e-6e siècle. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Six boucles et boutons, dont trois en forme de fleurs écloses, sertis de grenats ou de turquoises. Quelques lacunes. Estimation : 50 000 / 60 000 €

Provenance : Collection L. Grenacs, Belgique. (1975).

 à l’antilope. Art sino-sibérien des Steppes, 1er millénaire av. J.C.

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Plaque à l’antilope. Art sino-sibérien des Steppes, 1er millénaire av. J.C. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Plaque discoïde en fer recouverte d’une feuille d’or repoussée, décorée d’une antilope couchée, tête de trois-quarts tournée en arrière. 4,8 cm – Estimation : 12 000 / 14 000 €

Provenance : Hôtel Drouot (Me Boisgirard – A. Kevorkian), 15 Décembre 1995 : n° 9B.

Vase libatoire.Bactriane, 3e-2e millénaire av. J.C.

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Vase libatoire.Bactriane, 3e-2e millénaire av. J.C. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Vase à panse arrondie et bec en gouttière horizontale, fendu au sommet. A l’opposé, une anse coudée tubulaire, appliquée au récipient, comme le bec, par une plaque discoïde percée de trous formant passoire, se prolonge par une tête de chameau à robe ponctuée et crinière en mèches. Haut. 10 ; Long. 33 ; Diam. 14 cm – Estimation sur demande

Un rapport d’analyse effectué à Los Angeles par Pieter Meyers confirmant l’ancienneté de l’objet sera remis à l’acquéreur.

 

Broche aux animaux. Art grec, vers le 5e siècle av. J.C.

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Broche aux animaux. Art grec, vers le 5e siècle av. J.C. photo Boisgirard et Associés

Plaque rectangulaire, décorée de rosettes et fleurs écloses et garnie dans les angles de quatre figurines de taureaux couchés, tête tournée en direction d’un lion accroupi. Plaque : 7 x 4,5 cm – Estimation : 28 000 / 32 000 €

 

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Bague romaine en or et intaille du 3e siècle.

Lourde bague romaine en or fin. L’anneau est formé d’une large bande plate qui va en s’élargissant du pied aux épaules. Les épaules sont incisées de deux nervures profondes et une plus fine au centre. Les bords du chaton sont découpés de volutes. L’intaille est en agate onyx à trois bandes, en forme de cône tronqué, ce qui, vue de dessus, lui donne l’apparence d’un œil. Ce type d’agate était très recherché pour ses vertus prophylactiques. Une inscription de trois caractères romains est gravée sur le sommet de l’intaille : M A P, sans doute pour représenter les initiales du nom du propriétaire (Marcus Antonius Publius, par exemple). Le serti de l’intaille est « en cuvette ».

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A Hellenistic gold oak wreath, Circa 4th-3rd Century B.C. Estimate: £100,000 – 120,000. photo Bonhams

A delicate wreath made of fine gold oak leaves with acorns, of the type worn by Alexander the Great’s father, Philip II of Macedon, is one of the highlights of Bonhams sale of Antiquities on April 28 in New Bond Street.

This stunning artefact, estimate £100,000-120,000, may once have graced the head of a ruler or dignitary over 2,000 years ago. “The fact that this delicate collection of fine gold leaves and acorns formed into a wreath has survived the centuries is almost miraculous,” says Madeleine Perridge, Antiquities Specialist at Bonhams. Previously in a private collection since the 1930s, “it is a beautiful example of a type that is rare to the market.”

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A Hellenistic gold oak wreath (details), Circa 4th-3rd Century B.C. Estimate: £100,000 – 120,000. photo Bonhams

Composed of numerous projecting sprays of sheet gold oak leaves with serrated edges and veins, miniature acorns nestling amongst them, each spray attached by twisted gold wire to a circular gold tube, the overlapping ends bound together to form a crown, 17in (43cm) diam, 5½in (14cm) deep, mounted on a perspex stand. 

Provenance: Private Swiss collection acquired between the 1930s-60s.
Acquired by the present owner at Sotheby’s London, July 11th, 1988, lot 83. Accompanied by a metallurgical/condition report.

Literature: The most famous of these types of wreaths is that found at Vergina in the tomb of Alexander the Great’s father Philip II of Macedon: M. Andronicos, Vergina: The Royal Tombs and the Ancient City, (Athens 1984), figs.137 & 184. However, such gold wreaths have been found in burials all over the Hellenistic world including Asia Minor, the North Pontic, and Magna Graecia. This is a very ornate and detailed example; for a similar oak leaf wreath with acorns, cf. D. Williams & J. Ogden, Greek Gold: Jewellery of the Classical World, (London 1994), pp.106-7, no.60; Also cf. Exhibition Catalogue, The Search for Alexander, (New York 1980), pl.36, p.187, no.173.

The sale also boasts a private English Collection of finely-painted Greek vases of exceptional condition. Previously exhibited at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, they are painted by leading artists from Classical Athens. They include:

An Attic red-figure stemless kylix by Douris, circa 480 B.C. showing a draped youth with defined musculature, standing in an Athenian wine-shop amongst large amphorae, (estimate £30,000-40,000). Exhibited in the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard from 1937, this drinking cup is a fascinating image of Athenian life in the Classical period.

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Pyramid mounts and an inscribed strip from the Anglo-Saxon gold Staffordshire hoard which has now received a £1.3m Heritage grant to meet the £3.3m total required for it to remain in Midlands museums. Photograph: Staffordshire hoard website/PA

LONDRES (ROYAUME-UNI) [25.03.10] – Le Trésor de Staffordshire, un des plus importants trésors anglo-saxons, a été sauvé de la dispersion grâce à une subvention d’environ 1,3 millions de livres du National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF).

La NHMF qui fait pourtant face à d’importants problèmes financiers – son budget ayant été réduit de moitié – a contribué à hauteur d’environ 1,3 millions de livres à la sauvegarde du trésor de Staffordshire. Cette contribution met fin à neuf mois de campagne pour conserver le Trésor sur le territoire britannique, plus précisément dans deux musées du West Midlands, région de sa découverte.

Trouvé en juin 2009 par un amateur dans la région du Staffordshire, le dépôt daté des VIIe VIIIe siècles qui se compose de 1500 objets à caractère guerrier en or (5 kg) et en argent (1,3 kg) est le plus important trésor anglo-saxon découvert à ce jour.

Déclaré trésor en septembre 2009 par le coroner – fonctionnaire chargé entre autres, de mettre en application le Treasure Act, c’est-à-dire l’ensemble de lois relatives à la découverte d’un trésor –, il devient un bien de la couronne britannique. Récupéré pour des études par le Burningham Archeology, il fait depuis, l’objet d’expositions, d’abord au Burningham Museum & Art Gallery puis au British Museum –jusqu’au 17 avril 2010.

En novembre 2009, le comité chargé d’évaluer le prix du Trésor a estimé celui-ci à plus de 3 millions de livres, somme qui devait être réunie par les musées locaux avant le 17 avril sans quoi le trésor serait alors vendu à des acheteurs privés.

Dame Jenny Abramsky s’est félicité de cette initiative en précisant au Guardian que « c’est exactement pour ce genre de chose que NHMF a été créé » et qu’il répondait ainsi à sa mission première de préservation du patrimoine national d’importance exceptionnelle en danger. La ministre de la Culture britannique, Margaret Hodge, a également salué ce geste.

Néanmoins, une somme supplémentaire d’environ 1,7 millions de livres est nécessaire pour pouvoir étudier et conserver correctement le trésor qui est loin d’avoir livré tous ses secrets.

Les 3,3 millions de livres seront partagées entre le découvreur et le propriétaire du terrain sur lequel le trésor a été découvert. www.artclair.com 

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Amateur metal detector unearths largest haul of gold from the period ever found – 1,500 pieces including weapons, helmet decorations, coins and Christian crosses. Photograph: PR

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A dagger hilt found in the Staffordshire hoard. Photograph: PR

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A detail of a fish and eagles. The first scraps of gold were found in a field by Terry Herbert, an amateur metal detector, in July. He could now be in line to share £1m with the landowner. Photograph: PR

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A folded cross. Photograph: PR

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A gold helmet cheekpiece. Photograph: PR

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A gold hilt fitting with inlaid garnets. One expert has described the hoard as being as significant as the Book of Kells. Photograph: PR

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A gold plaque with entwined and stylised arms. Photograph: PR

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A gold scabbard boss with inlaid garnets. Photograph: PR

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A gold strip with a biblical inscription. Photograph: PR

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A pair of pyramid sword fittings. Photograph: PR

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A figure of an animal, possibly from the crest of a helmet. Photograph: PR

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A gold sword fitting with an inlaid garnet. Photograph: PR

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A cheekpiece, fittings and zoomorphic mount. Photograph: PR

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Fish and eagles. Photograph: PR

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A glass chequerboard stud with a gold and garnet surround

 

“Byzanz: Splendour and Everyday Life” @ the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn

 

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Perfume brazier, 12th century, San Marco, Venice; © Procuratoria della Basilica di San Marco, Venezia

 

BONN.- Presenting more than 600 magnificent and historically meaningful exhibits and important artefacts from collections and archaeological excavations the exhibition shed light on many aspects of the history, archaeology and art of the Byzantine Empire.

It will offer an overview of the “Byzantine Millenium” (from the foundation of Constantinople by Constantine the Great in 324 A.D. to the conquest by the Ottomans in 1453), but will concentrate above all on the prospering of the Empire from the time of Justinian I (527–565 A.D.) until the plundering of Constantinople by western crusaders in 1204. Preciosous ivories, spectacular icons and manuscripts, architectural fragments, sculptures and everyday objects are presented in their original contexts. The main questions of the Byzantine state, Byzantine art and culture, society, economy, the Byzantine military, as well as daily life, etc., are to be discussed on the basis of “scenes”, by means of which these themes can be made highly accessible. The “scenes” will be reconstructed and animated with the help of computer graphics; archaeological finds will thus “speak”. Animated films will introduce the respective sections of the exhibition.

 

The exhibition will also illustrate the achievements of the various disciplines that have contributed to our understanding of Byzantine culture, and thus have enabled an understanding of the present: above all Byzantine studies, art history and archaeology, along with few other related fields.

 

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Medaillon with St. Theodore, 12th century, Museum of Historical Treasures of Ukraine, Kiev; © Museum of Historical Treasures of Ukraine, Kiev

 

Antiquity has left its mark on Europe. In which way this happened clearly distinguishes Western from Eastern Europe. The upheavals of the Migration Period with the subsequent foundation of the barbarian kingdoms largely brought the development of the Mediterranean civilisation to a standstill in the Roman West. It was the church that managed the inheritance of the Greeks and Romans. Both the Carolingeans and agents of the powerful 14th century Renaissance consciously reached back to the time of Constantine the Great and carried the achievements of Antiquity forward.

The situation in the East was different: In Constantinople, the Greco-Roman world in its Christian version remained vibrant for centuries. The members of ruling circles regarded themselves as the heirs of Greece and Rome; they were conscious of the ancient past and could draw from it. Naturally, over the course of centuries adaptations were made to meet new conditions as they arose. Almost parallel to the rise of the Ottonian kings, Byzantium became a medieval state. Yet, substantial elements of Roman civilisation endured: The literary and scientific inheritance of Rome was preserved in scholarly circles and monastic scriptoria; the Empire likewise remained urban and centralised in its structure. Even in difficult periods of Byzantine history, the uniform system of taxation and finance continued to function and interregional trade ensured the supply for the cities. High-quality goods like silk textiles and masterful enamelled works were appreciated internationally.

The contribution of the Byzantine Empire to modern Europe is far more important than we are aware of. Because Constantinople resisted Arab expansion, the medieval West could continue developing. The christianisation of all of Southeastern and Eastern Europe, the Balkan countries, Ukraine and Russia was conducted by Byzantium; Cyrillic script was developed by Byzantine missionaries. The European legal system is based on the Corpus iuris civilis promulgated in Byzantium under the emperor Justinian I. The Italian Renaissance received substantial impulses from Byzantine erudition, not least from the classical Byzantine painting. Even Turkish culture is likewise partly based on Byzantine antecedents: for example, the typical architecture of the mosques developed from the Byzantine domed churches.

 

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Necklace, Constantinople (?), around 600, RGZM, Mainz, © RGZM, Mainz

 

I. The problem of the sources
The extant sources from the Byzantine Empire are modest in comparison with their significance for European history. Historians must do with relatively few written sources since only fragments of the once rich archives survived today. Of the magnificent palaces and public buildings almost nothing remains. In essence, a few churches and their furnishings inform us about the size of the last ancient state in the Middle Ages. For this reason archaeological research is even more important, since its potential is nearly unlimited and its methods, in part due to the contributions of natural sciences, continue to develop. Only in the last decades special attention has been given to daily life of the general population of Byzantium, and there are new results from all regions of the Byzantine Empire that can be placed in a larger context. German and Austrian institutions are leading or involved in many of these undertakings.

II. The planned exhibition
The exhibition will make use of magnificent and historically meaningful exhibits and important artefacts from collections and archaeological excavations to shed light on many aspects of the history, archaeology and art of the Byzantine Empire. It will offer an overview of the “Byzantine Millenium” (from the foundation of Constantinople by Constantine the Great in 324 A.D. to the conquest by the Ottomans in 1453), but will concentrate above all on the prospering of the Empire from the time of Justinian I (527–565 A.D.) until the plundering of Constantinople by western crusaders in 1204. The main questions of the Byzantine state, Byzantine art and culture, society, economy, the Byzantine military, as well as daily life, etc., are to be discussed on the basis of “scenes”, by means of which these themes can be made highly accessible. The “scenes” will be reconstructed and animated with the help of computer graphics; archaeological finds will thus “speak”. Animated films will introduce the respective sections of the exhibition. The planned exhibition will also illustrate the achievements of the various disciplines that have contributed to our understanding of Byzantine culture, and thus have enabled an understanding of the present: above all Byzantine studies, art history and archaeology, along with few other related issues.

 

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Portrait of Constantine I, 325–330,

 

The Ancient Afghanistan Collections Exhibition

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MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE ANCIENT AFGHANISTAN COLLECTIONS EXHIBITION

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A 1st century AD Roman Egyptian enameled glass goblet discovered in Begram, Afghanistan, is seen on display in an exhibition entitled ‘Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World’, . The exhibition is showcasing over 200 objects belonging to the National Museum of Afghanistan which is currently undergoing reconstruction and accompanied by selected items  

The  latest exhibition displays ancient artifacts in gold, glass, stone and ivory from Afghanistan, a country whose fortune, and curse, has long been to lie at a crossroads of cultures, traders, artists and armies.

That these objects have survived for thousands of years is remarkable. That they have survived the last three decades of Soviet invasion, civil war, Taliban vandalism and continuing conflict seems little short of a miracle.

The items in this touring show, whose London leg was being opened Tuesday by Afghan President Hamid Karzai, were thought lost in the destruction of the National Museum of Afghanistan in the 1990s. In fact, they had gone underground, hidden away just before the Soviet withdrawal in 1989 by museum staff, who kept the secret, despite personal risk, during the years of Taliban rule.

“Many times they brought forces to the National Museum (to ask) ‘Where are these artifacts?’” said Abdul Wasey Feroozi of Afghanistan’s institute of archaeology.“We said, ‘We don’t know.’ Nobody gave answers to anybody about where these objects were.”

Seventy percent of the museum’s artifacts were wrecked or looted during the post-Soviet chaos or destroyed by the fundamentalist Taliban, who demolished much of the country’s pre-Islamic art in the belief that it was idolatrous.

But two years after the Taliban regime was toppled by a U.S.-led 2001 invasion, Karzai announced that six safes full of objects had been found in an underground vault in the grounds of the presidential palace. When archeologists and museum curators cut into the cases with circular saws, they found a treasure trove — 22,000 gold items from a 2,000-year-old nomadic burial ground, some of which form the climax of the current exhibition.

“Being in that bank vault was like being in Tut’s tomb,”said National Geographic Society archaeologist Fredrik Hiebert, who spent two years cataloguing the treasures and still bubbles with enthusiasm for the find. “It was all unexpected. I had been among the ranks of scholars to say, ‘These things are lost.’” 

This collections  hadn’t seen  in years and were uncertain of their fate, were ecstatic to find they had survived.

“All of a sudden,”Hiebert said, “the Afghans realized that they themselves had saved their cultural heritage.”

The exhibition of that heritage features artifacts from four remarkably different ancient societies, all found within the borders of modern-day Afghanistan — a Bronze Age farming civilization, a classical Greek city, a Silk Road palace and a nomads’ cemetery.

They attest to the vast range of influences on the strategically located Central Asian land.

One room features artifacts from Ai Khanum, a Greek city in what is now northern Afghanistan, complete with houses, temples, a gymnasium and an amphitheater. Founded by a general of the Macedonian conqueror Alexander the Great in 300 B.C., it was a piece of Greece on the steppe, whose relics include sundials, the heavy tops of Corinthian columns and a statuette of the hero Heracles.

Also on display are treasures from China, India and the Roman Empire, hidden 2,000 years ago at Begram — present-day Bagram, site of a major U.S. air base north of Kabul. Archeologists are still debating whether it was the warehouse of a merchant moving goods along the Silk Road or the treasures of a palace, hidden for safekeeping during an invasion.

The most dazzling artifacts are also the most surprising, because they belonged to nomadic steppe dwellers who otherwise left few traces of their civilization.

Uncovered in 1978 at a site aptly known to locals as Tillya Tepe, the Hill of Gold, were 22,000 golden objects — crowns, daggers, bracelets, amulets, earrings and bowls — inside the graves of five women and a man from the 1st century A.D.

Adorned with a cross-cultural mix of symbols — Persian lions, Greek heroes, Indian swastikas — they are, Hiebert said, “an art we had never seen before in Afghanistan, a true Silk Road art.”

“It was the first window on a whole new culture,”he said. “Unfortunately, that window closed suddenly in 1979.”

The motto of the Afghan National Museum is “A Nation Stays Alive When Its Culture Stays Alive,” and the exhibition reveals what a difficult process that can be.

The show opens with a small stone statue from the Greek period of a naked boy. Already damaged when it was dug up in 1971, it was restored and put on display in the museum. It was decapitated by the Taliban before being restored and put on display again — headless but proud.

New excavations in Afghanistan remain hampered by war and the huge challenge to national reconstruction.

“Archaeology,” Hiebert noted, “is not the highest priority.”

The Kabul museum has been restored with the help of international donations. It also receives a share of income from the exhibition, which has already toured Europe and North America — but has gained a new postscript in London.

The final room of the exhibition displays delicately carved ivory inlays, showing scenes of bare-breasted women, exotic animals and mythical beasts that adorned Indian-made furniture built 2,000 years ago.

Like so much else, the ivories were missing and presumed lost, but were recently purchased by a London dealer who handed them back to Afghanistan. They have been restored by British Museum experts and after the exhibition closes will be returned to the Kabul museum.

British Museum director Neil MacGregor said they were a fitting close to the exhibition’s story of “creation, of exchange, of destruction and recovery.”

“We wanted,” he said, “to end on a note of hope.”

“Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World”

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Gold crown from Tillya Tepe, 1st century AD. Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

This astonishing object was found in the tomb of a nomadic woman. It was designed and assembled from different pieces which allowed it to be folded when not in use. It is the ultimate example of portable nomadic wealth.

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Gold bowl from Tepe Fullol, 2200–1900 BC. Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

This fragment was part of a large group of gold and silver vessels found at Tepe Fullol in northern Afghanistan. Its discovery in 1965 suddenly revealed new evidence for the early antiquity of the region. The design on it resembles that of bulls shown in ancient Mesopotamian art – the two regions were connected by trade.

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Corinthian capital found at Ai Khanum, before 145 BC.  Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

Ai Khanum is the modern name of a Hellenistic Greek city built on the banks of the river Oxus (Amu darya) in the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC. Extensively excavated by French archaeologists in the 1960s and 1970s, it gives an almost complete city plan. The architecture is a combination of local tradition and imported Classical styles.

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Enamelled glass goblet from Begram, 1st century AD. Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

This was made in Roman Egypt and exported by sea via the Red Sea and Indian Ocean to India. It was then brought overland to Begram which was the summer capital of the Kushan Kingdom. It was found in a storeroom at the heart of a palace. The decoration shows a scene of people harvesting dates.

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Indian ivory furniture support from Begram, 1st century AD. Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

A large number of heavily decorated pieces of furniture were found in the palace storerooms at Begram. The wood had disintegrated but the ivory and bone inlays survived. These were originally heavily painted. The style of carving suggests they were imported from India.

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Inlaid gold pendant from Tillya Tepe, 1st century AD. Image: National Museum of Afghanistan © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet

This is one of a pair of identical pendants found in a tomb. It shows a figure subduing a pair of mythical beasts. It is heavily inlaid with different coloured materials, including turquoise, garnet, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and pearl, some of which are long-distance imports. This underlines the position of Afghanistan on the crossroads of the world

The Vintage Annam Vietnam Imperial Collections Exhibition

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

The Vintage AnnamVietnam Imperial Collections Exhibition

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“Bảo Vật Hoàng cung”, “Trésors impériaux” “Imperial Treasures” @ Bảo tàng Lịch sử Việt Nam

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Hoàng cung vốn bí ẩn với với người đời, bảo vật trong hoàng cung lại càng bí ẩn, đến nỗi những người biết đến và được chiêm ngưỡng những bảo vật này hàng trăm năm qua cơ hồ chỉ có mấy người. Chính vì vậy những bảo vật từ hoàng cung các triều đại phong kiến Việt Nam luôn phủ một bức màn bí ẩn, thậm chí nhiều người cho rằng chúng đã sớm không còn tồn tại hoặc đang nằm ở các bảo tàng, bộ sưu tập trên thế giới, hoặc ngộ nhận một số đồ dùng thông thường trong cung đình là bảo vật hoàng cung. Bảo vật hoàng cung ngay từ khi được chế tác hay lưu truyền qua các triều đại đều là những vật tượng trưng cho quyền lực tối thượng của nhà vua, những đồ ngự dụng.

Thật may mắn, qua nhiều thăng trầm của lịch sử, những bảo vật của các triều đại Lê, Nguyễn: Ấn vàng, kiếm vàng, sách vàng, đồ ngự dụng bằng vàng, ngọc… có số lượng tới hàng trăm chiếc, vẫn còn được bảo quản, gìn giữ nguyên vẹn tại Bảo tàng Lịch sử Việt Nam; Đây là những bảo vật vô giá của nhân dân Việt Nam, không những chứa đựng những giá trị lịch sử phong phú mà còn phản ánh tài nghệ khéo léo của các nghệ nhân cung đình qua từng thời đại.

Sưu tập bảo vật này nhiều năm qua được lưu giữ cẩn mật tại kho của bảo tàng phục vụ công tác nghiên cứu mà chưa có dịp giới thiệu, trưng bày vì nhiều lý do. Nhân sự kiện lịch sử trọng đại – Đại lễ 1000 năm Thăng Long – Hà Nội, Bảo tàng Lịch sử Việt Nam lần đầu tiên tổ chức một trưng bày chuyên đề đặc biệt: “Bảo vật Hoàng cung” giới thiệu một phần nhỏ trong kho tàng bảo vật vô giá nói trên với nhân dân cả nước, bạn bè quốc tế. Mong rằng, trong một tương lai không xa, khi Bảo tàng Lịch sử Quốc gia hoàn thành, những bảo vật trân quý này sẽ có được một không gian xứng đáng để trưng bày phục vụ công chúng.

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Mũ vàng triều Nguyễn. Coiffes en or de la dynastie des Nguyễn

Vàng. Triều Nguyên, TK 19. 26,7x17cm. C:17,8cm. Trong luong: 720g. Coiffe en or (720 grammes), dynastie des Nguyễn, 19ème siècle.

 

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

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Vua Khải Định. L’empereur Khải Định.

Vàng. Triều Nguyên, TK 19. Trong luong: 660g. Coiffe en or (660 grammes) et diamants, dynastie des Nguyễn, 19ème siècle

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Mũ vàng triều Nguyễn. Coiffes en or de la dynastie des Nguyễn

 

Vàng. Triều Nguyên, TK 19. 26,7x17cm. C:17,8cm. Trong luong: 720g. Coiffe en or (720 grammes), dynastie des Nguyễn, 19ème siècle.

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Vua Khải Định. L’empereur Khải Định.

 

Vàng. Triều Nguyên, TK 19. Trong luong: 660g. Coiffe en or (660 grammes) et diamants, dynastie des Nguyễn, 19ème siècle

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Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Vua Duy Tân. L’empereur Duy Tân

Vua Duy Tân. L’empe

reur Duy Tân

Ấn, kiếm vàng triều Nguyễn – Sceaux et épées de la dynastie des Nguyễn

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Từ trái qua phải: Ấn vàng “Sắc mệnh chi bảo” bằng vàng ròng nặng 8,5 kg, đúc năm Minh Mạng 8 (1827);

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 ấn ngọc “Đai Nam Thu thiên vĩnh mệnh truyền quốc tỷ” của triều Nguyễn; ấn “Quốc gia tín bảo” đúc bằng vàng, nặng gần 5 kg vào niên hiệu Gia Long.

Ấn vàng “Sắc mệnh chi bảo”. Đúc tháng 10 năm Minh Mệnh 8 (1827). Trọng lượng: 8500 Gr. Sceau en or de l’empereur Minh Minh Mạng, 1827, poids: 8500 grammes.

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Ảnh: BTLS

Ấn “Sắc mệnh chi bảo” gồm 2 cấp, có hình vuông, trên có hình rồng đầu ngẩng, 2 sừng dài, đuôi xòe 9 dải hình ngọn lửa, lưng ấn khắc hai dòng chữ Hán: “Thập tuế hoàng kim nhị bách nhị thập tam lạng lục tiền – Minh Mạng bát niên thập nguyệt cát nhật tạo”. (Vàng 10 tuổi nặng 223 lạng 6 tiền – đúc vào ngày lành tháng 10 năm thứ 8 Minh Mạng, 1827).

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Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Photo d’époque du sceau en or de l’empereur Minh Mạng.

Ấn “Quốc gia tín bảo” đúc bằng vàng, nặng gần 5 kg vào niên hiệu Gia Long. - Ảnh: Tiến Thành. Sceau en or (environ 5kg) de l’empereur Gia Long.

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Ấn ngọc “Đai Nam Thu thiên vĩnh mệnh truyền quốc tỷ”. Triều Nguyễn. Sceau en jade. Dynastie desNguyễn, 19ème siècle.

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Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Kiếm vàng triều Nguyễn thế kỷ 19 (bên trên) và kiếm vàng “An dân bảo kiếm” năm Khải Định (1916-1925) ở bên dưới.

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Ảnh: Ngọc Thắng

Kiếm vàng. Triều Nguyễn. TK 19. Epée impériale d’apparat, or et jade, 0,58kg. Dynastie des Nguyễn. 19ème siècle.

Kiếm vàng “An dân bảo kiếm”. Triều Nguyễn, năm Khải Định (1916-1925). Epée de l’empereur Khải Định (1916-1925).

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Ảnh: Tiến Thành

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L’empereur Khai Dinh, portant cette épée, et son fils, le prince Vinh Thuy, à Paris en 1922.

Chén ngọc, chậu vàng, sách vàng. Service à thé en jade, bassin et livre en or

Chén ngọc bịt vàng nặng 1,1kg. Tasse en jade à monture or. Poids total: 1,1 kg.

Théière en jade cerclée d’or. Dynastie des Nguyễn.

Bộ chén ngọc khảm vàng triều Nguyễn. Service à thé en jade et or. Dynastie des Nguyễn.

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Chậu vàng của triều Nguyễn, năm Duy Tân 5 (1911), trọng lượng 1,4 kg. Bassin en or, 1,4 kg. Dynastie des Nguyễn, cinquième année de Duy Tân (1911)

Ảnh: Ngọc Thắng

Đài vàng cẩn ngọc triều Nguyễn thế kỷ 19. Boîte à offrandes en or et pierres précieuses. Dynastie des Nguyễn, 19ème siècle.

Cuốn sách vàng chế tác năm Gia Long thứ 5 (1806) có trọng lượng 2,1 kg. Livre en or, 2,1 kg. Dynastie des Nguyễn, cinquième année de Gia Long (1806).

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Ảnh: Tiến Thành

Ảnh: BTLS

english version

 Bao Hoang Cung”, “Imperial Treasures” “Imperial Treasures”

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MU vang trieu Nguyen. Gold copings of the Nguyen Dynasty

MU Vang. Trieu Nguyen, TK 19. 26.7 x17cm. C: 17.8 cm. Trong Luong: 720g. Cap gold (720 grams), Nguyen Dynasty, 19th century.

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The Emperor Khai Định.

MU Vang. Trieu Nguyen, TK 19. Trong Luong: 660g. Cap gold (660 grams) and diamonds, Nguyen Dynasty, 19th century

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MU Vang. Trieu Nguyen, TK 19. 26.7 x17cm. C: 17.8 cm. Trong Luong: 720g. Cap gold (720 grams), Nguyen Dynasty, 19th century.

.

 

 

Duy Tan Vua. The Emperor Duy Tan

Duy Tan Vua. The emperor

Duy Tan REUR

An, Nguyen trieu kiem vang – Seals and swords of the Nguyen Dynasty

You Trai four Phai: An vang “menhir Bag chi bao” boom vang nang rong 8.5 kg, 8 Đức Nam Minh Mang (1827);

 year Ngọc “Djaya Thu Thien Nam Vinh Quoc Truyen menhir ty” cua Nguyen trieu; year “Quoc gia tin bao” boom vang Đức, Nang gan 5 kg vao Nien hieu Gia Long.

Year vang “menhir Bag chi bao”. Đức thang nam Minh Menhir 10 8 (1827). Trong Luong: 8500 Gr Gold Seal of Emperor Minh Minh Mang, 1827, weight: 8500 grams.

Anh: BTLS

An “menhir Bag chi bao” gom 2 course, co Hinh Vuong, tren Có Hinh rong đầu Nganga, sung dai 2, Dai Hinh đuôi XOE 9 ngon lua, lung year dong chu Han Khac Hai “Thap Nhi Hoang Kim killed Bách nhi tam thap luc lang yours – Minh Mang Nien thap bat Nguyet Cát Nhat Tao. ” (Vang 10 Tuoi lang nang 223 6 yours – Đức Ngaye lanh thang vao Nam thu 10 8 Minh Mang, 1827).

Anh: Tien Thanh

Photo of antique gold seal of Emperor Minh Mang.

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An “Quoc gia tin bao” Đức bang vang, Nang gan 5 kg vao Nien hieu Gia Long. – Anh: Tien Thanh. Gold seal (about 5kg) of Emperor Gia Long.

Year Ngọc “Djaya Thu Thien Nam Vinh Quoc Truyen menhir ty.” Trieu Nguyen. Jade seal. DesNguyễn dynasty, 19th century.

 

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Anh: Tien Thanh

 

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Kiem Nguyen The Ky Vang trieu 19 (ben TREN) will kiem vang “An dan bao Kiem” Nam Khai Định (1916-1925) o Bên dưới.

Anh Ngoc Thang

Kiem vang. Trieu Nguyen. TK 19. Sword imperial ceremonial, gold and jade, 0.58 kg. Nguyen Dynasty. The 19th century.

Kiem vang “An dan bao Kiem”. Trieu Nguyen, Nam Khai Định (1916-1925). Sword of Emperor Khai Định (1916-1925).

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Ảnh: Ngọc Thắng

Kiếm vàng. Triều Nguyễn. TK 19. Epée impériale d’apparat, or et jade, 0,58kg. Dynastie des Nguyễn. 19ème siècle.

Kiếm vàng “An dân bảo kiếm”. Triều Nguyễn, năm Khải Định (1916-1925). Epée de l’empereur Khải Định (1916-1925).

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Ảnh: Tiến Thành

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Anh: Tien Thanh

The Emperor Khai Dinh, bearing the sword, and his son, Prince Vinh Thuy in Paris in 1922.

Chén Ngoc Chau vang, know vang. Tea jade, gold basin and book

Chén Ngọc bit nang vang 1.1 kg. Jade cup mount gold. Total weight: 1.1 kg.

Jade teapot rimmed with gold. Nguyen Dynasty.

BO Chén Ngọc trieu Kham Vang Nguyen. Tea jade and gold. Nguyen Dynasty.

Anh: Tien Thanh

Cua vang trieu Chau Nguyen, Nam Duy Tan 5 (1911), Trong Luong 1.4 kg. Basin of gold, 1.4 kg. Nguyen Dynasty, the fifth year of Duy Tan (1911)

Anh Ngoc Thang

Djaya vang Cdn Ngọc trieu Nguyen The Ky 19. Offering box in gold and precious stones. Nguyen Dynasty, 19th century.

Cuon sach nam vang market tat thu 5 Gia Long (1806) co Trong Luong 2.1 kg. Book of gold, 2.1 kg. Nguyen Dynasty, Gia Long of the fifth year (1806).

Anh: Tien Thanh

Anh: Tien Thanh

Anh: BTLS

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Sélection de cartes postales anciennes sur Huê

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Annam, Huê. Les musiciens du Roi jouant sous le soleil du Portique Radieux

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Annam, Huê. Elephant caparaçonné contenant la foule pendant les fêtes

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Huê (Annam). Porte monumentale, dite Hien Dhon(?)

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de l’empereur Dông Khanh

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Annam, Huê. Chef des Makouis et ses satellites. Scène diabolique jouée au Palais

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Annam, Huê. Les deux Reines par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Thiên Tri (Temple de la Lumière)

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Annam, Huê. Porte d’entrée du Co Mât

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Annam, Huê. Tibunes Cavalier du Roi, vue des jardins

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Minh Mang (Temple de la Lumière)

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Tu Duc (Temple de la Stèle)

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Annam, Huê. Annam, Huê. Porte du Palais Co Mât par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Temple des Edits

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Annam, Huê. Eléphants traversant une rivière.

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Annam, Huê. Rotissage d’un boeuf

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Annam, Huê. Allée des Portiques de droite conduisant au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Les Corbeilles de Fleurs

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Annam, Huê. Groupe de femmes annamites par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Le tombeau de Gia Long (la triple enceinte) par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Ensemble des cours et pagodes du tombeau de Minh Mang par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Cours et pagodes au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Pagode où se font les cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Porte de l’enceinte extérieure au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Groupe d’ennuques par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Palais du Prince Tuyên Hoà, frère du Roi par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Cours et pagode au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Une colonne commémorative au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. La Montagne du Roi et le Cercle de la Rive Droite par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Le Cavalier du roi, vu de la Trbune

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Annam, Huê. Palais de l’Empereur. Le Trône

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Tu Duc

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Annam, Huê. La fête du Nam Giao en 1933

Portrait de l’Empereur Bao Dai par le Studio Harcourt

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Portrait de l’Empereur Bao Dai par le Studio Harcourt

Cette photo, en tirage argentiquen de format 18 x 24 cm, a été proposée à 100 € + 5 € d’envoi et n’a pas trouvé preneur ce jour.

  

 

‘Arts of Ancient Viet Nam: From River Plain to Open Sea’ @ Asia Society Museum, New York

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Vietnam, Charger with Dragon, Late 15th Century. Stoneware

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Asia Society, New York, offer an unprecedented exhibition of art from ancient Viet Nam—the first U.S. exhibition to address in depth the historical, geographic and cultural contexts of precolonial Vietnamese art. Throughout its long history, Viet Nam served as a central hub for trade routes connecting the regions of Asia and the West, with travelers and merchants traversing its long open plains, and trade vessels from as far west as India and Rome finding safe haven in its harbors. Arts of Ancient Viet Nam: From River Plain to Open Sea will introduce new scholarship on the history of Vietnamese art.

Approximately 110 objects dating from the first millennium B.C. through the 17th century, on rare loan from Viet Nam´s leading museums, will be on view. Highlights of the exhibition include ritual bronzes, terracotta burial wares, fine gold jewelry, Hindu and Buddhist sculptures, and ornaments made of jade, lapis lazuli, crystal and carnelian. The works have never before been exhibited.

Independent scholar Nancy Tingley is curator of the exhibition. Christine Starkman, MFAH Curator of Asian Art, serves as in-house curator for the show in Houston. In New York, Adriana Proser, Asia Society´s John H. Foster Curator for Traditional Asian Art, is in-house curator.

A full color, 356-page catalogue is available at AsiaStore.

February 2 – May 2, 2010 @ Asia Society Museum, New York

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Drum, Dong Son period, 5th–3rd century BCE, Hoang (Mieu Mon) Village, My Duc District, Ha Tay Province. Bronze. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 5724 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Halberd, Dong Son period, 1st century BCE–1st century CE, Hai Phong City, Kien An District, Hai Phong Province. Bronze. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 1408 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Chicken-headed Ewer (Han type), Dong Son period, 1st–3rd century CE. Glazed stoneware. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 15062 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Burial Urn with Cover, Sa Huynh culture, 4th–2nd century BCE. An Bang site, Hoi An District, Quang Nam Province. Earthenware. Hoi An Center for Monument Management and Preservation, Cl(AB)95 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Bicephalous Ear Ornament, Sa Huynh culture, 3rd–1st century BCE. Giong Ca Vo site, Ho Chi Minh City, Can Gio District, Ho Chi Minh Province. Nephrite. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 13619 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Pangolin. Long Gio, Long Khanh district, Dong Nai Province. 3rd century BCE–2nd century AD. Bronze. Dong Nai Museum, LG24. Photo by Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, © Dong Nai Museum

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Vietnam, Female, c. 5th Century. Da Nang Museum of Cham Sculpture. Stone

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Ekamukhalinga, Fu Nan period, 6th century. Oc Eo site, My Lam Village, An Giang Province. Stone. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 5532 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Three Intaglio, Fu Nan period, ca. 6th century. Oc Eo site, My Lam Village, An Giang Province. Carnelian and crystal. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 2248, BTLS 2258, BTLS 2253 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Vietnam, “Simhamukha” Architectural Ornament, 6th Century. Terra Cotta

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Vietnam, Kneeling Figure Making Offering, 6th Century. Bronze

 

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Vietnam, Vishnu, 6th-7th Century. Stone

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Lintel, Fu Nan period, late 7th century. Thuy Lieu Village, An Giang Province. Stone. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 5977 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Vishnu, Fu Nan period, 7th century. Tan Phu site, Tan Hoi Village, An Giang Province. Bronze. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 1585 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Viet Nam, Male Divinity, 7th Century. Stone

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Lotus. Fu Nan period, 7th–8th century. Go Xoai site, Duc Hoa District, Long An Province. Gold foil. Long An Museum, BT87-M1-V-2. (Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco) © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

 

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Three Elephants Fu Nan period, 7th–8th century. Go Xoai site, Duc Hoa District, Long An Province. Gold sheet. Long An Museum, BT87-M1-I-3 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Surya. Fu Nan period, 7th–8th century. Ba The Village, An Giang Province. Stone. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 5527 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Pedestal. Champa period, 8th–9th century. Van Trach Hoa Village, Phong Dien District, Thua Thien Hue Province. Stone. Thua Thien Hue Historical and Revolutionary Museum, TTH 2813/D99 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Viet Nam, Seated Bodhisattva, 9th Century.

 

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Vietnam, Dharmapala, 9th Century. Stone

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Viet Nam, Nataraja, 10th Century. Stone

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Relief of Figure Making Offering. Champa period, late 10th century. Stone. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 5906 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Vietnam, Female Figure, 11th Century. Stone

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Dancer, Champa period, 11th century. Tra Kieu site, Quang Nam Province. Sandstone. Hue Royal Antiquities Museum, DKC 44 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Vietnam, Vishnu, 11th Century. Stone

 

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Vietnam, Garuda with Naga, Late 12th — 13th century. Stone

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Kinnara, Champa period, late 12th–13th century, Thap Mam site, Binh Dinh Province. Stone. Hue Royal Antiquities Museum, DKC 33 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Lion, Champa period, late 12th–13th century, Thap Mam site, Binh Dinh Province. Stone. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 21187 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Large Basin, Ly–Tran dynasty, 12th–14th century, Thanh Hoa Province. Glazed stoneware. Viet Nam National Fine Arts Museum, 4975-G2-1851 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Ewer, Late 15th century, Chu Dau kiln, Cu Lao Cham shipwreck. Stoneware painted with underglaze cobalt blue and remnants of overglaze enamel. Museum of Vietnamese History, Ho Chi Minh City, BTLS 16997 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Pair of Nghe. Late Le dynasty, 16th–17th century, Bat Trang kiln. Glazed stoneware. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 13572, LSb 13573 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Lime Pot, 15th century. Glazed stoneware. Viet Nam National Fine Arts Museum, CDA-5/04-4599 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Hoang Nguu and Nguyen Phong Lai, Lamp Stand. 24th day, 6th month, 3rd year of Dien Thanh’s reign (1580). Nghia Lu Commune, Cam Giang District, Hai Duong Province. Stoneware painted with underglaze cobalt blue. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 13771 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Incense Burner and Pair of Lamps. Early 17th century, North Viet Nam. Glazed stoneware. National Museum of Vietnamese History, Ha Noi, LSb 12834, LSb 17251, LSb 15407 © Kaz Tsuruta, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

L’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam

The Order of the Dragon of Annam: founded by Emperor Dong Khanh on 14th March 1886. Awarded in five classes (1. Grand Cordon, 2. Grand Officer, 3. Commander, 4. Officer, and 5. Knight) with two ribbons (red with gold border stripes by the Emperor, and green with gold border stripes by the French President).

OrderofDragonofAnnam1OrderofDragonofAnnam1

The Order of the Dragon – Grand Cordon, breast star

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The Order of the Dragon – Officer, breast badge with “colonial ribbon”

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Croix de chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (face et dos) (photo e-bay)

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Croix de chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (photo e-bay)

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Diplôme de Chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (1875)

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Croix de chevalier (au dos : ovale alu collé : La Gerbe d’Or, CHAPUS 86 rue de Rivoli Paris) (photo ebay)

Deux nouvelles photos de l”Empereur Khai Dinh

Visite de l’Empereur Khai Dinh au Palais

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Arrivée de l’Empereur Khai Dinh au Palais Kien Trung

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Rare Album artisanal d’un recueil de 20 photographies couvrant le couronnement de l’empereur Bao-Dai le 8 janvier 1928

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Rare Album artisanal d’un recueil de 20 photographies couvrant le couronnement de l’empereur Bao-Dai le 8 janvier 1928

the rare album of 20 photograpies emperor Bodai January,8th.1928

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This work was carried out by the school in Hue, Vinh Tang rue Paul Bert. Black and white prints in the format 11.8 x 17cm. The legends made ​​on a paper strip added below. The 20 photographs are:
1 Arrive in Hue S.A Prince Vinh Thuy-
2 Arriving at the palace of Prince
3 Reception of the Prince by the court
4 ceremony of prostration
5 s.m Bao Dai went to the palace
6 Arrival at the Palace
7 Arrival of the Governor Mr. Varenne
8 European Assistance
9 Position of the mandarins before making Thai Hoa Lays Deaver
10 Lays of the 2nd phase
11 The mandarins of lower rank to its knees
12 After the enthronement SM Bao Dai returned to the palace
13 Out of HM Bao Dai in a litter by the Golden Gate
14 Bao Dai wins walk Mieu Pagoda Tea
15 SM in position for Lays in the Pagoda Tea Mieu
SM 16 out of the pagoda, hailed the Regent vparr SE
17 Return of the pagoda

 

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bjkweb

 

Art du Champa : Site de My Son

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Site de My Son. Fouilles de Henri Parmentier et de Charles Carpeaux en 1903-1904, mise en place d’un palan (photothèque EFEO, PAR01584, cliché H. Parmen

Restauration de la plus vieille maison communale du Vietnam à Hà Tây

La province de Hà Tây (Nord) a récemment commencé la restauration de la plus ancienne maison communale du pays. Construite au 16e siècle, la maison communale de Thuy Phiêu, dans la commune de Thuy An, district de Ba Vi, sera rénovée pendant un an. Coût des travaux: 7 milliards de dôngs. Cette maison communale est dédiée au culte de Tan Viên, un des 4 génies les plus puissants de la mythologie vietnamienne. (CVN)La cathédrale de Phat Diêm ou qu’est-ce que l’acculturation ?

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La cathédrale de Phat Diêm, province de Ninh Binh (Nord), à 121 km au sud de Hanoi, a été à l’époque de la colonisation française un haut lieu du catholicisme dans le Nord. Mais, plus encore, c’est là l’un des premiers exemples architecturaux de l’acculturation qui a eu lieu au cours de cette période.
Il y a quelques semaines de cela maintenant, Alain J. Lemaître, docteur en ethnologie, en histoire et en lettres, maître de conférences en histoire moderne à l’Université de Haute Alsace, donnait à l’occasion de la Journée internationale de la Francophonie une conférence sur l’acculturation. Ce terme né dans le champ de l’ethnologie décrit “l’ensemble des phénomènes résultant d’un contact continu entre 2 groupes culturels différents provoquant des changements dans les 2 groupes”.

Dans la perspective coloniale, ces phénomènes étaient perçus comme unidirectionnels puisque l’idée dominante était celle d’une suprématie de la culture européenne. Ainsi, seule la culture indigène se modifierait au contact de la culture des colonisateurs, ne faisant que reproduire tels quels les us et coutumes de celle-ci. Cependant, suite à la décolonisation et à l’indépendance des peuples, l’ethnologie a réajusté cette notion en intégrant l’idée d’une bidimensionnalité aux échanges culturels, idée qui fait aujourd’hui consensus au sein de la communauté scientifique. Lors d’un contact continu entre 2 groupes, il n’y a pas seulement intégration d’une nouvelle culture mais aussi maintien de la culture d’origine qui produit un impact sur la manière dont se fait l’acculturation et sur son résultat.

La situation de l’Asie au moment de la colonisation était de plus particulière. En effet, l’Europe rencontre alors des civilisations millénaires qui connaissent l’écriture (depuis même plus longtemps qu’elle) et qui, par conséquent, ont une mémoire écrite. Ce fut là une différence capitale avec, par exemple, les civilisations de l’Amérique du Sud. De culture majoritairement orale, elles se montrèrent beaucoup moins résistantes au contact d’une autre culture, et ce d’autant plus que celle-ci fut imposée par la force. Ainsi, si certains pays d’Amérique du Sud, tels que le Pérou, une partie du Mexique et du Guatemala, conservent des traits très forts de leur culture originelle, la plupart des autres ne présentent que de très rares éléments autochtones comme c’est le cas par exemple au Chili. Une autre différence qui fait la particularité de l’Asie à cette époque réside dans la manière dont les contacts entre les cultures se sont effectués. Les colonies en Asie ne furent pas des colonies de peuplement. Les Européens procédèrent par l’établissement de comptoirs qui laissaient de côté des territoires immenses et très peuplés. Les contacts avec la culture occidentale étaient ainsi indirects et laissaient une plus grande marge de manœuvre aux indigènes, susceptibles d’assimiler plus librement les éléments de la culture dominante.

Durant la colonisation française au Vietnam, il y eut effectivement acculturation. Toutefois, cela n’a pas seulement conduit à l’intégration de la culture européenne mais aussi, fort heureusement, au maintien de la culture indigène. L’architecture de la cathédrale de Phat Diêm est l’une des premières manifestations de ce phénomène culturel.

Un exemple architectural d’acculturation
Haut lieu du catholicisme dans le Nord à l’époque de la colonisation française, la division du pays en 1954 entraîna le départ en masse vers le Sud de catholiques et la fermeture du sanctuaire. Ce qui est appelée “cathédrale de Phat Diêm” regroupe en fait de nombreux édifices dont la construction fut achevée en 1891. L’ensemble fut fondé par un prêtre vietnamien du nom de Six dont le tombeau se trouve sur le parvis de la cathédrale, bâtiment principal. Tout autour se dressent plusieurs sortes de chapelles, chacune dédiée à un saint. Cependant, si en visitant ce lieu de culte catholique, vous vous attendez à retrouver les grandes tours qui font la caractéristique de ces bâtiments, vous repartirez déçus. Tout en pierre, aux toits incurvés semblables à ceux d’une pagode, l’architecture de ce lieu s’inspire largement de celle des temples bouddhistes. Le mélange des 2 cultures est ici indéniable.

Le prêtre Six a veillé à représenter les éléments principaux du village vietnamien, à savoir la maison communale, l’étang et l’arbre nourricier tandis qu’un clocher, élément indispensable à tout lieu de culte catholique s’élève à l’arrière de la cathédrale. Toutefois, au premier étage de ce clocher, on retrouve un tambour de taille imposante, instrument utilisé pour sonner l’heure dans la religion bouddhiste. Au second étage, est suspendue une cloche, forgée toutefois selon le modèle oriental. Elle possède 4 points de contacts pour sonner l’heure, un par saison. Chacune d’elles est identifiée par un sinogramme tandis qu’un chant de prière est inscrit sur celle-ci en langue latine. Quatre petites tours se dressent à chaque coin du bâtiment, chacune surmontée d’une représentation d’un saint. Toutefois, alors que ceux-ci sont traditionnellement représentés debout, ici, ils sont assis à la manière du Bouddha.

Quittons la cathédrale pour entrer dans l’une des nombreuses chapelles entourant celle-ci. Les traces de l’influence de la culture européenne se mêlant à celle sino-vietnamienne demeurent. Au fond de la chapelle, se dresse un autel de pierre surmonté d’une statue de la Vierge Marie. Les bas-reliefs sur la face frontale de cet autel présentent les symboles occidentaux de la pureté : un jardin ainsi qu’un puits fermés. Les faces latérales quant à elles, sont gravées de fleurs de lotus, représentation de cette même idée de pureté dans l’imaginaire oriental.

L’importance d’une politique culturelle
L’architecture sino-vietnamienne d’inspiration européenne de ce bâtiment n’est qu’un des nombreux exemples de l’impact de la culture européenne sur la culture vietnamienne lors de la colonisation. Cela montre toutefois que, dans le cas du Vietnam, la culture indigène n’a pas été détruite mais maintenue. Ceci s’explique pour une grande part, par sa tradition de culture écrite qui a permis de forger une identité collective forte, c’est-à-dire un ensemble de caractères qui unissent les hommes et femmes d’un même groupe mais qui les distinguent également des autres groupes.

Ainsi, quelle que soit la force de l’acculturation sur un plan économique et même social, le fait qu’il existe une culture écrite permettant de forger une identité collective forte, autorise un échange entre les cultures (échange au demeurant toujours inégal) et non une destruction de celles-ci. Toutefois, aujourd’hui, peut-être plus qu’hier, la culture est intiment liée au domaine économique, facilitant d’autant la destruction de systèmes culturels.

D’où la nécessité pour chaque pays de défendre celle-ci par une politique culturelle capable de faire face aux enjeux de la mondialisation. Tel est l’objectif de la convention pour la promotion et la protection de la diversité culturelle, établie par l’UNESCO en octobre 2005. L’importance des enjeux soulevés par ce traité est largement reconnue au niveau international puisque depuis lors, il a été signé et ratifié par 56 pays et l’Union européenne (en tant qu’unité régionale). Le fait que les États-Unis, dont le secteur culturel occupe une place majeure dans l’économie américaine, s’oppose à son adoption lors du vote à l’UNESCO, ne fait que confirmer cette idée. (Anaïs Chavanne /CVN

 

Document à l’entête de la “MAISON DE L’EMPEREUR . CABINET DU GRAND-MAÎTRE DES CEREMONIES “

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Document à l’entête de la “MAISON DE L’EMPEREUR . CABINET DU GRAND-MAÎTRE DES CEREMONIES “- “A PARIS , le ? 186?”
“Reçu une lettre de son ? le Grand Maître de Cérémonie de l’Empereur” – “Le 1er ambassadeur de S.M. le roi d’Annam” – Signature calligraphique de Phan Thanh Giang.
(Etat: pli horizontal marqué et bords poussiéreux) – prti à 136 € + 1,20 €

-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Trésor, 1952 & Le Marché de Tân Dinh, 1953

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Sud-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Trésor, 1952

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 Sud-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Marché de Tân Dinh, 1953

Annam, Huê. Vue sur la Pagode des Cantonais

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Annam, Huê. Vue sur la Pagode des Cantonais

 Annam, Huê. Eléphants royaux à l’entrée du Palais.

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Annam, Huê. Eléphants royaux à l’entrée du Palais.

 Annam. Montagnes de marbre près Tourane – Chef ou Pape des bonzes

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Annam. Montagnes de marbre près Tourane – Chef ou Pape des bonzes

Annam, Huê. Gardiennes et servantes chargées des Cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Thiêu Tri.

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Annam, Huê. Gardiennes et servantes chargées des Cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Thiêu Tri.

 ANNAM. Obséques de SM KHAI DINH. Acteurs, 1925

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Annam. Obséques de SM Khai Dinh. Acteurs, 1925

 “Intronisation de S.M. Bao Dai dernier Empereur d’ANNAM – Musique traditionnelle au Palais Thai Hoà” le 08 janvier 1926

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“Intronisation de S.M. Bao Dai  dernier Empereur d’ANNAM -  Musique traditionnelle au Palais Thai Hoà” le 08 janvier 1926 

Annam. Mandarin rendant la justice.

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Annam. Mandarin rendant la justice

PHOTO OF THE DELEGATION OF PHAN THANH GIAN IN PARIS IN 1863 BY Disdéri.
 

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Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mandarins who participated in the peace treaty

Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,

Albumen print, 24 x 28 cm.

A photograph of Disdéri (catalog No. 104, albumen print, 24 x 28 cm, Disderi stamp on the carton, estimate € 1000/1200) will be sold at the Galerie de Chartres May 7, 2011. It represents a group portrait, “Mandarins who participated in the peace treaty in Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,” the delegation is sent to Saigon by Emperor Tu Duc to negotiate the peace treaty of 1862.

By the treaty signed June 5, 1862 and ratified on 16 April 1863 Hue, Vietnam cedes to France the three eastern provinces (Gia Dinh, Bien Hoa and My Tho) and the islands of Con Dao (Pulo Condor) opens three ports (including Da Nang) to trade between France and Spain, will pay a war indemnity of four million dollars and finally tolerate the freedom of Christian worship. The two principal ambassadors were then Phan Thanh Gian Lam Duy and Tiep. We know that during their stay in Saigon, Vice-Admiral Bonard had been photographed and the photographs had been the model for the engravings published in L’Illustration of November 29, 1862 bearing the words “from the photographs provided by M. Rigault, corresponding Vice-Admiral Bonard. “

Detail. Signatures of ambassadors

Disdéri of photography.

Three inscriptions in Chinese characters found on the carton assembly, between photography and Disderi stamp, bearing the names of three ambassadors:

Center: 正 使 潘清 简 Phan Thanh Gian chanh knew, “the first ambassador, HE Phan Thanh Gian (1796-1867)”

Right: 副使 笵 富庶 Pho Phu Pham Thu knew “Vice-Ambassador Pham Phu Thu”

Left: 陪 使 魏克 袒 boi knew Nguỵ Khac Djan, “Deputy Ambassador Nguy Khac Dan.”

Thus, it is not coming from the embassy in Saigon negotiate the Treaty of 1862 (ratified in Hue in April 1863), but the embassy that was from the Emperor Tu Duc in July 1863, under the pretext of thanking the gifts sent by Napoleon III, to negotiate the purchase of the three eastern provinces.

The delegation left Saigon on July 4, 1863 a French warship to reach Suez August 17th where she embarked on the Labrador to win Toulon on September 10. She arrived in Paris on September 13 and was received by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, M. Feuillet de Conches on the 18th September, on behalf of the emperor who was on holiday in Biarritz.

At the request of the Emperor Napoleon III, Jacques-Philippe Potteau (1807-1876), who was the successor of Louis Rousseau at the Natural History Museum and devoted himself to scientific and ethnographic photography, was designated to capture the photographic portrait the ambassador and his entourage. At the first meeting (September 20, 1863), he made two portraits of Ambassador Phan Thanh Gian, one sitting, the other foot (currently kept at the Laboratory of Anthropology of the Museum of Natural History in Paris, No. 10,608 and No. 10,610), one of Pham Phu Thu, one of Nguy Khac Dan and a group. These portraits were presented at the meeting of December 15, 1863.

Jacques-Philippe Potteau, Portrait of HE Phan Thanh Gian.

Laboratory of Anthropology Museum of Natural History, Paris.

In the Journal of the embassy, ​​Pham Phu Thu noted:

“At ngo (noon), the sky became a little calm. Dressed in the costume of the court, one by one we went to the floor of the hotel which is covered with glass, and we shoot we did. Here is the essence of photography: first we take a glass plate covered with a combination of liquids: it is placed behind a glass tube, before which stands the person who looks inside of the opposite tube, under the action of sunlight coming through the tube, the glass plate receives the impression of an image, there is not even a hair of difference. The Europeans used to do this operation with great desire. All those with whom we just want to know talk to you a portrait of the upper and lower are all the same, saying they see is the testimony of a memory reciprocal.

In the following, under the conduct of the staff, photographers often came with their camera to the hotel and invited us to shoot us, they gave us each a copy of these portraits. After the draw, each of the small amounts to a huge portraits, price of labor, those who are slightly larger cost 4 or 5 francs “(Pham Phu Thu, (trans. Tran Xuan Toan),” The Embassy of Phan Than Gian (1863-1864) “BAVH, 1921, p. 156.)

Thus, after Jacques-Philippe Potteau, Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri (1819-1889) was one of the photographers who were invited to capture the features of the Ambassador and the delegation. The photograph will be on sale May 7, 2011 Chartres was performed on this occasion.

In 1854, Disdéri invented a new camera which lets you play six shots on the same glass plate and patented the format of the card whose paternity of the invention is to be attributed either to Marseille Dodero Aguado. The fashion for portraits-cost cards spread rapidly in France.

In the Journal of the Embassy, ​​Pham Phu Thu noted that: “The 20th Day (1 November 1863) it rained. At vi (from 1 to 3 pm), Mr. Cam-ba-xa-the GIO, French Minister of Rites [Author's note: This is the Grand Master of Ceremonies], we did bring in an official letter which stated that “At vi (from 1 to 3 pm) the 24th day, he would take us, and in the middle of the same vi hours, we came to the Royal Court of France. “Soon after, Mr. Ha-ba-ly [Author's note: this is Mr. Aubaret, Commander, Officer of Foreign Affairs, who served as interpreter during the stay of the mission in France.] Brought us three cards and said that the Minister of Rites did convey his compliments to the three of us. At nightfall, he returned and took us three cards in response to the compliments of the Minister “(Pham Phu Thu (trans. Tran Xuan Toan),” The Embassy of Phan Thanh Gian, 1863-1864, “Bulletin Friends of Old Hue, 1921, No. 1-4, pp. 266-267).

Document signed by Phan Thanh Gian

Personal collection.

In October 2007, a document dated 01st November 1863, was sold on ebay. This is a certificate signed by the hand of Phan Thanh Gian confirming the receipt of a letter from the Grand Master of Ceremonies of the Emperor.

Phan Thanh Gian signatures

Left: on the document to the head of the Cabinet of the Emperor

Right: the photograph of Disdéri.

By comparing this signature with that appearing in the photograph of Disdéri, it is undeniable that this is the manual signature of Phan Thanh Gian. This photograph had to be carried out between November and December 1863.

The reception of the ambassadors of Annam was held November 7 at a public hearing at the Palais des Tuileries, after the return of the Empress Eugenie of Spain, where she was visiting her family. The emperor was not opposed to negotiations. He relied on the payment of 85 million promised by the king of Annam to offset the deficit of 972 million francs. After the reception, the negotiations began, and November 12, Le Moniteur Universal announced that the peace treaty of June 5, 1862 would be amended. Once his mission is completed, Phan Thanh Gian left France carrying with him his photographic portraits by Jacques-Philippe Potteau (01st November 1863) and Adolphe Eugene Disdéri (November-December 1863) and by other photographers.

Details: Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mandarins who participated in the treated

Peace in Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,

Albumen print

ORIGINAL INFO IN fRENCH

PHOTO DE LA DELEGATION DE PHAN THANH GIAN A PARIS EN 1863 PAR DISDERI.

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__KGrHqJ__lQE5YyoCm0wBOdid_wY____60_12

Annam, Huê. le Président du Conseil dela famille royale en costume de cour.

__KGrHqUOKj0E5_vtJom4BO_PL_EpDg___3

Annam. University Bachelor Students, 1908

The Vintage Asia Artwork Collections Part Two

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE VINTAGE ASIA ARTWORK COLLECTIONS PART TWO

The  Collection of Asian Art & Fine Japanese Works of Art

 

“The Way of the Master – The Great Artists of India, 1100–1900″ @ Museum Rietberg in Zurich

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Self-Portrait and Portraits of Artists (detail) By Daulat, Mughal, c. 1610 © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

800 years of Indian painting, about 200 masterpieces by more than 40 artists – and all this at a glance. Never before has it been possible in the West to acquaint oneself with the entire history of Indian painting at a single exhibition.

The inventiveness and colour sense of artists such as Abd al-Samad, Farrukh Beg or Nainsukh are as impressive as their names are exotic. Acclaimed by their contemporaries as “wonders of the age”, they can without hesitation be compared to Dürer, Michelangelo or Vermeer. It therefore comes as no surprise that Rembrandt also assembled a collection of Indian miniatures.

Supported by Novartis and the Schwyzer Foundation

From September 2011, this exhibition will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

1 May – 21 August 2011. Museum Rietberg Zurich

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Akbar Presents a Painting to His Father Humayun. By ‘Abd al-Samad. Mughal, probably Kabul, c. 1550–1556. © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

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Self-Portrait and Portraits of Artists By Daulat, Mughal, c. 1610 © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

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Prince Salim Enthroned. By Manohar (Portrait) and Mansur (Throne). Mughal, dated 1600/01 © The Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 2011

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Krishna playing Blindman’s Bluff. By Manaku. Pahari region, Guler, c. 1750 © The Kronos Collections

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Dialectica. By Abu’l Hasan. Overpainted engraving by Marten des Vos, after Jan Sadeler. Mughal, c. 1602/03 © The Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 2011

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Ram Singh I of Kota Pursuing a Rhinoceros. Attributed to a Kota master. Rajasthan, Kota, c. 1700 © Private Collection

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Rawat Gokul Das at a Hunting Party. By Bagta. Rajasthan, Mewar, Devgarh, dated 1808 © Trustees, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai (Formerly Prince of Wales Museum of Western India)

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Shiva, Solicitous of his Other Half. By Devidasa. Pahari region, Basohli, dated 1695 © San Diego Museum of Art

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Rupmati and Baz Bahadur Hunting. Attributed to the First Bahu Master. Pahari region, Bahu, c. 1700 © Museum Rietberg Zürich, long-term loan Barbara and Eberhard Fischer. Photo: Rainer Wolfsberger

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Chameleon. By Mansur. Mughal, c. 1595–1600. Royal Collection © 2011 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota Contemplating a Painting with the Painter Nainsukh. Attributed to Nainsukh. Pahari region, Jasrota, c. 1745–1750 © Museum Rietberg Zürich. Photo: Rainer Wolfsberger

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Ascetics in the Dandaka Forrest. Master of the First Generation after Nainsukh and Manaku. Pahari region, Kangra/Guler, c. 1780 © Museum Rietberg Zürich,

Thousand Years of the Persian Book of Kings @ Museum of Islamic Art Berlin

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Der Held Sam holt seinen. Sohn Zal vom Berg Alborz zurück. Tabriz, um 1530. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 5/82 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

BERLIN.- UNESCO has designated the year 2010 as Millennium year of the Shahname. The Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin and the Berlin National Library are seizing the opportunity to introduce this literary masterpiece to the public with their world-renowned collections of Shahname manuscripts and miniature paintings. The exhibition, on view from March 19 through July 3, 2011, communicates the history of the epic and its literary highlights, as well as the important role the Shahname for Persian national identity.

The National Epic Shahnameh by the poet Ferdausi is one of the great works of world literature. In nearly 50,000 verses, it recounts a partly mythical, partly historical past of the Iranian people right up to the Islamic conquest of Persia.

Legendary are the stories of its famous kings and heroes, especially of Rustam who so fearlessly defended the Persian kingdom in many spectacular battles against the hostile Turanians from the North. The epic also relates the important features of ideal kingship. It narrates the battle between Good and Evil, and is a constant reminder that Life is just a transitory memento. Ancient Kings of Persia figure in prominently, like Shah Ardashir I, the founder of the Sasanian Dynasty (224-239/40) or Shah Bahram V Gur, the fourteenth Sassanid King (421-438): Historical figures transformed by poetic imagination into quasi-mystical figures transformed by poetic imagination into quasi-mystical heroes. The exhibition thus confronts archaeology of these periods with the stories of those figures both historical and heroic, and sometimes mythical in the Shahnameh.

Beside a thematic show of the Shahnameh ‘through the ages’ with masterpieces of Persian painting, the exhibition presents the rich and extremely rare Sasanian collection of the Museum of Islamic Art thus illuminating the important historical past of the mythical legend.

The exhibition includes around 50 manuscripts and folios from the Keir Collection, the National Library, and the Museum of Islamic Art (amongst others the world famous folios from the yet far too little known Diez-Albums, the Great Mongol Shahnameh and the Shah Tahmasp Shahnameh) as well as medieval ceramics, textiles, metalwork and weapons plus artifacts from the Sasanian collection. These artworks are supplemented by important loans from the Berlin Museum of Asian Arts, the Berlin Museum of Ethnology and the Deutsche Historische Museum (DHM) and loans from two German private collections.

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Der Dichter Ferdausi trägt Sultan Mahmud aus dem. Schahname vor. Tabriz, um 1530. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 5/77 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

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Der mythische Köng Dschamschid lehrt die Menschen das Schmieden und Schneidern Schiraz, 823/1420. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4628, S. 12 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

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Prinz Siyavosch besteht die Feuerprobe. West Iran, 1390–1410. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Diez A fol. 71, S. 27 © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Sasanidische Jagdschale. Iran, 7. Jh. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4925 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: J. Anders

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Pferdekopf einer lebensgroßen Reiterdarstellung.. Nizamabad, 7.–1. Hälfte 8. Jh. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4886 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst

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Fliese mit der Darstellung von König Bahram Gur und Fitne. Iran, um 1900. Ethnologisches Museum, Inv.-Nr. I B 4408 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Ethnologisches Museum, Foto: M. Franken

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Rostam ringt mit Puladvand„ Kleines Diez-Schahname“. Isfahan, 1330–1335. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Diez A fol. 71, S. 45, Nr. 3 © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Der Schwarze Div Khazarvan tötet den Thronfolger des ersten Königs. Gayumars, Siyamak. Schiraz, ca. 1560–1570. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Ms. or. fol. 359, Bl. 12b © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Der Div Akvan trägt den schlafenden Rostam fort. Lithographie, Tabriz 1858 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph. Foto: U. Marzolph

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Der Div Akvan trägt den schlafenden. Rostam fort. Lithographie, Tabriz 1858 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph. Foto: U. Marzolph

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Der Wesir offenbart Ardaschir seinen Zustand Einzelblatt aus dem „Großen Mongolischen Schahname“. Tabriz, 1325–1335 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Sammlung Edmund de Unger/Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. U. 23, Foto: I. Geske

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Haftwad und der Wurm. Aus dem Dschahangir-Album. Indien, datiert 1617/18. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Libri picturati A 117, fol. 14r © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Ahriman (Goebbels), als Koch verkleidet, vor dem Tyrannen Zahhak (Hitler). Die beiden Schlangen, die aus seinen Schultern wachsen, zeigen die Gesichter Mussolinis und Tojos. Antideutsche Kriegsprogandaposter aus Iran während des zweiten Weltkriegs. London (?), 1942 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph, Foto: U. Marzolph

Treasures from Ancient China III, which will include an exceptional Pan bronze vessel decorated with a snake, from the Shang dynasty (13th-11th century B.C.), and a beautiful three-color glazed horse from the Tang Dynasty (8th century A.D.). 0_

A three-colour Horse, earthenware in sancai glaze, China, Tang Dynasty (618-907). Courtesy Galerie Christian Deydier

Early Chinese Metalwork in Gold and Silver; Works of Art of the Ming and Qing Dynasties is the title of Eskenazi Ltd.’s March exhibition, which will focus on rare and luxurious articles made for emperors, courtiers and scholars and feature exquisitely decorated pieces from the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.). The London-based dealer will show at the Ukrainian Institute, 2 East 79th Street, New York 10075. T (212) 288 8660. 0_

Silver-gilt Melon-shaped bix cover, Tang Dynasty (618-907). Courtesy Eskenazi Ltd

MD Flacks Ltd. of 32 East 57th Street will present Scholar’s Trays, as part of the gallery’s series of exhibitions that concentrates on small treasures and Scholar’s Objects. The show, believed to be the first of its kind in America, will focus on 17 examples of 17th-, 18th- and early 19th-century trays, mainly for use in the Scholar’s Studio as part of the rituals involved with burning incense, drinking tea, calligraphy and painting and thus an essential part of the Scholarly Ideal that was so venerated in China. The variety of treatments of this form offers a wide range of styles, shapes and materials. 0_

Foliate Trays, Huanghuali wood/marble, China, 17th century. Courtesy MD Flacks Ltd

Michael C. Hughes LLC will present Chinese Sculpture & Other Works of Art at Mark Murray Gallery, 39 East 72nd Street, 5th Floor. Two important highlights of this exhibition are a massive, glazed, striding Bactrian camel formerly in the collection of Bernice Richard and an extremely rare, colorful-glazed earth spirit formerly in the Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong. Both date to the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.). 18 – 26 March,  2011. 0_

Massive rare sancai and turquoise-glazed potteru earth spirit, Tang Dynasty, 8th century. Courtesy Michael C. Hughes LLC

Early Chinese Ceramics-Asian Works of Art will be presented by Andrew Kahane, Ltd. at 42 East 76th Street. Featured works will include a Chinese Longquan celadon bowl of the Southern Song Dynasty (late 12th-early 13th century) and an Indonesian gold Kala head from Eastern Java, South Malang in the late Singhasari-early Majapahit Period (13th-early 14th century). Both objects were made for court use, the first in China and the second in Java and come from Buddhist traditions. Indonesian gold Kala head from Eastern Java, South Malang in the late Singhasari-early Majapahit Period (13th-early 14th century). Courtesy Andrew Kahane Ltd

Asian Journeys: Chinese, Japanese and Korean Paintings and Ceramics, accompanied by Kaikodo Journal XXVII, will be shown by Kaikodo at 74 East 79th Street, Suite 14B, featuring Chinese, Japanese and Korean paintings along with a range of ceramics from China, Korea and Vietnam to provide the material for a grand tour through time, space and psyche, where borders might appear flung open and at other times almost impermeable. Items range from 8th-century Korean ceramics and early 13th-century Chinese paintings to 19th-century Japanese works of art. 19 March – 28 April,  2011. 0_

Large Korean Blue-and-White Dragon Jar, Joseon Dynasty, 18th century. Courtesy Kaikodo

J.J. Lally & Co. of 41 East 57th Street will exhibit Ancient Chinese Bronzes, a show of bronze vessels, figures, animals and other works of art made for ritual use or as emblems of power and status in ancient China. The finely cast and inlaid bronzes date from the Shang Dynasty (circa 1500-1050 B.C.) through the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.).

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An Archaic Bronze Taotie Mask, early Western Zhou Dynasty, 10th-9th  c. BC. Courtesy J.J. Lally & Co.

Contemporary Chinese Ink Paintings, Featuring Lotus Paintings by Shi Ze will be shown at M. Sutherland Fine Arts, Ltd., 55 East 80th Street, 2nd Floor. Shi Ze (born 1960, Beijing) first showed at the gallery in 2003. His works now, as then, are fresh and untrammeled views of the important Buddhist symbol of purity, the lotus and uses techniques and materials from traditional Chinese ink, Western oil and Tibetan thanka painting.

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Shi Ze (born 1960, Beijing), Pink Lotus on Blue Background, 2010. Courtesy Sutherland Fine Arts, Ltd

The John Menke Collection of Vietnamese Ceramics will be on view at Zetterquist Galleries, 3 East 66th Street, Suite 1B. The encyclopedic collection from the Dong Son Culture (700-43 B.C.) through the 17th century was assembled over more than 40 years by the eminent scientist, John Menke. Zetterquist Galleries has selected more than 50 pieces for their historical importance and beauty and will offer a rare opportunity to view together 17 centuries of the Vietnamese ceramic tradition. Many of the works in this exhibition have been published in major Vietnamese ceramics books in the U.S. and Europe over the last two decades.

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Four Islands plate, Vietnam, 16th century. Courtesy Zetterquist Galleries

Ralph M. Chait Galleries will also participate in Asia Week New York 2011; exhibition information was unavailable at this writing. Details will be available in the coming weeks. 19 – 26 March,  2011, Mon – Sat    10 – 6pm. 724 Fifth Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10019. T (212) 397 2818 – F (212) 319 0471 -0_

Fine Imperial Chinese Blue and White Mallet Vase (1662-1722). Courtesy Ralph M. Chait Galleries

Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art and Antiques Also among the AADNY exhibitors this year are 15 dealers of Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian art and antiques. Viewers will find a treasure of paintings, textiles, jewels, bronzes and other metal pieces and much more dating from the second century A.D. to the 18th century.

Leiko Coyle Asian Art will exhibit Recent Acquisitions at 311 East 72nd Street, Suite 15E. The show will include an extensive collection of Tibetan thangkas dating from the 14th-19th centuries. Highlights from the collection include an 18th-century, large-scale painting of the Buddha Amitayus commissioned in 1778 by the Qianlong Emperor to honor the visit of the sixth Panchen Lama. Also on view will be three-dimensional works in bronze, wood and stone from Tibet, Nepal, and India.

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Buddha Amitayus, 1779-1780, from the Xumifushou Temple, Chengdu, China. Courtesy Leiko Coyle Asian Art

From the Himalayan Regions: Sculptures, Tangkas and Textiles is the exhibition to be presented by Carlo Cristi of Italy at AFP Galleries, 41 East 57th Street, Suite 702. It will feature fine collections of Tibetan paintings ranging from the 13th-17th centuries, Nepalese and Indian bronzes dating from the 10th-12th centuries and Central Asian textiles dating from the 6th-10th centuries along with needle loop embroideries of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644 A.D.). 09

Wooden tablet painted with Amitabha flanked by boddhisatvas. Tibet, 13th century, wood, pigments. Courtesy Carlo Cristi

Also traveling from Italy is Dalton Somaré from Milan. Early Indo-Buddhist Art will be shown at Pace Gallery, 32 East 57th Street, 7th Floor, and will include very early works of art from the Indian Subcontinent. Among them is an Anthropomorph copper figure from the Gangetic Planes (2nd Millennium B.C.), impressive for its size, as well as several stone images of the Indus Gods Vishnu and Shiva from different periods (6th-11th centuries) from India and Nepal. Also on view will be Himalayan and Indian Buddhist bronzes, including an extremely fine 11th-century Pala Padmapani.

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Manjusti Boddhisatva, Tibet, 15th centuiry. Gilt copper, semiprecious stones,,pigments. Courtesy Dalton Somaré

John Eskenazi Ltd. of London will offer Recent Acquisitions at Adam Williams Fine Art Ltd, 24 East 80th Street. A particular highlight of the show is a charming terracotta fragment of Dancing Shiva from 5th/6thcentury Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, originally part of a rectangular panel that occupied a ghanadvara (solid aperture) on a temple wall. Both joyful and thoughtful, the image is one of the most easily recognized forms in Indian art and, in this early example, Shiva dances for the delight of his fellow gods.

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The birth of Buddha.. Eastern India, 6th century, terracotta. Courtesy John Eskenazi Ltd

Indian Miniature Paintings from the Lloyd Collection will be presented by London-based dealers Oliver Forge & Brendan Lynch Ltd. at 9 East 82nd Street, Suite 1A. The exhibition comprises a remarkable group of 25 Mughal, Rajput and Deccani miniature paintings mainly assembled in the 1970s and ’80s by a private English collector. A number of the most important paintings were acquired at two milestone London exhibitions, at Colnaghi in 1978 and 1979, and others at auction.

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An assembly of royal pigeons round a dovecote. Mughal India, circa 1660. Opaque watercolour with gold on paper. Courtesy Oliver Forge & Brendan Lynch Ltd

Kapoor Galleries will present ‘A Sterling Collection’ of Indian & Himalayan Art at its 1015 Madison Avenue space. The collection, amassed by a private American collector over a 20-year period, contains exquisite examples of Indian miniature painting as well as sculptural masterpieces from India, Nepal & Tibet. The collection consists of 29 Indian paintings and 15 sculptures that were acquired almost exclusively from auctions in New York. 011

Vajradara. Yuan dynasty. Gilt copper with semiprecious stones. Courtesy Kapoor Galleries

Arnold H. Lieberman of 311 East 72nd Street, Suite 6F, will exhibit Recent Acquisitions, an exhibition featuring a large, polychromed wood sculpture of a Chinese Buddhist Abbott, circa 1770; a rare Ninxia skeleton carpet; an elaborate Rajastani shield of painted dahl hide and other distinctive objects primarily from South Asia and the Himalayan regions. 34_A_girl_with_an_Indian_headdress_1_

Lanta. Eastern Tibet or China, 17th or 18th century. Wood with polychrome. Courtesy Arnold H. Lieberman

Exhibition of Jewels from Mughal India and South East Asia will be presented by Sue Ollemans Oriental Art from London, exhibiting this year at Valentina Gallery Inc., 960 Madison Avenue, 2nd Floor, and will feature jewels dating from the 17th 19th centuries and related objects. Along with these will be a collection of jewels from the Deccan and Tamil Nadu in the South of India dating from 12th-20th centuries. Jewels from South East Asia—most importantly Java (dating from 11th-16th centuries07

A gold and ruby Nandi, South Deccan, 17th century or earlier. Courtesy Sue Ollemans Oriental Art

Carlton Rochell Asian Art will offer Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art at its 44 East 74th Street gallery. Featured will be more than 20 sculptures and paintings from India, Tibet, Nepal and Cambodia. These works hail from prestigious private collections in both America and Europe; works range in date from the 2nd century A.D. to the 18th century. 010

Sarasvati. South India. Hoysala dynasty, mid 12th century. Grey chloritic schist. Courtesy Carlton Rochell Asian Art

John Siudmak Asian Art of London will present Indian and Himalayan Sculptures and Thankas from the Collection of the Late Simon Digby at C.G. Boerner Gallery, 23 East 73rd Street. The exhibition of 30 items comes from the leading historian of ancient India, Simon Digby (1932-2010). Highlights will include the bronze and stone sculpture of the Western Himalayas, including Kashmir and Swat, but other parts of north India, particularly the Pala sculpture of Bihar and Bengal, will also be well represented. Many of the sculptures have been published, of which three were exhibited in the recent Asia Society exhibition, The Arts of Kashmir.

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Censer. Courtesy John Siudmak Asian Art of London

Recent Acquisitions of Master Works of Indian and Southeast Asian Art will be presented by Doris Wiener, LLC at 1001 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3C. Among the objects on display will be an important and early Eastern Indian Vishnu stele, an elegant South Indian bronze Jina, Khmer and pre-Khmer sculptures, a selection of Himalayan gilt bronzes and thangkas and a collection of fine Indian miniature paintings.

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Vishnu. India, Bihar, Pre Pala, 6th-7th century. Grey stone. Courtesy Doris Wiener, LLC

Nancy Wiener, exhibiting this year at Trezza Gallery, 39 East 78th Street, Suite 603, will show Indian and Southeast Asian Sculpture, Jewelry, and Works on Paper from 300 BC to the Present. Highlights will include a superb 11th-century Pala Avalokiteshvara; a splendid Khmer necklace, carved from gold in the shape of intertwined jasmine blossoms; as well as a select group of Indian miniature paintings.

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Kumara, India, Rajasthan, 13th century. Black stone. Courtesy Trezza Gallery

Art of the Past will also be exhibiting during Asia Week New York 2011; exhibitions details will be forthcoming.

Korean and Japanese Works of Art and Contemporary Korean and Japanese Rounding out this year’s extraordinary assemblage of exhibitions will include six shows of Korean and Japanese paintings, ceramics, lacquer, netsuke and more spanning from the late 17th century to today.

200 Years of Korean Art: From Classic to Contemporary will be offered at Kang Collection Korean Art, 9 East 82nd Street, Suite 3A, and will feature artworks from classical, 19th-century paintings through today showcasing ink paintings and screens. The show’s focus is on paintings from the tumultuous period of the late 19th/early 20th century in Korea and China that developed out of turbulent politics and yet diligent cultural exchange between Korea and East Asia. The contemporary art will feature, among others, two cutting-edge Korean women painters rooted in the classic traditions of Korean art. 07

KimGyu-Jin, Chrysanthemum and Rocks, late 19th centiry, Joseon dynasty, ink. Courtesy Kang Collection Korean Art

KooNewYork will present its 10th Anniversary Exhibition of Korean Art at Mark Murray Gallery, 39 East 72nd Street, 5th Floor. The exhibition will showcase a wide range of high-quality, Korean antiques from solid provenanced collections and as well as contemporary ceramics and photography. Among the highlights to be shown is a recently discovered, unique, Large Buddhist Pantheon Drawing from the early 18th century with no known comparable examples in the West.

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Chong Son (Kyumjai, 1676-1759), Chungyangsa Temple Amid Diamond Mountains. Courtesy KooNewYork

Birds of Dawn: Pioneers of Japan’s Sôdeisha Ceramic Movement will be on view at Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd., 39 East 78th Street, 4th Floor. An exhibition over 10 years in the making, this show features the Movement’s three founders (Suzuki Osamu, Yagi Kazuo and Yamada Hikaru), who began their careers with original functional work but soon moved to avant-garde sculptural forms that remain as influential today as they were 60 years ago. 07

Suzuki Osamu (1926-2991), Hanayagu tori; Flamboyant bird, 1991. Stoneware with red slip and ashes glazes. Courtesy Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd

Sydney L. Moss Ltd of London will offer an exhibition, Centenary Exhibitions of Japanese Art, including the Elly Nordskog Collection of Inro, devoted to Japanese art at the Alexandre Gallery, 41 East 57th Street, 13th Floor. This will be Moss’ sixth annual New York exhibition and will feature lacquer, inrō, pipecases, netsuke and other works from the collection of the Californian nonagenarian and grande dame of the heyday of Japanese art collecting in Los Angeles, as well as works from the Edo period. 0_

A remarkable Japanese wood sculpture of Oni Nembutsu, Edo period, 18th century. Courtesy Sydney L. Moss Ltd

Scholten Japanese Art, located at 145 East 58th Street, Suite 6D, will present Monogatari: Tales of Japan, an exhibition of paintings, woodblock prints and a selection of netsuke devoted to the art of story-telling. 07

Mano Gyotei (1874-1934), Raijin, ink and color on silk (detail). Courtesy Scholten Japanese Art

Ink, Wood, and Clay: New Selections of Early to Contemporary Japanese Masterworks will be shown by Kyoto-based Hiroshi Yanagi Oriental Art at Arader Galleries, 1016 Madison Avenue, 2nd Floor. Mr. Yanagi has spent the past year assembling more than 40 fresh and interesting pieces especially for this exhibition, particularly of animal subjects and ceramics from Kyoto. Selected Works by Art Students organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art.

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Jizo Bosatsu. Japan, Kamaura period, late 13th century. Hinoki wood. Courtesy Hiroshi Yanagi Oriental Art

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A parcel-gilt silver repousse figure of Padmasambhava in the aspect of Nyima Oser Tibet, 18th century. Pre-sale estimate $60,000-80,000. Photo: Bonhams

NEW YORK, N.Y.- Bonhams is thrilled to participate in New York City’s Asia Week 2011, which brings together a variety of art outlets to celebrate Asian art from China, India, Japan, Korea, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia. Bonhams will highlight this week with two sales on September 13, 2011—The Sartin Collection of Asian Art and Fine Japanese Works of Art.

The Sartin Collection of Asian Art
The Sartin Collection of Asian Art auction comes from the impressive collection of Peter Sartin, a major supporter of the Pacific Asia Museum and one who had an eye for the unusual and rare. Predominantly consisting of Tibetan, Nepalese and Indian art and artifacts, several objects in the sale were included in the Pacific Asia Museum’s landmark exhibition titled “Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life” (2004-2005).

Edward Wilkinson, Bonhams Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art Consultant, states, “This is the most important collection of Tibetan furniture to appear at auction, and combined with the extremely important group of silver works, it presents a wonderful opportunity for connoisseurs and new collectors alike.”

Among this exhibited collection there are several highlights to this sale. Of particular note is a 15th-16th century luminous red painted trunk with two striking “stupas” on the front. In remarkably good condition, this trunk represents the highest standards of Tibetan furniture making, with a pre-sale estimate of $15,000-20,000.

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A storage chest. Tibet, 16th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams

Ground mineral pigments, cloth wood and metal; the tray top with partial remaining decoration of a floral cartouche above a front panel decorated with a deer supported by a large lotus and surrounding leaves within a cusped cartouche. The surrounding flower head trellis pattern is enclosed by gold scrolling form spandrels and similar border. The sides are painted with jeweled offerings. 30 ½ x 11 x 16 ½ in. (77.5 x 27.9 x 41.9 cm.). Estimate: US$10,000 – 15,000
 
Note: As noted in the exhibition catalogue (p. 234) “.. the central cartouche is painted with a mythical animal with a backswept horn resembling Yuan (1279-1368), or earlier, forms of Chinese qilin – or unicorn.Provenance: Acquired from Tony Anninos, San Francisco 2004Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 58, p. 234.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005, no. 58.
 
Greatly important and extremely rare are three 15th-16th century altar tables (estimated at $8,000-12,000, $5,000-8,000 and $4,000-6,000, respectively). These tables each consist of prolific carved aprons and cabriole legs. The detailing exudes the distinctive Tibetan style of power and grace.
 
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An altar table. Tibet, circa 15th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Ground mineral pigments and wood; the plain rectangular top above a foliate carved inset panel frieze and similar deep apron, centered by a precious jewel, raised on elaborate cabriole legs with scrolling floral terminals. 24 ¼ x 10 ½ x 15 in. (61.6 x 26.7 x 38.1 cm.). Estimate: US$8,000 – 12,000
 
Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 9, p. 185.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005.
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An altar table. Tibet, 15th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Wood with traces of pigments; the rectangular top above a heavily carved frieze with five large flower heads raised on short cabriole legs.
21 ½ x 11 x 15 in. (54 x 27.9 x 38.1 cm.). Estimate: US$5,000 – 8,000
 
Provenance: Acquired from Lucca Corona, Kathmandu, Nepal, 2004
 
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An altar table. Tibet, 16th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Wood with traces of pigments; the rectangular inset tray top painted red above a deep frieze with three inset floral cartouches supported by a front panel of carved heavy floral and scrolling forms. 30 x 15 x 20 in. (76.2 x 38.1 x 50.8 cm.). Estimate: US$4,000 – 6,000
Provenance: Acquired from Ian Alsop, Santa Fe, 2004.Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 23, p. 200.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005.
 
In addition to furniture, is a highly important collection of Tibetan ritual silver objects, some of which are the finest known examples in private hands. One particular highlight, among several, is an 18th century parcel-gilt silver repoussé of figure of Padmasambhava. The Padmasambhava sculpture is a portrait of the historical figure who was responsible for establishing Vajrayana Buddhism in Tibet in the 8th century. He is depicted in the form of Nyima Oser, one of his eight manifestations (est. $60,000-80,000).
 
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A parcel-gilt silver repoussé figure of Padmasambhava in the aspect of Nyima Oser. Tibet, 18th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Inset stones and based seal with original contents; In the appearance of a mahasiddha he gazes directly ahead with a benevolent expression. Adorned with a skull crown around a high topknot, he wears an incised sash across his right shoulder that partially covers a large pectoral secured by four double-beaded bands tied by dorjes . He wears a tiger skin dhoti and is seated on a lotus platform with scalloped leaves. A katvanga staff rests on right left shoulder and the left hand rests in his lap. The right hand is placed across the knee performs a mudra with the index finger extended and would have likely held a lasso. 30 ¾ in. (78 cm.). Estimate: US$60,000 – 80,000
 
Provenance: Sotheby’s, London, June 13 and 14, 1988, lot 106
Collection of Kate Kemper
Christie’s, New York, September 23, 2004, lot 156The identity of this sculpture has been subject to variations over the past twenty years. However, with the presence of the katvanga staff, skull crown and arrangement of the hands this would appear to be certainly a manifestation of Padmasambhava in the form of Nyima Oser.The contents that were used to concecrate the sculture when it was made were revealed when the sculpture was sold by Sotheby’s, London in 1988. Directly after the sale the sculpture was resealed with the contents and it has remained intact since then. The contents are recorded to include a silver prayer wheel, an iron purba, a silver gau box, multiple inscribed and illustrated prayer scrolls, tsa-tsa, mala beads and counters, various cloth fragments and pouches, teeth of venerated lamas, and lengths of human hair identified to owners 
 
In terms of refinement, the silver ritual vase offered in this sale is an ideal representation of great attention to detail with its staggering complex display of skeletal figures, skull bowls and animals associated with the charnel grounds. Because of its rarity, it was most likely kept in a private chapel and only used for specials ceremonies (est. $50,000-80,000).
 
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A ritual offering vase with Smashana Adipati. Tibeto-Chinese, circa 18th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Raised on a tapered lotus foot, the body of the vase is decorated with scenes of the cremation or charnel grounds between a sea of flames and beaded garlands. Ornamented with various ritual implements including; a flaming sword, ritual axe, and conch as well as birds of prey, and mythical beasts. Scattered in the composition are a variant of the seven gems of the chakravartin including; a coral branch, a pair of elephant tusks, a three-eyed jewel, a unicorn horn, the three gems, crossed pair of measuring rulers, a pair of king’s earrings and a pair of queen’s earrings. The primary elements of the dancing skeletons (chitipat), showing the male holding a skull-tipped scepter and a skull bowl, while the female holds a stalk of grain and a vase. These figures are divided by flaming skull cups, one filled with the five sense offerings, the other filled with nectar and a dragon head at the rim. The projecting ruffled rim and row of skulls support four nagas with raised heads that encircle two bands of water and mountain motifs below a band of kirttimukha, and another with an ocean containing makaras, a man rowing a boat filled with jewels and Chinese style pavilion. The flared rim is supported by a waisted lotus and cloud forms around the broad mouth. 14 in. (35.7 cm.) . Estimate: US$50,000 – 80,000
 
Note: In discussion of Smashana Adipati, lords of the charnel grounds by Linrothe and Watt, Demonic and Devine: Himalayan Art and Beyond, New York, 2004, p. 128 “Smashana Adipati is one of the Sanskrit names for a dancing-skeleton couple who inhabit and preside over the (thus adipati, “lords”) cremations grounds (smashana), where Indian Tantric yoginswere encouraged to practice.”The actual function of this decorated vase is unclear beyond an offering, however the idea of the imagery being associated with their benevolent aspect of protecting wealth is also suggested. Furthermore in their discussion of the connection of Chitipati to the Sakya lineage (ibid, p. 126)”..both figures (Chitipati) consistently hold identical objects in their left and right hands: a skull-or skeleton-tipped scepter and a skull bowl containing swirling blood, respectively. By contrast, the Gelugpa images….usually give the female a stalk of grain and a vase signifying the bestowal of wealth.”The quality of the detailed decoration and powerful imagery place this vase at the peak of metalwork production in Tibet during the 18th century. However, the Qing Emperors were known to be strict followers of the Gelugpa order of Tibetan Buddhism and they constructed many temples in Chende, the summer retreat for the Qing court, and commissioned many sculptures and ritual items for ceremonies. The embossed silver inset panels on a ritual conch in Rehol, Chenge (see Chen Qingying, Buddhist Art from Rehol, 1999, no. 65, p. 153) are very closely related in the treatment of the animal figures and auspicious symbols. Also compare with a silver and gilt copper mandala of Vasudhara in the Art Institute of Chicago, (see Pal, Tibet: Tradition and Change, Albuquerque, 1997, pl. 77, p. 154). Furthermore, the presence of a Chinese style pagoda in a prominent position on the upper band of the neck, and the treatment of the animal forms are closely aligned with Chinese norms. These stylistic element together with the Gelupa style of imagery, make it possible that this vase was commissioned by a patron connected to imperial workshops.Provenance: Spink & Son, Ltd., London, 1998
Private European Collection
Christie’s, New York, March 25, 2004, lot 82Exhibited: London, Spink & Son, Ltd., Body, Speech, and Mind, cat. no. 40, December 1998.
Madrid, Fundación “La Caixa”, Monasterios y lamas del Tibet, cat. no. 34, November 2000-January 2001.Published: Exhibition catalogue, Body, Speech and Mind, London, Spink & Son, Ltd., 1998, p. 76 cat. no. 40.
Ramon Prats, et. al., Monasterios y lamas del Tibet, Madrid, Fundación “La Caixa”, 2000, p. 109, cat. no. 34.
 
Beyond the highlighted collection of furniture and ritual silver objects, there are numerous other rarities to be discovered within this collection. The auction will take place Mar. 13, 2011 at 10 a.m., EST at Bonhams’ New York headquarters.Fine Japanese Works of Art
Following The Sartin Collection of Asian Art auction in the morning is the afternoon sale of Fine Japanese Works of Art. This season’s sale boasts lots that will appeal to a variety of markets and collectors.Jeff Olson, Bonhams Director of Japanese Art, states, “Bonhams Japanese department is pleased to offer a wide variety of objects, paintings and prints in conjunction with the week of Asian art sales held in New York this September. We feel confident that there will something of interest to collectors in all categories of Japanese art.” This auction contains several important armor lots; one in particular being the highly important Haruta-school tosei gusoku armor (est. $60,000-70,000). This high-quality armor, with completely matched elements – even the original green and orange lacing, is historically attributed to Okudaira Nobumasa. Nobumasa is considered a fulcrum in Japanese history because of his role in a key battle that changed the course of Japanese history. Inside the storage box, in which the armor is contained, is an inscription written by San Ko Shoeki, the founder of the Kyushoin temple in Kyoto where the armor is thought to be located. In the closing of his inscription, he states, “When I look at this armor I feel as if Lord Okudaira’s spirit is here with me, and I remember him and feel like he is here before me. This is surely a very important treasure of this temple.”
 
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A highly important Haruta-school tosei gusoku. Late 16th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
The armor of completely matched elements with original green and orange lacing intact and comprising: a thirty-two plate akoda nari kabuto lacquered black and mounted with silvered-copper fukurin and igaki pierced at the base with inoshishime, the top of the bowl adorned with a four-stage chrysanthemum-form tehen kanamono carved with vines, the five-lame Hineno-style shikoro ending in small fukigaeshi, the mabizashi finished with a “rope” edge, a gilt-bronze tsuki to hoshi maedate; the iron reisei men lacquered black and applied with a boar’s bristle mustache and chin tuft, the lips lacquered red and the teeth silvered, fitted with a four-lame yodarekake; the cuirass a ni-mai maru do of iron scales laced in kebiki and fitted with seven sections of four-lame kusazuri, the front of the cuirass applied with a small gilt-copper gumbai and hexagonal medallions containing plum florets, the heraldic crests of the Okudaira clan; tosei sode; oda gote; shino suneate; kawara haidate; one wood storage box; no armor stand. Estimate: US$60,000 – 70,000
奥平信昌 当世具足 16世紀後期Provenance: Okudaira Nobumasa (1555–1615)
Kyushoin Temple, Kyoto, the Okudaira family templePublished: Nakamura Tatsuo, Ken to yoroi to rekishi(Kyoto: Kennin Shoku, 1999)Nakamura Tatsuo, Nakamura Koutoushushikan: Kitaku zoushin zuroku(Kyoto: Kennin Shoku, 1999)Note: This armor is historically attributed to Okudaira Nobumasa. The historical attribution is supported by an inscription (hako gaki) on the inside of the box written by San Ko Shoeki, the founder of the Kyushoin temple in Kyoto where the armor is thought to have been located until modern times. Kyushoin has a long association with the Okudaira clan. The inscription in the box is believed to be authentic as it is written in old Japanese script (kanbun) and uses nuances and phrases relevant to the era in question.The armor is typical of a high-quality armor produced by the Haruta group during the Warring States period (sengoku jidai)in Japan (1467-1610) during the lifespan of Okudaira Nobumasa. The helmet shows alterations on the inside that are typical of alterations done to armors that were made during the second half of the 1500s and updated before the battle of Sekigahara. The fukurin or metal piping on the helmet is plated with silver rather than with gold, which was much more typical. The fabric of the leg protectors is black velvet, which is known to have been imported by Portuguese traders and employed for use in very high-quality armors made by the Haruta group during the late-16th and early-17th centuries. The front of cuirass is decorated with small badges (kanamon), a decorative motif that became popular among Samurai who had served in the Korean campaigns under Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537-1598) in the early 1590s. After the Battle of Sekigahara (21st day of the 9th month of 1600), the custom fell out of fashion and virtually all of these kanamonowere removed. It is rare to find an armor with these articles still intact. In its current state, this armor appears as it did in 1600 when it was last worn into the Battle of Sekigahara (21st day of the 9th month of 1600).Okudaira Nobumasa (born Sadamasa) is considered a fulcrum in Japanese history since his role at a key battle changed the course of Japanese history. His birth name was Sadamasa and he was originally a retainer of the Tokugawa clan but was forced into service with Takeda Shingen (1521–1573). Upon Takeda Shingen’s death, Sadamasa left the service of the Takeda clan and rejoined Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616). His action enraged Shingen’s son, Takeda Katsuyori (1546–1582), who had Okudaira’s wife, children and brother crucified for the action. Then, in 1575, Katsuyori besieged Okudaira at Nagashino Castle, which guarded the gateway to Mikawa, Ieyasu’s hometown. Okudaira, with a force of 500, made a stubborn defense against the Takeda force of 15,000. Fueled by the fire of retribution for the execution of his family, Okudaira was able to hold out long enough for the Oda and Tokugawa forces to rally. Because the siege wore the Takeda forces down and allowed the allies to organize and set up their defenses, the Takeda lost the battle. This was a major turning point which ultimately lead to the end of the Warring States period. Without the efforts and loyalty of Okudaira, the Warring States period may have continued much longer.

For his service at the siege of Nagashino Castle, Okudaira was given permission from Oda Nobunaga (1534–1582) to use the first character of his name “Nobu” and change his name from Sadamasa to Nobumasa. Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded him Nagashino Castle and married his eldest daughter, Kamehime, to him. He was later awarded the territory of Miyasaki, which had an income of 30,000 koku. For his service at the Battle of Sekigahara on the side of the Tokugawa, Okudaira was appointed the first Kyoto Shoshidai or special attaché of the Shogun to the Emperor under the Tokugawa government. Later he was rewarded with the Kano domain in Mino province, which was a 100,000 koku income territory. He died in 1615 at the age of 59.

 
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Inside the box is a separate piece of paper that reads “Written by Master Sanko.” This was likely written by a monk of the temple who was a follower of Sanko Shoeki, the founder of the temple.The inscription on the inside of the box may be translated as follows:Explanation of this armor in the Kyushoin temple (of the Kenninji Temple complex) owned by Okudaira Nobumasa.This armor previously belonged to Lord Okudaira descendant of Taira Nobumasa of Sakushu, and trusted and loyal retainer to the Shogun (Tokugawa Ieyasu). I was his close friend.He played the most important role and rendered distinctive service at Nagashino when he showed great bravery in the face of the enemy and did not retreat even when outnumbered 1000 to 1 and was bestowed rewards for his actions.He was not just a strong warrior but an accomplished intellectual and educated gentlemen who was multi-talented and was accomplished in the ways of poetry, manner, calligraphy, tea ceremony, etc.Not only did he accomplish many great things, but he was proper and respectful and made sacrifices for the good of the country, and was a great man.

When I look at this armor I feel as if Lord Okudaira’s spirit is here with me and I remember him and feel like he is here before me.

This is surely a very important treasure of this temple.

June 14th in the 16th year of the Kanei Era (1637)
23 years after the death of Lord Nobumasa

I (the old) Sanko Shoeki reflect on my memories and write this account.

Signed with kao.

 
Also in the sale is a breadth of work by 20th century Japanese painter, woodblock print maker and world traveler Yoshida Hiroshi. Bonhams is privileged to continue these offerings from the Collection of Yoshida Chizuko, his daughter-in-law, after two successful sales in 2006 and 2008. Highlights from the 67 lots offered during this sale include several non-Japanese subjects done in traditional Japanese woodblock style. During his 1924 tour of North America, he was inspired greatly by several landscapes, including an oil on canvas titled Niagara Falls (1924) (est. $4,000-6,000) ; Lake Louise (1924) (est. $4,000-6,000); Grand Canyon (1924) (est. $8,000-12,000); and Southwest Landscape (1924) (est.$4,000-6,000). Several subjects he revisited a year later, to complete woodblock prints, such as the 1925 woodcut entitled Yosemitto-koku erukyapitan (El Capitan in Yosemite Valley) (est. $8,000-12,000). To name a few of the other series of his work covered in this sale are “Europe,” “Ten Views of Fuji” and “India and Southwest Asia.”
 
Another highlight is a hanging scroll titled “Beauty and Emma-O” by Kawanabe Kyosai, who is known for his lively compositions and virtuoso draftsmanship. As represented in this painting and several of his other works, is the King of Hell ready to hand out punishment to sinners. In this particular work, the King of Hell holds up a mirror where he sees the reflection of a disheveled courtesan waiting for punishment (est. $6,000-8,000).
 
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Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-1889). Beauty and Emma-O. Photo: Bonhams
 
Hanging scroll, ink and colors on silk; a King of Hell holds up a mirror, looking gleefully down at the courtesan and attendant reflected on it; signed Seisei Kyosai ga and sealed Ichiji sen shi. With wood box inscribed Kyosai sensei jigoku dayu no zu and with lot tag 48. 48 1/2 x 19 1/2in (123.2 x 49.5cm). Estimate: US$6,000 – 8,000
 
Provenance: Baron Honda, sold Kanazawa Bijutsu Club, 1936Published: Tokyo Honda Danshaku ke Hayashi ke/Zohin nyusatsu mokuroku (Baron Honda Family and Hayashi Family/catalogue of collection), Showa 11 (1937), Kanazawa Bijutsu Kurabu.Note: Kyosai is known for his lively compositions and virtuoso draftsmanship. His life straddled both the Edo and Meiji periods and was also popular as a caricaturist despite his multiple arrests by the shogunate and the new government. He made several paintings based on similar subject matter – the King of Hell ready to hand out punishments to sinners. The large figure in the background is the King of Hell, symbolized by the character “O” (king) in his crown. The sinner awaiting punishment is shown reflected in his mirror, revealing the wrong-doings that led the deceased to his realm. In this painting expression on the face of the woman is somber, and her hair disheveled, yet she is dressed in beautifully decorated robes. The obi tied in the front indicates she had been a courtesan in her lifetime. Perhaps the apsaraor heavenly deity shown on her obi is a symbol of repentance as she is about to face her fate.The title on the box and the catalogue entry for the Bijutsu Club sale identifies this painting as Jigoku daiyu (Hell Courtesan), a subject for which Kyosai was well known.
 

Major International Loan Exhibition Featuring Greatest Artists in History of Indian Painting Goes on View at Metropolitan Museum

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Payag (Painter), Mir ‘Ali (Calligrapher). Shah Jahan riding a stallion: page from the Kevorkian Album. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1628. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 11 1/8 x 8 3/16 in. (28.2 x 20.8 cm). Page: 15 5/16 x 10 1/8 in. (38.9 x 25.7 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.21b)

Indian paintings have traditionally been classified according to regional styles or dynastic periods, with an emphasis on subject matter and narrative content. Recent scholarship, however, has begun to securely link innovations in style with specific artists and their lineages. Together with a careful study of artist’s inscriptions and scribal colophons, it is now possible to construct a more precise chronology of the development of Indian painting.

Beginning September 28, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present “Wonder of the Age”: Master Painters of India, 1100-1900, a major loan exhibition devoted to the connoisseurship of Indian painting, with some 200 works selected according to identifiable hands and named artists. The exhibition dispels the notion of anonymity in Indian art. The high points of artistic innovation in the history of Indian painting will be demonstrated through works by more than 40 of the greatest Indian painters, some of whom are identified for the first time. Each artist will be represented in the exhibition by five to six seminal works.

The exhibition is made possible by MetLife Foundation. Additional support is provided by Novartis Corporation.

It was organized by the Museum Rietberg Zurich in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Structured chronologically, the exhibition will feature the artistic achievement of individual artists in each period. Highlights include: A Sufi Sage by Farrukh Beg, after a European engraving of the personification of melancholia, Dolor, an extraordinary painting representing the last chapter of the artist’s long career (1615, Museum of Islamic Art, Doha); Peafowl attributed to Mansur, a master of observation of the natural world (ca. 1610, private collection); Jahangir receives Prince Khurram at Ajmer on his return from the Mewar campaign: page from the Windsor Padshahnama by Balchand, a master of composition (ca. 1635, Royal Collection, Royal Library, Windsor); Shiva and Parvati playing chaupad by Pahari, a superb painting with intense saturated color, bold but sparse composition, and stylized landscape, depicting the divine couple relaxing on a tiger skin playing chaupad, a form of chess (1694-95, Metropolitan Museum); and Emperor Muhammad Shah with falcon viewing his garden at sunset from a palanquinattributed to Chitarman II, depicting the emperor enjoying his garden at sunset (ca. 1730, Boston Museum of Fine Arts).

The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue.

Major collections in India, Europe, and the United States have lent works to the exhibition, including: HM The Queen’s Collection Windsor Castle, National Museum of India and the Udaipur City Palace Museum in Rajasthan, the Aga Khan Trust Geneva, the Bodleian Library and the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, and the Museum Rietberg in Zurich.

“Wonder of the Age”: Master Painters of India, 1100 – 1900has been produced under the direction of three eminent scholars—Dr. Eberhard Fischer, former director of the Museum Rietberg; Prof. Milo Beach, former director of the Freer & Sackler Galleries in Washington, D.C.; and Prof. B. N. Goswamy, Professor Emeritus of Art History at the Panjab University, Chandigarh. Dr. Jorrit Britschgi of the Museum Rietberg is the organizing curator in collaboration with John Guy, the Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of the Arts of South and Southeast Asia at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition was on view at the Museum Rietberg Zurich before traveling to New York.

A variety of education programs will accompany the exhibition, including gallery talks, films, and a Sunday at the Metprogram on October 2.

This exhibition in New York is organized by John Guy, Curator in the Department of the Asian Art. The exhibition design is by Daniel Kershaw, Exhibition Design Manager; graphics are by Sue Koch, Graphic Design Manager; and lighting is by Clint Ross Coller and Richard Lichte, Lighting Design Managers, all of the Metropolitan Museum’s Design Department.

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Purkhu (Attributed). Maharaja Sansar Chand of Kangra admiring pictures with his courtiers. Pahari region of Himnachal Pradesh, ca. 1800 – 1815; Opaque watercolor on paper; Painting: 9 1/16 x 7 1/16 in. (23 x 18 cm); Page: 11 7/16 x 8 11/16 in. (29 x 22 cm). Museum Reitberg Zürich, Bequest of Balthasar Reinhart (2005.9)

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Master of the Jainesque Shahnama. Unknown workshop, possibly Malwa Siyavash faces Afrasiyab across the Jihun River: page from a Shahnama manuscript. India, ca. 1425–50. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper; Painting: 7 7/8 x 4 13/16 in. (20 x 12 cm). Page: 12 11/16 x 9 1/4 in. (32 x 23.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Balthasar and Nanni Reinhart (RVI 964, f. 108v.) 

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Basawan, Shravana and Tara (Attributed). Asad ibn Kariba launches a night attack on the camp of Malik Iraj: folio from a Hamzanama series. Delhi-Fatephur Sikri, ca. 1570. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on cotton cloth, mounted on paper, 27 x 21 1/4 in. (68.6 x 54 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Rogers Fund, 1918 (18.44.1)

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Basawan. The Sufi Abu’l Abbas rebukes the vain dervish: page from a Baharistan of Jami manuscript. Mughal court atLahore, dated 1595. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 7 11/16 x 4 15/16 in. (19.5 x 12.6 cm). Page: 11 13/16 x 7 11/16 in. (30 x 19.5 cm). The Bodleian Library, University ofOxford(Ms. Elliot 254, f. 9a)

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Basawan (Attributed). Woman worshipping the sun: page from a Jahangirnama manuscript. Mughal court atLahoreorDelhi, ca. 1590–95. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 9 1/16 x 4 1/2 in. (23 x 11.5 cm). Page: 16 3/4 x 10 1/2 in. (42 x 26.7 cm). Museum of Islamic Art,Doha(Ms. 157)

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‘Abd-al-Samad. Two fighting camels. Mughal court at Fatehpur Sikri orLahore, ca. 1590. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper, 7 3/8 x 8 1/16 in. (18.8 x 20.5 cm). Private Collection

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Manohar (Attributed), Akbar hunting in a qamargha, or the humiliation of Hamid Bhakari: page from an Akbarnama manuscript. Mughal court probably atLahore, dated by association 1597. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 8 7/16 x 5 in. (21.4 x 12.7 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Theodore M. Davis Collection. Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915 (30.95.174.8)

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Manohar or Basawan (Attributed), Mother and child with a white cat: folio from the Jahangir al’ Album. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1598. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 8 9/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21.7 x 13.7 cm). Page: 14 9/16 x 9 5/8 in. (37 x 24.4 cm). The San DiegoMuseumof Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection (1990.293)

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Farrukh Beg, Emperor Babur returning late to camp, drunk after a boating party in celebration of the end of Ramadan (‘id) in 1519: page from a Baburnama manuscript. Mughal court at Lahore, dated 1589. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 9 5/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21 x 13 cm). Page: 16 1/8 x 10 5/8 in. (40.9 x 27 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Purchase – Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program, and Arthur M. Sackler (S1986.231)

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Farrukh Beg, A Sufi sage, after the European personification of melancholia, Dolor. Mughal court atAgra, dated 1615. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 7 5/8 x 5 9/16 in. (19.4 x 14.1 cm). Page: 15 1/16 x 10 1/16 in. (38.2 x 25.6 cm). Museum of Islamic Art,Doha

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Farrukh Beg, Self-portrait of Farrukh Beg: page from a muraqqa of Shah Jahan. Mughal court at Agra, ca. 1615. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 5 13/16 x 2 7/8 in. (14.7 x 7.3 cm). Page: 21 15/16 x 13 11/16 in. (55.7 x 34.8 cm). Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection

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Keshav Das, Akbar with falcon receiving Itimam Khan, while below a poor petitioner (self-portrait of the painter Keshav Das as an old man) is driven away by a royal guard: page from the Jahangir Album. Mughal court atLahore, dated 1589. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 8 1/2 x 5 7/8 in. (26.7 cm x 15 cm). Page: 21 1/8 x 15 1/2 in. (53.7 cm x 39.5 cm). Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz (Ms. 117, fol. 25 a)

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Keshav Das, Saint Jerome. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1580 – 85. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 11/16 x 3 15/16 in. (17 x 10 cm). Page: 12 5/8 x 8 1/16 in. (32.1 x 20.5 cm). Musée des Arts Asiatiques—Guimet, Paris (MA 2476)

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Aqa Riza (Painter), Mir ‘Ali (Calligrapher), Fath Muhammad (Marginalia), A youth fallen from a tree: page from the Kevorkian Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1610. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 8 9/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21.7 x 13.7 cm). Page: 14 9/16 x 9 5/8 in. (37 x 24.4 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.20v)

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Abu’l Hasan, Study of Saint John the Evangelist, adapted from Dürer’s Crucifixion engraving of 1511. Mughal court, probably atAllahabad, dated 1600 – 1601. Brush drawn ink on paper, 3 15/16 x 1 13/16 in. (10 x 4.6 cm). TheAshmoleanMuseum,Oxford. Gift of Gerald Reitlinger, 1978 (EA 1978.2597)

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Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471–1528, Crucifixion, from The Small Engraved Passion. German, dated 1511. Engraving. Page: 4 9/16 x 2 15/16 in. (11.6 x 7.4 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Fletcher Fund, 1919 (19.73.13)

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Abu’l Hasan, Celebrations at the accession of Jahangir: page from a Jahangirnama manuscript; St. Petersburg Album. Mughal court atAjmerorAgra, ca. 1615–18. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Image: 14 7/8 x 8 11/16 in. (37.8 x 22 cm). Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Oriental Studies,St. Petersburg(Ms. E-14, fol. 10)

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‘Abid, The death of Khan Jahan Lodi: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atAgra, 1633. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 12 1/2 x 7 7/8 in. (31.8 x 20 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,WindsorCastle(Ms. 1367, fol. 94b)

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Mansur (Attributed), Great hornbill: page from the Kevorkian Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court atAjmer, ca. 1615. Opaque watercolor, gold and ink on paper. Page: 15 5/16 x 10 in. (38.9 x 25.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.14v)

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Mansur, Chameleon. Mughal court at LahoreorAllahabad, ca. 1595–1600. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 4 5/16 x 5 3/8 in. (11 x 13.7 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,WindsorCastle(RL 12081)

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Balchand, Jahangir receives Prince Khurram atAjmeron his return from the Mewar campaign: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atLahoreor Daulatabad, ca. 1635. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 11 15/16 x 7 15/16 in. (30.4 x 20.1 cm). Page: 22 15/16 x 14 7/16 in. (58.2 x 36.7 cm). Mounted: 32 x 24 in. (81.3 x 61 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library, Windsor (RCIN 1005025, fol. 43b)

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Balchand, A youth expires when his beloved approaches and speaks to him: incomplete page from a Gulistan of Sa’di manuscript. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1610–15 (additions c. 1640, perhaps by Murad). Opaque watercolor on paper, mounted and lacquered. Painting: 7 3/8 x 5 in. The David Collection, Copenhagen (1/2009)

41

Payag, Nasiri Khan directing the siege of the fort of Qandahar, May 1631: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1633. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 12 5/8 x 9 in. (32.1 x 22.9 cm). Page: 22 15/16 x 14 7/16 in. (58.2 x 36.7 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,Windsor Castle (RCIN 1005025)

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Payag (Attributed). Prince Dara Shikoh hunting nilgais. Mughal court, probably at Lahore, ca. 1635. Opaque watercolor on paper. 6 3/16 x 8 11/16 in. (15.8 x 22.1 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Purchase, Washington, D.C. (S1993.42a)

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Payag. Humayan seated in a landscape, admiring a turban ornament: page from the Late Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1650. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 7 3/8 x 4 3/4 in. (18.7 x 12.1 cm).. Page: 17 1/2 x 13 in (44.5 x 33 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian. Institution, Purchase—Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program, and Dr. Arthur M. Sackler, Washington, D.C. (S86.0400)

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Masters of the Chunar, Ragamala (Shaykh Husayn, Shaykh Ali, Shaykh Hatim), Malkausik Raga: page from the Chunar Ragamala. Chunar, Uttar Pradesh, dated 1591. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. 10 3/8 x 6 5/16 in. (26.3 x 16 cm). Private Collection, New York

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Nasiruddin, Varati Ragini: folio from the Chawand Ragamala series. Chawand, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1605. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Page: 8 1/16 x 7 1/2 in. (20.5 x 19 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Martin and Sylvia Escher (RVI 1786)

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Hada Master (Attributed), Rao Jagat Singh of Kota at ease in a garden. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1660. Opaque watercolor on paper. Image: 10 5/8 x 6 15/16 in. (27 x 17.7 cm). Private Collection

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Early Master at the Court of Mandi (Attributed). The gopis pleading with Krishna to return their clothes: folio from a Bhagavata Purana series. Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1635–50. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 11 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (29.8 x 19.7 cm). Page: 13 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. (34.9 x 23.5 cm). The Kronos Collections

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Ruknuddin, Vishnu with Lakshmi enthroned, on a roof terrace. Bikaner, Rajasthan, dated 1678. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 7 5/8 x 10 3/16 in. (19.3 x 25.8 cm). Page: 10 7/16 x 12 5/16 in. (26.5 x 32.8 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Bequest of Lucy Randolph (RVI 1854)

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Kripal of Nurpur (Attributed), Devi parades in triumph. Nurpur, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1660–70. Opaque watercolor, gold and beetle-wing cases on paper, 7 5/16 x 10 11/16 in. (18.5 x 27.2 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, permanent loan, Collection of Barbara and Eberhard Fischer, on loan to the Museum Rietberg Zürich 

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Devidasa of Nurpur, Shiva and Parvati playing chaupar: folio from a Rasamanjari series. Basohli, Jammu, dated 1694–95. Opaque watercolor, ink, silver, and gold on paper. Painting: 6 1/2 x 10 7/8 in. (16.5 x 27.6 cm). Page: 8 x 12 1/4 in. (20.3 x 31.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Dr. J. C. Burnett, 1957 (57.185.2)

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Devidasa of Nurpur, Shiva and Parvati as Ardhanishvara: folio from the Rasamanjari II series. Nurpur/Basohli, Himachal Pradesh/Jammu, dated 1694–95. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 6 3/4 x 11 3/16 in. (17.1 x 28.4 cm). The San Diego Museum of Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection (1990.1043).

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Bahu Masters. King Dasaratha and his retinue proceed to Rama’s wedding: folio from the Shangri II Ramayana series. Bahu, Jammu, ca. 1690–1710. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 7 3/4 x 11 5/8 in. (19.7 x 29.5 cm). Page: 8 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (22.2 x 31.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, The Dillon Fund, Evelyn Kranes Kossak, and Anonymous Gifts, 1994. (1994.310)

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 Bahu Masters. Vasishtha visits Rama: folio from the Shangri I Ramayana series. Bahu, Jammu, 1680–90. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Page: 8 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (21.6 x 31.8 cm). Private Collection

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 Bahu Masters. Raga Madhava: folio from a Ragamala series. Bahu, Jammu, ca. 1720. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 6 5/16 x 5 29/32 in. (16 x 15 cm). Page: 7 29/32 x 7 5/16 in. (20 x 18.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Collection of Alice Boner (RVI 1226)

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 Master at the Court of Mankot. Celebrations of Krishna’s birth: page from a Bhagavata Purana series.  Mankot, Jammu, ca. 1700–25. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Image: 9 x 6 in. (22.9 x 15.2 cm). Page: 11 3/4 x 8 3/8 in. (29.8 x 22.2 cm). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Edward L. Whittemore Fund (1988.70)

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 Stipple Master (Attributed), Maharana Amar Singh II riding a Jodhpur horse. Udaipur, Rajasthan, ca. 1700–1710. paque watercolor and ink on paper. ainting: 13 3/16 x 10 3/4 in. (33.5 x 27.3 cm). Page: 14 11/16 x 12 1/8 in. (37.3 x 30.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky Fund, 2002 (2002.177) 

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Kota Master A (Attributed), Ram Singh I of Kota hunting rhinoceros. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1700. Opaque watercolor on paper. Page: 12 5/8 x 18 3/4 in. (32.1 x 47.6 cm). Private Collection 

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 Kota Master A (Attributed), Ram Singh I of Kota hunting at Makundgarh. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1690. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Page: 13 5/32 x 10 19/32 in. (33.5 x 26.8 cm). Private Collection 

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 Kota Master C (Attributed), Emperor Farrukhsiyar being paraded in a palanquin. Kota, Rajastha,. ca. 1713. Opaque watercolor on paper. Page: 14 3/16 x 9 3/16 in. (36 x 23.3 cm). Gursharan S. and Elvira Sidhu 

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 Chitarman II (Attributed), Emperor Muhammad Shah with falcon viewing his garden at sunset from a palanquin. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1730. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 15 1/16 x 16 3/4 in. (38.3 x 42.5 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Arthur Mason Knapp Fund (26.283) 

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 Mir Kalan Khan (Attributed), Baz Bahadur and Rupmati hawking. Mughal, Delhi, ca. 1735. Opaque watercolor on paper, 8 3/16 x 10 1/2 in. (20.8 x 26.6 cm). Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection 

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 Manaku, South wind cools in the Himalayas: folio from a Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, dated 1730. Opaque watercolor on paper, 8 3/8 x 12 1/16 in. (21.2 x 30.7 cm). National Museum, New Delhi (51.207/9) 

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First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, South wind cools in the Himalayas: folio from the second Guler Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1730. paque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 1/8 x 10 in. (15.6 x 25.4 cm). Page: 6 1/8 x 10 13/16 in. (17.8 x 27.4 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection (A 6) 

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 Manaku, Krishna playing blindman’s bluff. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1750–1755. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper9 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. (24.5 x 17.2 cm). The Kronos Collections 

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Nainsukh (Attributed), Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota worships Krishna and Radha. Jasrota, Himachal Pradesh ca. 1745 – 1750. Opaque watercolor, ink, silver and gold on paper, 7 3/4 x 6 1/8 in. (19.7 x 15.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1994 (1994.377) 

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 Nainsukh (Attributed), Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota viewing a painting presented by the artist Nainsukh. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1745 – 1750. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 8 1/4 x 11 13/16 in. (21 x 30 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Balthasar and Nanni Reinhart (RVI 1551) 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, Krishna and Radha enjoy a winter’s evening on the roof terrace, in the month of Margashirsha (November-December): folio from a Baramasa series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh ca. 1780. Opaque watercolor, gold and silver-colored paint on paper, 11 1/16 x 8 1/8 in. (28.1 x 20.6 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art, Alvin O. Bellak Collection, 2004 (2004-149-76) 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, The Village beauty: folio from the Guler Bihari Satsai series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1785. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper, 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 in. (19 x 13 cm). The Kronos Collections 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh. Krishna with Radha in a forest glade: folio from the second Guler Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1775. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 9/16 x 10 1/16 in. (16.6 x 25.6 cm). Page: 6 7/8 x 10 13/16 in. (17.5 x 27.5 cm). Collection of Barbara and Eberhard Fischer, on permanent loan to the Museum Rietberg Zürich (REF 35)

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 Purkhu (Attributed). Krishna flirting with the gopis, to Radha’s sorrow: folio from a Gita Govinda series. Kangra, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1760. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 9 7/16 x 12 5/8 in. (24 x 32 cm). Page: 11 x 14 5/16 in. (28 x 36.3 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Bequest of Lucy Rudolph (RVI 1852)

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 Bagta (Attributed). Kunvar Anop Singh hawking. Devgarh, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1777. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 14 3/16 x 10 7/16 in. (36 x 26.5 cm). Page: 16 1/8 x 11 5/8 in. (41 x 29.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Carlo Fleischmann Foundation (RVI 2198)

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 Bagta. Rawat Gokul Das II at Singh Sagar Lake Palace, Devgarh, shooting fowl. Devgarh, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1806. Opaque watercolor with gold and silver on paper, 21 5/8 x 31 1/2 in. (55 x 80 cm). The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, lent by Howard Hodgkin (LI.118.80)

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 Chokha (Attributed), Escapade at night: a nobleman climbs a rope to visit his lover. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1800–1810. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 11 1/2 x 14 7/8 in. (29.2 x 37.8 cm). Page: 12 1/4 x 16 1/8 in. (31 x 40.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2006. (2006.451)

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 Master of the Company School. Four tribesmen. Delhi region, Haryana, ca. 1815–1816. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 9 3/16 x 14 3/4 in. (23.3 x 37.4 cm). Page: 12 3/8 x 17 1/16 in. (31.4 x 43.4 cm). The David Collection, Copenhagen, (60/2007)

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 Tara. Maharana Sarup Singh and his courtiers on elephants celebrating the festival of Holi. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1850. Opaque watercolor on paper, 35 13/16 x 50 in. (91 x 127 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2010.T.0011)

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 Tara. Maharana Sarup Singh inspects a prize stallion. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1845–1846. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 16 3/4 x 22 3/4 in. (42.5 x 57.8 cm). Page: 19 x 24 7/8 in. (48.3 x 63.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky Fund, 2001 (2001.344)

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Tara. Portrait of Sarup Singh with attendants, after William Carpenter. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1851. Opaque watercolor on paper, 13 15/16 x 19 7/8 in. (35.5 x 50.5 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2010.T.0014)

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Shivalal, Maharana Fateh Singh’s hunting party crossing a river in a flood. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1893. Opaque watercolor on paper, 32 1/2 x 62 1/4 in. (82.5 x 158 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur, Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation (2010.T.0006)

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Photographer unknown, overpainted by Shivalal. Portrait of Jaswant Singh II of Jodhpur (1873–1896). Jodhpur, Rajasthan, ca. 1875. Albumen print, hand colored, 10 1/4 x 8 15/16 in. (26 x 22.7 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2008.06.0356

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The Painter [Chitaro] Tara. Photograph, 3 5/16 x 2 1/16 in. (8.4 x 5.3 cm). Pictorial Archives of the Maharanas of Mewar, The City Palace Museum, Udaipur

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Photographer unknown, Portrait of Mohanlal with his camera. Udaipure, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1875. Albumen print, 3 7/8 x 2 5/16 in. (9.8 x 5.8 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2008.01.0104

The Vintage Vietnamese Indochine Picture Collections

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE VINTAGE VIETNAMESE INDOCHINE PICUTRES COLLECTIONS

“Le destin tragique du Prince Vinh San”, l’empereur Duy Tân, à Paris

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L’empereur Duy Tân

Paris (AVI) – Une exposition sur la vie d’un des derniers empereurs de la dynastie Nguyên, Duy Tân (1900-1945), s’est ouverte au siège de l’Union Générale des Vietnamiens de France à Paris.

Intitulée “Le destin tragique du Prince Vinh San”, elle est organisée par un de ses fils, M. Claude Vinh San (Nguyen Phuoc Bao Vang) et a attiré de nombreux Vietnamiens résidant en France.

Présentés chronologiquement, les 24 tableaux contenant des photos reflètent de différentes étapes de la vie courte et mouvementée d’un empereur de l’An Nam : vie d’empereur, celle d’un d’exilé et celle d’un résistant.

Né le 3 Août 1900 à Hue, le Prince Vinh San est descendant direct de l’empereur Gia Long, fondateur de la dynastie des Nguyen. Intronisé à l’âge de 7 ans sous le nom de Duy Tan, il ne règne que 9 ans, de 1907 à 1916. En 1916, après une révolte contre le Protectorat français, l’empereur Duy Tan a été arrêté, détrôné puis déporté à l’île de la Réunion. Durant 24 ans d’exil, le feu de la résistance a toujours brûlé dans son âme. En 1940, il a répondu à l’appel du Général De Gaulle contre l’occupation des ennemies étrangères, dès les premiers jours de la résistance sur cette petite île en plein Océan indien et a été promu au grade de Colonel. Le 26 décembre 1945, l’avion Lockheed Lodester C-60 transportant à son bord le Prince Vinh San s’est écrasé près du village de M’Baiki (République d’Afrique centrale).

En mars 1987, les restes du Prince Vinh San, empereur d’An Nam au nom de Duy Tan, ont été rapatriés et enterrés à Huê, sa ville natale. – AVI

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L’empereur Duy Tân et son entourage

L’Empereur d’Annam en costume de ville

a

L’Empereur d’Annam en costume de ville (ao dài)

Cartes postales d’Annam : Hué les musiciens du roi à la répétition

d

 

Cartes postales d’Annam : Tête du cortège du Roi d’Annam

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Cartes postales d’Annam : HUE — Pavillons au Tombeau de Tu-Duc

c

postales d’Annam : HUE – Le Chef des Comédiens du Roi et 3 Acteurs

b

Collection P. Dieulefils, 53 Rue Jules Ferry, Hanoï. (Indochine Française

 

Sélection de cartes postales anciennes sur Huê

2

Annam, Huê. Les musiciens du Roi jouant sous le soleil du Portique Radieux

2

Annam, Huê. Elephant caparaçonné contenant la foule pendant les fêtes

02

Huê (Annam). Porte monumentale, dite Hien Dhon(?)

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de l’empereur Dông Khanh

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Annam, Huê. Chef des Makouis et ses satellites. Scène diabolique jouée au Palais

05

Annam, Huê. Les deux Reines par Dieulefils

03

Annam, Huê. Thiên Tri (Temple de la Lumière)

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Annam, Huê. Porte d’entrée du Co Mât

08

Annam, Huê. Tibunes Cavalier du Roi, vue des jardins

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Minh Mang (Temple de la Lumière)

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Tu Duc (Temple de la Stèle)

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Annam, Huê. Annam, Huê. Porte du Palais Co Mât par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Temple des Edits

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Annam, Huê. Eléphants traversant une rivière.

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Annam, Huê. Rotissage d’un boeuf

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Annam, Huê. Allée des Portiques de droite conduisant au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

2

Annam, Huê. Les Corbeilles de Fleurs

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Annam, Huê. Groupe de femmes annamites par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Le tombeau de Gia Long (la triple enceinte) par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Ensemble des cours et pagodes du tombeau de Minh Mang par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Cours et pagodes au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Pagode où se font les cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Porte de l’enceinte extérieure au tombeau de Minh Mang

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Annam, Huê. Groupe d’ennuques par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Palais du Prince Tuyên Hoà, frère du Roi par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Cours et pagode au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Une colonne commémorative au tombeau de Thiêu Tri par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. La Montagne du Roi et le Cercle de la Rive Droite par Dieulefils

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Annam, Huê. Le Cavalier du roi, vu de la Trbune

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Annam, Huê. Palais de l’Empereur. Le Trône

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Annam, Huê. Tombeau de Tu Duc

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Annam, Huê. La fête du Nam Giao en 1933

Vietnam: Histoires de mandarins malmenés

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Dans la littérature populaire du Vietnam, les mandarins, serviteurs du roi, sont toujours critiqués, même moqués par les contes égrillards. Ces anecdotes révèlent l’esprit frondeur du peuple.

Dans la riche gamme narrative de l’ancienne littérature populaire du Vietnam, essentiellement paysanne, figurent les fables et les contes égrillards. Tandis que les fables s’attaquent indirectement et prudemment aux travers sociaux par le truchement d’animaux, les contes égrillards le font de façon beaucoup plus brutale, affichant ouvertement leur mépris en vers les puissants.

Voici quelques exemples de contes tournant en ridicule les mandarins, serviteurs du roi souvent arrogants et fléaux du peuple :

Un certain Tri huyên (mandarin chef de district) passait pour être d’une intégrité sans faille. Cette intégrité en imposait à tous, même à sa femme. Il arriva que les notables d’un village en querelle avec le village voisin voulurent obtenir la protection du mandarin pour gagner le procès. Rien n’y fit. Les notables s’adressèrent alors à sa femme.

- Mon époux est l’intégrité même. Si j’acceptais de vous le moindre cadeau et que par hasard il l’apprenne, il me le reprocherait même 20 ans après.

Pourtant, devant leur insistance, elle convint d’une solution possible.

- Mon mari est né l’Année du Rat. Si Messiers les notables veulent mettre en pratique leur très gracieuse idée, qu’ils fondent un rat en argent, et j’essaierai d’intercéder en leur faveur.

Ainsi fut fait et ledit village de couler un gros rat d’égout en bon et bel argent massif qu’on apporte à la dame du mandarin. Celle-ci le mit de côté et n’en souffla mot au mari. Vingt ans après, le mandarin ayant pris sa retraite se trouva un jour gêné. Voyant le rat d’argent, il en demanda à sa femme la provenance. Et celle-ci dit toute la vérité :

- Où aviez-vous, ma chérie, mis votre intelligence ? Rien ne vous empêchait de dire que j’étais de l’Année du Buffle.

Un autre conte ironise la pseudo-intégrité des mandarins :

Un mandarin, ne vous déplaise, portait le nom Liêm (Intégrité). Il vint un jour dans une maison de chanteuses (geishas). L’une des pensionnaires se nommait Tiêt (Chasteté). Notre mandarin ne put s’empêcher de sourire.

- Comment, dit-il, il existe une personne parmi vous répondre à cette belle appellation ?

Et la chanteuse a répondu :

- Mais oui, Monsieur le Mandarin, qu’y a-t-il à cela d’étrange, puisque dans le mandarinat, on ose encore choisir le nom d’Intégrité (Liêm) !

Les mandarins militaires non plus ne sont épargnés :

Un certain commandant portait toujours son fusil au côté sans vraiment savoir s’en servir. Il s’était en vain fait planter une cible derrière sa maison mais n’avait jamais pu l’atteindre. La malchance aidant, il reçut un jour l’ordre de partir au front. Ce premier baptême du feu pour lui fut cuisant. Il allait être acculé à une défaite mémorable et peut-être y perdra la vie quand un génie survint et l’emporta dans la forêt. Perdu au milieu des fourrés, notre commandant reprit ses esprits et demanda :

- Veuillez me faire savoir dans quel lieu je me trouve et pourquoi vous m’avez sauvé ?

- Qu’à cela ne tienne, je suis le génie de la cible que vous avez plantée derrière votre maison. Vous m’avez toujours épargné. J’ai voulu, en ce jour, mon bienfaiteur, vous prouver ma reconnaissance.

À propos des flèches décochées par le peuple aux mandarins, il faut mentionner les contes virulents du fameux Trang Quynh (Premier docteur Quynh) qui ose s’attaquer au mandarin des mandarins, le Seigneur Trinh.

Un jour, le Seigneur Trinh qui prend Quynh en grippe, charge ses gardes de renverser la maison de ce dernier.

- Faites, leur dit Quynh, mais gardez-vous de crier et de rire, sinon je vous coupe la langue.

Or il était d’usage de s’aider de cris pour tirer une lourde charge.

Une autre fois, les soldats du Seigneur reçoivent l’ordre de se soulager dans la maison même de Quynh, qui leur dit :

- Répandez volontiers vos selles, mais interdiction d’uriner, sinon je vous coupe l’anus et testicules.

Comment, en fait, auraient-ils pu le faire? Ne saisissant en rien l’invraisemblance de la menace, de nombreux soldats abandonnèrent leur tâche. Quelques-uns seulement eurent l’idée d’apporter une épuisette en noix de coco en prévision.

À quelque temps de là, Quynh fit acheter un gros navet qu’il fit apporter au palais de Trinh. Le Seigneur s’en régala en demandant la provenance. Quynh répondit :

- Je me suis permis, Seigneur, de vous l’offrir car ce sont vos propres gens qui l’ont fumé.

De telles anecdotes révèlent l’esprit frondeur du peuple. Le personnage semi-fictif de Trang Quynh nous fait penser à Till l’Espiègle de la tradition germanique. (Huu Ngoc/CVN

*Cochinchine, Cambodge, c. 1910. Saïgon, Cholon, Arroyo, Phnom-Penh, Angkor, Annam, Tonkin, baie d’Along, types ethnographiques,

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*Cochinchine, Cambodge, c. 1910. Saïgon, Cholon, Arroyo, Phnom-Penh, Angkor, Annam, Tonkin, baie d’Along, types ethnographiques, scènes de genre…”

Ensemble de 2 albums ayant appartenu au sous-officier Raymond de Padirac (2e bataillon de sénégalais) contenant 130 cartes postales anciennes par Planté Photo, Mottet et divers. 14 x 9 cm.  Estimé : 150 / 200 €

On joint : Mr et Mme J. Pannier, Trois ans en Indochine. Notes de Voyage (Toulouse, 1906). Exemplaire de Raymond de Padirac. Nombreuses reproductions photographiques sur la région.

Pierre DIEULEFIS (1862-1937) et AUTRES – INDOCHINE 1899/ 1903

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Pierre DIEULEFIS (1862-1937) et AUTRES – INDOCHINE 1899/ 1903

Album (reliure en mauvais état) renfermant 66 tirages montés sur carton légendés et datés à l’encre sur les montages de divers formats jusqu’à 20,5 x17, 5cm. Estimation : 1 000 / 1 200 €

Note: Plusieurs tirages signés Dieulefis dans les négatifs, d’autres dont des types ethnographiques certainement par lui que l’on retrouvera un peu plus tard dans ses éditions de cartes postales .

Certains tirages pales , ceux concernant les types(16) en bon état.
Poste de Tranh Bach, Exposition de Hanoi 1903, défilés de troupes à Bac Ninh, revue à Hanoi ,exécution de Cat chef pirate,cadouille, femmes de pirates capturées par la Garde Indigène à la cangue, Tirailleurs Tonkinois, Famille Thos, Fabricants de papier , Femmes Nam, Femme Pou-La, Jeune fille Man Coc, Gardes Indigènes…

PHILIPPE-JACQUES POTTEAU (1807-1876) – Portraits indochinois, 1863

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PHILIPPE-JACQUES POTTEAU (1807-1876), Portraits indochinois, 1863.

Lot 38. 10 épreuves d’époque sur papier albuminé montées sur supports cartonnés. Étiquette au dos de chacun des montages portant les noms des personnes, leur fonction et les mentions “Collection anthropologique du Muséum de Paris” et “Ambassade Cochinchinoise à Paris”. Format moyen : 17,5 x 13 cm. (Average size : 6,9 x 5,1 in.) – Estimation : 5 000 / 7 000 €

Provenance : collection Texbraun à l’actuel propriétaire.

Etude Piasa, Photographies Anciennes, Modernes et Contemporaines. Vente du 16 novembre 2007. www.piasa.fr

 

Portrait de l’Empereur Bao Dai par le Studio Harcourt

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Portrait de l’Empereur Bao Dai par le Studio Harcourt

Cette photo, en tirage argentiquen de format 18 x 24 cm, a été proposée à 100 € + 5 € d’envoi et n’a pas trouvé preneur ce jour.

  

L’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam

The Order of the Dragon of Annam: founded by Emperor Dong Khanh on 14th March 1886. Awarded in five classes (1. Grand Cordon, 2. Grand Officer, 3. Commander, 4. Officer, and 5. Knight) with two ribbons (red with gold border stripes by the Emperor, and green with gold border stripes by the French President).

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The Order of the Dragon – Grand Cordon, breast star

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The Order of the Dragon – Officer, breast badge with “colonial ribbon”

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Croix de chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (face et dos) (photo e-bay)

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Croix de chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (photo e-bay)

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Diplôme de Chevalier de l’Ordre du Dragon d’Annam (1875)

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Croix de chevalier (au dos : ovale alu collé : La Gerbe d’Or, CHAPUS 86 rue de Rivoli Paris) (photo ebay)

Deux nouvelles photos de l”Empereur Khai Dinh

Visite de l’Empereur Khai Dinh au Palais

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Arrivée de l’Empereur Khai Dinh au Palais Kien Trung

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Rare Album artisanal d’un recueil de 20 photographies couvrant le couronnement de l’empereur Bao-Dai le 8 janvier 1928

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Rare Album artisanal d’un recueil de 20 photographies couvrant le couronnement de l’empereur Bao-Dai le 8 janvier 1928

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Cet ouvrage  a été réalisé à Hué par les établissement Tang-Vinh  rue Paul Bert. Tirages noir et blanc au format 11,8 x 17cm. Les légendes son réalisées sur une bande de papier ajoutée en dessous. Les 20 photographies sont :
1 Arrivée à Hué de S.A le prince Vinh-Thuy
2 Arrivée du prince au palais
3 Réception du prince par la cour
4 Cérémonie de prosternation
5 S.M Bao Dai se rend au palais
6 Arrivée au palais
7 Arrivée de Mr le gouverneur Varenne
8 Assistance européenne
9 Position des mandarins avant de faire des Lays deavant Thai Hoa
10 2èmè phase des Lays
11 Les mandarins de rang inférieur à genoux
12 Après l’intronisation S.M Bao Dai rentre au palais
13 Sortie  de S.M Bao Dai en litière par la porte dorée
14 Bao Dai gagne à pied la pagode de Thé Mieu
15 S.M en position pour les lays dans la pagode de Thé Mieu
16 S.M sort de la pagode, saluée vparr S.E le Régent
17 Retour de la pagode
18 Visite de S.M à la 1ère reine sa grand mère ( en pousse pousse doré)
19 Visite de S.M à la reine 2ème reine sa grand mère
20 Salle du trône

Cet ouvrage a été vendu le 6 novembre 2007 sur ebay pour 202,99 € + 2,30 € d’envoi.

 

Art du Champa : Site de My Son

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Site de My Son. Fouilles de Henri Parmentier et de Charles Carpeaux en 1903-1904, mise en place d’un palan (photothèque EFEO, PAR01584, cliché H. Parmen

Restauration de la plus vieille maison communale du Vietnam à Hà Tây

La province de Hà Tây (Nord) a récemment commencé la restauration de la plus ancienne maison communale du pays. Construite au 16e siècle, la maison communale de Thuy Phiêu, dans la commune de Thuy An, district de Ba Vi, sera rénovée pendant un an. Coût des travaux: 7 milliards de dôngs. Cette maison communale est dédiée au culte de Tan Viên, un des 4 génies les plus puissants de la mythologie vietnamienne. (CVN)

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Je recommande Le Dinh, maison communale du Viêt Nam” sous la direction de Hà Van Tân / Nguyên Van Ku, Editions Thê Gioi / Ecole française d’Extrême-Orient.

La première édition de ce livre a été publié en vietnamien et en anglais sous le titre “Dinh Viêt Nam, Community Hall in Vietnam, NXB. TP Hô Chi Minh, 1998 “
Traductions : Tran Son Mach, Philippe Papin, Philippe Le Failler
Photographies : Nguyên Van Ku, Nguyen Thanh Liêm

La cathédrale de Phat Diêm ou qu’est-ce que l’acculturation ?

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La cathédrale de Phat Diêm, province de Ninh Binh (Nord), à 121 km au sud de Hanoi, a été à l’époque de la colonisation française un haut lieu du catholicisme dans le Nord. Mais, plus encore, c’est là l’un des premiers exemples architecturaux de l’acculturation qui a eu lieu au cours de cette période.
Il y a quelques semaines de cela maintenant, Alain J. Lemaître, docteur en ethnologie, en histoire et en lettres, maître de conférences en histoire moderne à l’Université de Haute Alsace, donnait à l’occasion de la Journée internationale de la Francophonie une conférence sur l’acculturation. Ce terme né dans le champ de l’ethnologie décrit “l’ensemble des phénomènes résultant d’un contact continu entre 2 groupes culturels différents provoquant des changements dans les 2 groupes”.

Dans la perspective coloniale, ces phénomènes étaient perçus comme unidirectionnels puisque l’idée dominante était celle d’une suprématie de la culture européenne. Ainsi, seule la culture indigène se modifierait au contact de la culture des colonisateurs, ne faisant que reproduire tels quels les us et coutumes de celle-ci. Cependant, suite à la décolonisation et à l’indépendance des peuples, l’ethnologie a réajusté cette notion en intégrant l’idée d’une bidimensionnalité aux échanges culturels, idée qui fait aujourd’hui consensus au sein de la communauté scientifique. Lors d’un contact continu entre 2 groupes, il n’y a pas seulement intégration d’une nouvelle culture mais aussi maintien de la culture d’origine qui produit un impact sur la manière dont se fait l’acculturation et sur son résultat.

La situation de l’Asie au moment de la colonisation était de plus particulière. En effet, l’Europe rencontre alors des civilisations millénaires qui connaissent l’écriture (depuis même plus longtemps qu’elle) et qui, par conséquent, ont une mémoire écrite. Ce fut là une différence capitale avec, par exemple, les civilisations de l’Amérique du Sud. De culture majoritairement orale, elles se montrèrent beaucoup moins résistantes au contact d’une autre culture, et ce d’autant plus que celle-ci fut imposée par la force. Ainsi, si certains pays d’Amérique du Sud, tels que le Pérou, une partie du Mexique et du Guatemala, conservent des traits très forts de leur culture originelle, la plupart des autres ne présentent que de très rares éléments autochtones comme c’est le cas par exemple au Chili. Une autre différence qui fait la particularité de l’Asie à cette époque réside dans la manière dont les contacts entre les cultures se sont effectués. Les colonies en Asie ne furent pas des colonies de peuplement. Les Européens procédèrent par l’établissement de comptoirs qui laissaient de côté des territoires immenses et très peuplés. Les contacts avec la culture occidentale étaient ainsi indirects et laissaient une plus grande marge de manœuvre aux indigènes, susceptibles d’assimiler plus librement les éléments de la culture dominante.

Durant la colonisation française au Vietnam, il y eut effectivement acculturation. Toutefois, cela n’a pas seulement conduit à l’intégration de la culture européenne mais aussi, fort heureusement, au maintien de la culture indigène. L’architecture de la cathédrale de Phat Diêm est l’une des premières manifestations de ce phénomène culturel.

Un exemple architectural d’acculturation
Haut lieu du catholicisme dans le Nord à l’époque de la colonisation française, la division du pays en 1954 entraîna le départ en masse vers le Sud de catholiques et la fermeture du sanctuaire. Ce qui est appelée “cathédrale de Phat Diêm” regroupe en fait de nombreux édifices dont la construction fut achevée en 1891. L’ensemble fut fondé par un prêtre vietnamien du nom de Six dont le tombeau se trouve sur le parvis de la cathédrale, bâtiment principal. Tout autour se dressent plusieurs sortes de chapelles, chacune dédiée à un saint. Cependant, si en visitant ce lieu de culte catholique, vous vous attendez à retrouver les grandes tours qui font la caractéristique de ces bâtiments, vous repartirez déçus. Tout en pierre, aux toits incurvés semblables à ceux d’une pagode, l’architecture de ce lieu s’inspire largement de celle des temples bouddhistes. Le mélange des 2 cultures est ici indéniable.

Le prêtre Six a veillé à représenter les éléments principaux du village vietnamien, à savoir la maison communale, l’étang et l’arbre nourricier tandis qu’un clocher, élément indispensable à tout lieu de culte catholique s’élève à l’arrière de la cathédrale. Toutefois, au premier étage de ce clocher, on retrouve un tambour de taille imposante, instrument utilisé pour sonner l’heure dans la religion bouddhiste. Au second étage, est suspendue une cloche, forgée toutefois selon le modèle oriental. Elle possède 4 points de contacts pour sonner l’heure, un par saison. Chacune d’elles est identifiée par un sinogramme tandis qu’un chant de prière est inscrit sur celle-ci en langue latine. Quatre petites tours se dressent à chaque coin du bâtiment, chacune surmontée d’une représentation d’un saint. Toutefois, alors que ceux-ci sont traditionnellement représentés debout, ici, ils sont assis à la manière du Bouddha.

Quittons la cathédrale pour entrer dans l’une des nombreuses chapelles entourant celle-ci. Les traces de l’influence de la culture européenne se mêlant à celle sino-vietnamienne demeurent. Au fond de la chapelle, se dresse un autel de pierre surmonté d’une statue de la Vierge Marie. Les bas-reliefs sur la face frontale de cet autel présentent les symboles occidentaux de la pureté : un jardin ainsi qu’un puits fermés. Les faces latérales quant à elles, sont gravées de fleurs de lotus, représentation de cette même idée de pureté dans l’imaginaire oriental.

L’importance d’une politique culturelle
L’architecture sino-vietnamienne d’inspiration européenne de ce bâtiment n’est qu’un des nombreux exemples de l’impact de la culture européenne sur la culture vietnamienne lors de la colonisation. Cela montre toutefois que, dans le cas du Vietnam, la culture indigène n’a pas été détruite mais maintenue. Ceci s’explique pour une grande part, par sa tradition de culture écrite qui a permis de forger une identité collective forte, c’est-à-dire un ensemble de caractères qui unissent les hommes et femmes d’un même groupe mais qui les distinguent également des autres groupes.

Ainsi, quelle que soit la force de l’acculturation sur un plan économique et même social, le fait qu’il existe une culture écrite permettant de forger une identité collective forte, autorise un échange entre les cultures (échange au demeurant toujours inégal) et non une destruction de celles-ci. Toutefois, aujourd’hui, peut-être plus qu’hier, la culture est intiment liée au domaine économique, facilitant d’autant la destruction de systèmes culturels.

D’où la nécessité pour chaque pays de défendre celle-ci par une politique culturelle capable de faire face aux enjeux de la mondialisation. Tel est l’objectif de la convention pour la promotion et la protection de la diversité culturelle, établie par l’UNESCO en octobre 2005. L’importance des enjeux soulevés par ce traité est largement reconnue au niveau international puisque depuis lors, il a été signé et ratifié par 56 pays et l’Union européenne (en tant qu’unité régionale). Le fait que les États-Unis, dont le secteur culturel occupe une place majeure dans l’économie américaine, s’oppose à son adoption lors du vote à l’UNESCO, ne fait que confirmer cette idée. (Anaïs Chavanne /CVN

 

Document à l’entête de la “MAISON DE L’EMPEREUR . CABINET DU GRAND-MAÎTRE DES CEREMONIES “

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Document à l’entête de la “MAISON DE L’EMPEREUR . CABINET DU GRAND-MAÎTRE DES CEREMONIES “- “A PARIS , le ? 186?”
“Reçu une lettre de son ? le Grand Maître de Cérémonie de l’Empereur” – “Le 1er ambassadeur de S.M. le roi d’Annam” – Signature calligraphique de Phan Thanh Giang.
(Etat: pli horizontal marqué et bords poussiéreux) – prti à 136 € + 1,20 €

-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Trésor, 1952 & Le Marché de Tân Dinh, 1953

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Sud-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Trésor, 1952

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 Sud-Vietnam, Saïgon, Le Marché de Tân Dinh, 1953

Annam, Huê. Vue sur la Pagode des Cantonais

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Annam, Huê. Vue sur la Pagode des Cantonais

 Annam, Huê. Eléphants royaux à l’entrée du Palais.

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Annam, Huê. Eléphants royaux à l’entrée du Palais.

 Annam. Montagnes de marbre près Tourane – Chef ou Pape des bonzes

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Annam. Montagnes de marbre près Tourane – Chef ou Pape des bonzes

Annam, Huê. Gardiennes et servantes chargées des Cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Thiêu Tri.

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Annam, Huê. Gardiennes et servantes chargées des Cérémonies rituelles au tombeau de Thiêu Tri.

 ANNAM. Obséques de SM KHAI DINH. Acteurs, 1925

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Annam. Obséques de SM Khai Dinh. Acteurs, 1925

 “Intronisation de S.M. Bao Dai dernier Empereur d’ANNAM – Musique traditionnelle au Palais Thai Hoà” le 08 janvier 1926

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“Intronisation de S.M. Bao Dai  dernier Empereur d’ANNAM -  Musique traditionnelle au Palais Thai Hoà” le 08 janvier 1926 

Annam. Mandarin rendant la justice.

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Annam. Mandarin rendant la justice

PHOTO OF THE DELEGATION OF PHAN THANH GIAN IN PARIS IN 1863 BY Disdéri.
 

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Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mandarins who participated in the peace treaty

Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,

Albumen print, 24 x 28 cm.

A photograph of Disdéri (catalog No. 104, albumen print, 24 x 28 cm, Disderi stamp on the carton, estimate € 1000/1200) will be sold at the Galerie de Chartres May 7, 2011. It represents a group portrait, “Mandarins who participated in the peace treaty in Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,” the delegation is sent to Saigon by Emperor Tu Duc to negotiate the peace treaty of 1862.

By the treaty signed June 5, 1862 and ratified on 16 April 1863 Hue, Vietnam cedes to France the three eastern provinces (Gia Dinh, Bien Hoa and My Tho) and the islands of Con Dao (Pulo Condor) opens three ports (including Da Nang) to trade between France and Spain, will pay a war indemnity of four million dollars and finally tolerate the freedom of Christian worship. The two principal ambassadors were then Phan Thanh Gian Lam Duy and Tiep. We know that during their stay in Saigon, Vice-Admiral Bonard had been photographed and the photographs had been the model for the engravings published in L’Illustration of November 29, 1862 bearing the words “from the photographs provided by M. Rigault, corresponding Vice-Admiral Bonard. “

Detail. Signatures of ambassadors

Disdéri of photography.

Three inscriptions in Chinese characters found on the carton assembly, between photography and Disderi stamp, bearing the names of three ambassadors:

Center: 正 使 潘清 简 Phan Thanh Gian chanh knew, “the first ambassador, HE Phan Thanh Gian (1796-1867)”

Right: 副使 笵 富庶 Pho Phu Pham Thu knew “Vice-Ambassador Pham Phu Thu”

Left: 陪 使 魏克 袒 boi knew Nguỵ Khac Djan, “Deputy Ambassador Nguy Khac Dan.”

Thus, it is not coming from the embassy in Saigon negotiate the Treaty of 1862 (ratified in Hue in April 1863), but the embassy that was from the Emperor Tu Duc in July 1863, under the pretext of thanking the gifts sent by Napoleon III, to negotiate the purchase of the three eastern provinces.

The delegation left Saigon on July 4, 1863 a French warship to reach Suez August 17th where she embarked on the Labrador to win Toulon on September 10. She arrived in Paris on September 13 and was received by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, M. Feuillet de Conches on the 18th September, on behalf of the emperor who was on holiday in Biarritz.

At the request of the Emperor Napoleon III, Jacques-Philippe Potteau (1807-1876), who was the successor of Louis Rousseau at the Natural History Museum and devoted himself to scientific and ethnographic photography, was designated to capture the photographic portrait the ambassador and his entourage. At the first meeting (September 20, 1863), he made two portraits of Ambassador Phan Thanh Gian, one sitting, the other foot (currently kept at the Laboratory of Anthropology of the Museum of Natural History in Paris, No. 10,608 and No. 10,610), one of Pham Phu Thu, one of Nguy Khac Dan and a group. These portraits were presented at the meeting of December 15, 1863.

Jacques-Philippe Potteau, Portrait of HE Phan Thanh Gian.

Laboratory of Anthropology Museum of Natural History, Paris.

In the Journal of the embassy, ​​Pham Phu Thu noted:

“At ngo (noon), the sky became a little calm. Dressed in the costume of the court, one by one we went to the floor of the hotel which is covered with glass, and we shoot we did. Here is the essence of photography: first we take a glass plate covered with a combination of liquids: it is placed behind a glass tube, before which stands the person who looks inside of the opposite tube, under the action of sunlight coming through the tube, the glass plate receives the impression of an image, there is not even a hair of difference. The Europeans used to do this operation with great desire. All those with whom we just want to know talk to you a portrait of the upper and lower are all the same, saying they see is the testimony of a memory reciprocal.

In the following, under the conduct of the staff, photographers often came with their camera to the hotel and invited us to shoot us, they gave us each a copy of these portraits. After the draw, each of the small amounts to a huge portraits, price of labor, those who are slightly larger cost 4 or 5 francs “(Pham Phu Thu, (trans. Tran Xuan Toan),” The Embassy of Phan Than Gian (1863-1864) “BAVH, 1921, p. 156.)

Thus, after Jacques-Philippe Potteau, Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri (1819-1889) was one of the photographers who were invited to capture the features of the Ambassador and the delegation. The photograph will be on sale May 7, 2011 Chartres was performed on this occasion.

In 1854, Disdéri invented a new camera which lets you play six shots on the same glass plate and patented the format of the card whose paternity of the invention is to be attributed either to Marseille Dodero Aguado. The fashion for portraits-cost cards spread rapidly in France.

In the Journal of the Embassy, ​​Pham Phu Thu noted that: “The 20th Day (1 November 1863) it rained. At vi (from 1 to 3 pm), Mr. Cam-ba-xa-the GIO, French Minister of Rites [Author's note: This is the Grand Master of Ceremonies], we did bring in an official letter which stated that “At vi (from 1 to 3 pm) the 24th day, he would take us, and in the middle of the same vi hours, we came to the Royal Court of France. “Soon after, Mr. Ha-ba-ly [Author's note: this is Mr. Aubaret, Commander, Officer of Foreign Affairs, who served as interpreter during the stay of the mission in France.] Brought us three cards and said that the Minister of Rites did convey his compliments to the three of us. At nightfall, he returned and took us three cards in response to the compliments of the Minister “(Pham Phu Thu (trans. Tran Xuan Toan),” The Embassy of Phan Thanh Gian, 1863-1864, “Bulletin Friends of Old Hue, 1921, No. 1-4, pp. 266-267).

Document signed by Phan Thanh Gian

Personal collection.

In October 2007, a document dated 01st November 1863, was sold on ebay. This is a certificate signed by the hand of Phan Thanh Gian confirming the receipt of a letter from the Grand Master of Ceremonies of the Emperor.

Phan Thanh Gian signatures

Left: on the document to the head of the Cabinet of the Emperor

Right: the photograph of Disdéri.

By comparing this signature with that appearing in the photograph of Disdéri, it is undeniable that this is the manual signature of Phan Thanh Gian. This photograph had to be carried out between November and December 1863.

The reception of the ambassadors of Annam was held November 7 at a public hearing at the Palais des Tuileries, after the return of the Empress Eugenie of Spain, where she was visiting her family. The emperor was not opposed to negotiations. He relied on the payment of 85 million promised by the king of Annam to offset the deficit of 972 million francs. After the reception, the negotiations began, and November 12, Le Moniteur Universal announced that the peace treaty of June 5, 1862 would be amended. Once his mission is completed, Phan Thanh Gian left France carrying with him his photographic portraits by Jacques-Philippe Potteau (01st November 1863) and Adolphe Eugene Disdéri (November-December 1863) and by other photographers.

Details: Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mandarins who participated in the treated

Peace in Hue (Annam) April 16, 1863,

Albumen print

ORIGINAL INFO IN fRENCH

PHOTO DE LA DELEGATION DE PHAN THANH GIAN A PARIS EN 1863 PAR DISDERI.

 

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.La savonnette au jasmin créée par mon père Vitrine du Musée de la Ville de Hô-Chi-Minh Ville En-tête et première publicité au Musée de la Ville de Hô-Chi-Min Moules à savon au Musée de la Ville de Hô-Chi-Minh Ville Le premier savon fabriqué par la Savonnerie familiale Co-Ba bar soap Un livre qui parle de mon grand père paternel Portrait de mon arrière grand-père, Mr Truong Quang Thanh Mon grand père, Mr Truong Van Bên, à Paris avenue Paul Doumer Monsieur et Madame Truong Van Bên Madame Bên et mon père, Mr Truong Khac Huê à 6 ans Madame Bên signant le registre de mariage de mes parents (24/09/1954) Mariage de mes parents dans la maison du culte de la famille Truong Mariage de mes parents  Une enveloppe de la Savonnerie VIETNAM de 1936 Publicité pour le Savon Vietnam Publicité pour le Savon Vietnam

 

__KGrHqJ__lQE5YyoCm0wBOdid_wY____60_12

Annam, Huê. le Président du Conseil dela famille royale en costume de cour.

__KGrHqR__lIE5cOwSdIvBOdpBrkH4w__60_3

Tonkin. Mandarin et ses enfants

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Annam. University Bachelor Students, 1908

The Chinese Qing Imperial silk Robe Embroidery Collections exhibition

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

The Chinese Imperial Silk Robe Embroidery Exhibitions

Veste kimono en velours frappé bleu nuit. Indochine 1900

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Veste kimono en velours frappé bleu nuit. Chine, 1900.

de motifs de fleurs, galons et doublure satin bleu, les boutons en pierre dure rose.

Textiles chinois

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Chine – robe en soie et tissu brodé,  fin du XIXème siècle. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor polychrome or de dragons, pics, emblèmes bouddhiques et ruyi se détachant sur fond corail.. Estimation : 3000/5000€

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Chine du Sud – 4 panneaux en soie et tissu brodé, circa 1900 (détail). Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de personnages, oiseaux et végétaux – fond rouge, ivoire ou jaune – Estimation : 1300/1500€

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Chine – 4 éléments de robes en soie et tissu brodé. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de volatiles, phénix et tigres – Dynastie Qing (petits accidents) – Estimation : 500/600€

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Chine – 4 éléments de robes en soie et tissu brodé. Dynastie Qing. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de volatiles, phénix et tigres – (petits accidents). Estimation : 500/600€

Chinese Rank Badges, Buzi @ Christie’s NY

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 A Rare Pair Of Brocade Gold-Ground Civil Official’s Rank Badges of a Peacock, Buzi. Late 17th-Early 18th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank and finely woven with a peacock (kongque) with spread wings and tail facing the sun and surrounded by ruyi-shaped clouds as it stands on one leg on a pierced rock emerging from a band of rolling waves tossed with ‘precious objects’, all in shades of blue, coral red, and turquoise reserved on a gold ground, all within a double blue line border; 10 7/8 in. x 12 in. (27.6 x 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame (2). Estimate $30,000 – $40,000

Provenance: Myrna Myers, Paris.

Notes: Rank badges of this type woven in brocade with a gold ground appear to be quite rare. A stylistically similar badge made for a military official of the fourth rank, woven in brocade with a lion on a gold ground, and dated to the Yongzheng period, is illustrated in the exhibition catalogue, Power Dressing: Textiles for Rulers and Priests from the Chris Hall Collection, Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore, 2006, no. 67. The rendering of the waves, rocks and clouds is quite similar on the two, as is the woven gold ground.

The use of badges applied to the front and back of court robes to indicate rank was instituted during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and continued through the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). While Ming dynasty badges were displayed on the court robe, Qing dynasty badges were moved to an outer garment, or surcoat.

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 A Very Rare Pair Of Embroidered Gauze Military Official’s Rank Badges of Panthers, Buzi. Early 18th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a sixth rank military official, finely embroidered in counted stitch on a dark blue gauze ground with a panther (biao) standing between two upright rock formations surrounded by clouds, above a lishui stripe, and all within a cloud border, in muted shades of ivory, beige, blue, pale green, pale gold and pale russet, within an outer border of couched gold key fret; 9¾ in. x 10 in. (24.8 x 25.4 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $25,000 – $35,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Seed Pearl-Embroidered Dark Blue Silk Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Peacock, Buzi. Late 18th-19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank, unusually embroidered with seed pearls on the body and spread wings of the peacock (kongque) shown facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from froth-capped waves tossed with ‘precious objects,’ flanked by a fruiting peach and narcissus to one side and peony and lingzhi to the other, and surrounded by the wufu and lingzhi-shaped clouds, all satin-stitched in muted shades of blue, coral, yellow and white, within a key-fret border of couched gold thread; 12 x 12½ in. (30.5 x 31.8 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $12,000 – $18,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Literature: L. Wrigglesworth, The Badge of Rank, London, 1990, p. 39.

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A Rare Seed Pearl-Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Crane, Buzi. Mid-19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the first rank and finely worked in satin stitch and seed stitch, the seed pearl-embroidered crane (xianhe), shown facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from breaking waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ and bordered below by lingzhi-shaped clouds, flanked by peaches to one side and roses and lingzhi to the other, and surrounded by the wufu in flight amidst further clouds, all picked out in muted shades of blue, coral, grey, white and black, and couched gold thread, within an outer border of couched gold thread key fret; 12 in. (30.5 cm.) square, mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $10,000 – $15,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Notes: A crane rank badge with similar embroidery, color scheme and design, as well as the use of seed-pearls to highlight the body, dated to the Daoguang period, is illustrated by L. Wrigglesworth, The Badge of Rank III, London, 1996, p. 23.

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 A Pair Of Embroidered Dark Blue Silk Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Peacocks, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Each made for a civil official of the third rank and elaborately worked in Peking knot, the bird (kongque) shown looking at the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with Buddhist emblems and surrounded by leafy branches of peaches and roses as well as the wufu in flight amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, green, coral, yellow and white, and outlined in couched gold thread, all within a lotus spray and angular scroll border; 11¾ x 12½ in. (29.8 x 31.7 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $10,000 – $15,000 

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A Rare Pair Of Kesi Military Official’s Rank Badges of a Lion, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a military official of the second rank, finely woven with a blue lion (shizi) looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ above a band of ruyi-shaped clouds and a lishui stripe, and surrounded by the wufu and Buddhist and Daoist emblems amidst further lingzhi-shaped clouds reserved against a diaper ground, with some details in Peking knot, all in shades of blue, green, purple, red, pink, white and pale coral, and couched gold thread, within an outer border of shou characters and bats in three tones of gold; 11 7/8 x 12 3/8 in. (30.2 x 31.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $8,000 – $12,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Pair of Embroidered Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Paradise Flycatchers, Buzi. 19th Century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the ninth rank and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the white, long-tailed bird (lanque) shown facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from waves above a broad gold stripe, and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) and the wufu amidst lingzhi-shaped clouds, within a border of flower scroll, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, white, green and yellow, and outlined in couched gold thread; 11 3/8 x 11 5/8 in. (29 x 29.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $8,000 – $12,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.an_embroidered_civil_officials_rank_badge_of_a_golden_pheasant_buzi_19_d5477062h

An Embroidered Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Golden Pheasant, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the second rank, worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the long-tailed, multi-colored bird (jinji) shown facing the sun while standing on a rock emerging from rolling waves above a two-color gold lishui stripe and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) and the wufu amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, green, pale coral, yellow, white, black and magenta, within a flower scroll border; 11 5/8 in. x 12 cm. (29.5 and 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $6,000 – $10,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 An Embroidered Satin Xiezhi Rank Badge, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a censor, and finely worked in satin stitch and Peking knot with a mythical beast (xiezhi) with white body and greenish mane shown looking up at the sun while standing atop wind-tossed rolling waves interspersed with ‘precious objects,’ with rocks at either side and surrounded by lotus scroll and lingzhi-shaped clouds repeated below the waves, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, yellow and white, and couched gold thread within a border of bats and shou characters; 11 x 11¾ in. (28 x 29.8 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $6,000 – $10,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Pair of Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Quail, Buzi. 19th Century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the eighth rank and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the bird (anchun) with mustard-yellow body shown facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from a band of rolling waves, clouds and a multicolored lishui stripe, flanked by peaches to one side and peony to the other and surrounded by Buddhist emblems and the wufu amidst ruyi-shaped clouds reserved on a ground of dense gold scrollwork, all picked out in shades of blue, mustard yellow, green, white, purple and pale peach, within an outer border of flower scroll alternating with Daoist emblems, ‘precious objects’ and bats at the corners; 11 7/8 x 11¾ in. (30.2 x 29.9 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $6,000 – $8,000

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 A Pair Of Kesi Civil Official’s Rank Badges of a Goose, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the fourth rank, the bird (yunyan) facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with the bajixiang above a lishui stripe, flanked by flowers issuing from rocks and surrounded by four Daoist emblems and three of the wufu while the other two are in the upper border of ruyi-shaped clouds, all reserved on a ground of gold wan diaper and picked out in subtle shades of blue, white, yellow, and coral, with painted black details, within a border of conjoined wan characters; 11½ x 12¼ in. (29.2 x 31 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Jacqueline Simcox, London.

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An Embroidered Satin Xiezhi Rank Badge, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a censor and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread with a mythical beast (xiezhi) with white body, single horn, and green mane and bushy tail, looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves above a lishui stripe, surrounded by the wufu and Buddhist emblems amidst clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, white, coral and purple, within a border of lotus scroll; 12¼ x 12 in. (31 x 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Notes: Worn as the rank insignia of government censors, whose duties required them to root out corruption, the xiezhi served as a symbol of imperial justice.

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 An Embroidered Satin Circular Woman’s Rank Badge of a Crane. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for the wife of a civil official of the first rank, finely worked in fine couched gold and silver thread and satin stitch with the crane (xianhe) facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ above a gold and silver lishui stripe, flanked by flowers and lingzhi growing from rocks and surrounded by Daoist emblems and the wufu suspending ribbon-tied wan emblems amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, the crane’s poll and the sun stitched with coral-colored beads and the beak and legs in pale blue-green thread, with further details in white and magenta, all within a border of bats alternating with shou characters; 12 in. (30.5 cm.) diam., mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

an_embroidered_military_officials_rank_badge_of_a_lion_buzi_19th_centu_d5477072h

 An Embroidered Military Official’s Rank Badge of a Lion, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a second rank military official, the gold-couched lion (shizi) shown looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves interspersed with ‘precious objects’, flanked by flowers and lingzhi growing from further rocks and surrounded by Buddhist and Daoist emblems floating amidst lingzhi-shaped clouds, all in counted stitch in shades of blue, green, coral, green, yellow, purple and white, and three colors of couched gold thread, within a border of shou characters and bats; 13¼ x 13 5/8 in. (33.6 x 34.6 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $4,000 – $6,000

Provenance: Judith Rutherford.

an_embroidered_satin_civil_officials_rank_badge_of_a_peacock_buzi_19th_d5477064h

 An Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Peacock, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank and worked in satin stitch, the peacock (kongque) shown looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from breaking waves tossed with ‘precious objects,’ flanked by flowers and lingzhi sprouting from rocks and surrounded by ruyi-shaped clouds and two bats, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, yellow, white and grey, within a border of couched gold thread key fret; 11½ x 11 5/8 in. (29.2 x 29.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $4,000 – $6,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

an_embroidered_gauze_civil_officials_rank_badge_of_a_goose_buzi_19th_c_d5477070h

 An Embroidered Gauze Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a goose, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the fourth rank and embroidered in brick stitch with the white bird (yunyan) facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from waves above a two-color gold lishui stripe, flanked by flowers and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) arranged amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all in shades of blue, white and black, and outlined in couched gold thread, within a lotus scroll border; 11 5/8 x 12¼ in. (29.5 x 31 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $2,000 – $3,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Literature: V. Garrett, Chinese Dress from the Qing Dynasty to the Present, Tokyo/Vermont/Singapore, 2007, fig. 134, p. 76.

A rare imperial blue-ground kesi surcoat (jiagua); Qing dynasty, 18th-19th century

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A rare imperial blue-ground kesi surcoat (jiagua). Qing dynasty, 18th-19th century. Photo Sotheby’s

 the front-opening surcoat woven on the front and back with eight symmetrically placed dragon medallions, four forefacing and four in profile, each worked in gold-wrapped threads resplendent above cresting waves, encircled by the bajixiang, vaporous clouds and bats, the dragons in profile clutching a flaming pearl, all reserved on a midnight-blue ground above roiling waves with foaming crests interspersed with the bajixiang, centered by the terrestrial diagram, above ruyi-form froth and a narrow lishui band, the short sleeves with striding dragons and a conforming wave hem. Width over sleeves 58 3/4 in., 149.5 cm. Estimate 50,000-70,000 USD

PROVENANCE: Collection of Dr. Harvey J. Howard (1880-1956).

NOTE: Dr. Howard was born in Churchville, New York and did his first rotation in China from 1910-1915 as head of the Opthalmology department at the University Medical School, Canton Christian College. After research at Harvard on a Rockefeller Foundation Scholarship as well as a commission as captain in the US army during WWI, he returned to China for an appointment as Head of Opthalmology at Union Medical College in Peking from 1917-1927 and it was within this period, from 1921-25, that he was the ophthalmologist to the young emperor Pu Yi who honored him with the gift of the robe.

This type of surcoat was most likely worn by an empress or dowager empress over a semi-formal robe. A similar robe with the requisite four full facing and four profile dragons is illustrated by Robert D. Jacobsen, Imperial Silks: Ch’ing Dynasty Textiles in The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, vol. 1, Minneapolis, 2000, pl. 109. See a robe sold at Christie’s, New York, 23rd March 1995, lot 275 and another, although on a black ground, sold 2nd June 1994, lot 187.

A fine Imperial yellow-ground silk Throne Cushion Cover. Qing dynasty, 18th century

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A fine Imperial yellow-ground silk Throne Cushion Cover. Qing dynasty, 18th century. Photo Sotheby’s

finely embroidered in polychrome silks with a central medallion of nine peaches surrounded by cranes in flight amidst wispy two-tone blue clouds, each grasping a bamboo stalk in its beak, the border with rolling and cresting waves centered on pierced rocks and celestial peaks, all on a muted gold ground. Height 50 in., 127 cm; Width 51 in., 129.5 cm. Estimate 70,000-90,000 USD

PROVENANCE: Spink & Son Ltd., London, 1989.

EXHIBITED: Spink & Son Ltd., The Minor Arts of China IV, London, 1989, p. 111, cat. no. 148.

Robe dragon en soie bleu. Chine, fin XIXe siècle.

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Robe dragon en soie bleu. Chine, fin XIXe siècle. photo Joigny Enchères

à décor brodé polychrome et aux fils d’or de dragons pourchassant la perle sacrée parmi les nuages et pivoines, chauves-souris et emblèmes bouddhiques, au-dessus des flots.  (Accidents aux manches). Estimation : 2000/3000€

Chinese Blue Silk Robe, 19th Century

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Chinese Blue Silk Robe, 19th Century. Photo Doyle New York

Embroidered with silver dragons above a lishui stripe amid colored clouds and auspicious symbols, all on a bright blue ground. Height 53 inches. Estimate $1,500-2,000

Robe, Chine, XIXe siècle

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Robe, Chine, XIXe siècle. photo Marc-Arthur Kohn

Broderie de soie et d’or Ko’sseu 134 x 200 cm – Estimation : 20 000 – 25 000 €

Cette robe chinoise est réalisée dans un brocart de soie aux motifs très rares. En effet, chaque motif a un symbolisme particulier: On note tout d’abord la présence du motif « shou », de forme circulaire, qui symbolise la longévité. Le motif « wan » est aussi représenté; il est plus connu sous le nom de « svastika » et signifie la joie, le coeur de Bouddha et le chiffre 10000. Ces deux motifs, disposés sur le dessin général, sont encerclés par cinq chauves-souris qui représentent: -une vie longue -la paix et la santé -la richesse -l’amour de la vertu -une mort naturelle. Cet assemblage de motifs est très rare et, en terme chinois, est appelé: « Wufu peng shou ».

Three Chinese robes, 19th & 20th century

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A Chinese late 19th century embroidered gauze dragon robe. photo Bonhams

Of blue gauze, embroidered in silk with eight dragons amongst clouds and symbols of the Eight Immortals above crashing waves, centre front opening, with a loose belt and a fragment of fabric. (3). Sold for £480

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A Chinese 20th century fur-lined embroidered robe. photo Bonhams
 
Of cream silk satin, embroidered with roundels depicting figures and interspersed with flowers, edged with blue embroidered black silk bands, the sleeves decorated with bands featuring peking knots, lined with white rabbit fur. Sold for £228
 
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A Chinese late 19th century embroidered robe. photo Bonhams
 
Of blue silk damask, embroidered with dragons and cherry blossom, edged with embroidered black bands (damaged). Estimate: £80 – 120Unsold
 
 

Robe en soie tissée (kesi) polychrome. Chine, dynastie Qing, XIXe siècle.

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Robe en soie tissée (kesi) polychrome. Chine, dynastie Qing, XIXe siècle. Photo Tajan

à décor de papillons et fleurs de lotus sur fond jaune d’or. Les manches à décor de papillons et orchidées sur fond crème. Le galon à décor de papillons disposés tête-bêche sur fond vert. La bordure ornée d’échassiers, emblèmes bouddhiques et nuées sur fond crème. La doublure vert bouteille. (Accidents et usures). Haut. 130 cm – Estimation : 3 000 / 5 000 €

Robe en soie bleu nuit. Chine, dynastie Qing, fin du XIXe siècle

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Robe en soie bleu nuit. Chine, dynastie Qing, fin du XIXe siècle. Photo Tajan

brodée de fils dorés, à décor de dragons à cinq griffes poursuivant, parmi des motifs auspicieux et au-dessus de flots tourmentés, la perle enflammée parmi les nuées, la doublure en soie bleue. (Légères usures). Haut. 133 cm – Estimation : 1 200 / 1 800 €

An embroidered brown dragon robe, China, 19th ct

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An embroidered brown  dragon robe, China, 19th ct. Photo Nagel Auktionen

Silk floss and threads worked in satin and knot stitches, couched gold threads, unusual motif of the peaches of longevity in a basket shown prominently on the chest area under the dragon facing front – Repairs; L. 138 cm. Estimate 2000 €

Property from a German private collection

Rare robe d’été en gaze de soie damassée crème, changfu. Chine, XVIIIeme-XIXme siècle

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Rare robe d’été en gaze de soie damassée crème, changfu. Chine,  XVIIIeme-XIXme siècle. Photo Artcurial

De couleur jaune pâle ou crème, la gaze de soie très finement damassée d’un motif répété de rondelles à décor de dragon. Hauteur : 129 cm. (50 ¾ in.). Estimation : 600 / 800 €

A RARE DAMASK-WOVEN SILK GAUZE SUMMER INFORMAL ROBE, CHANGFU, 18TH/19TH CENTURY

Comparer avec une robe en satin jaune pâle tissée de médaillons ronds à décor de dragons, datée fin du 18ème, début du 19ème siècle, illustrée par V .Wilson. CHINEse Dress, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1986, p. 39.

Compare with a robe in pale yellow satin woven with dragon roundels, dated late 18th-early 19th century, illustrated by V .Wilson. CHINEse Dress, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1986, p. 39.
A superb embroidered green-ground silk taoist priest’s robe, China, Qing dynasty. Photo Nagel Auktionen

Of rectangular form with wide sleeves, the skirt plied to three folds at each side. Minor tears to the sleeves, minor losses to gold paper, few couched threads loosened. L. 124 cm – Estimate 50 000 €

Cuffs and collar worked with meticulous knot stitch embroidery showing alternating birds and clouds within lobed panels, the hem showing mythical beasts. Flanking the front opening, we see the White Tiger of the West and the Green Dragon of the East, an ancient pair of protective animals. The main motif is to be seen on the back: an elaborate embroidery of a Daoist diagram incorporating the symbols of the sun (cockerel) and the moon (rabbit), the constellation, the symbolic forms of the three mystical Mountains (penglai, fangzhang and yingzhou) and phoenixes to both lower corners of the square diagram. In addition, symbols of longevity like cranes surround the Sacred Mountain scene. The diagram is set against a fine net of couched gold wrapped threads. The complete embroidery is worked with gold and coloured silk threads in knotstitch and couched techniques, the borders show stripes of couched gold leaved paper. Richly decorated vestments like this priest’s robe were used in preeminent daoist ceremonies. The astral symbols on the Daoist robe stand for the relation between priest and cosmos. Heaven is symbolized by the multi-storey pagode in the roundel

Property from an old European private collection 

Cf. a similar type of robe shown in Little/Eichmann “Taoism and the Arts of China”, Chicago 2000, p. 196 as well as blue-ground silk robe “jiangyi” in rectangular form, which shows identical decoration regarding the main motifs as published Christießs, N.Y., 22.3.2007, Lot 457

Robe impériale Long Pao. Chine, XIXème siècle

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Robe impériale Long Pao. Chine, XIXème siècle. Photo Boisgirard Provence-Côte d’Azur

Robe impériale jaune foncé, couleur réservée aux princes, ornée de neuf dragons à cinq griffes (quatre de face et cinq de profil) pourchassant la perle sacrée au milieu des nuages, montagnes stylisées, vagues et li shui, les bandes diagonales à la base de la robe représentant l’eau des profondeurs.
On remarque aux quatre “angles” de la robe les points cardinaux représentés par des rochers en forme de prisme jaillissant des flots, la symbolique prenant forme lorsque la robe est portée, l’homme devant l’axe du monde.
A cela s’ajoutent des chauve-souris tenant divers objets ou symboles auspicieux (sceptre ruy, svastika, pêche de longévité, rouleau de loi, baies, etc.) ainsi que les douze symboles bouddhiques : Le coq à trois pattes au milieu d’un disque solaire, une constellation de trois étoiles, un lièvre au milieu d’un disque lunaire, deux dragons affrontés, la montagne, l’eau, le feu, le grain de millet, le faisan, la hache sacrificielle, les deux coupes sacrificielles et le symbole Fu.
Le col et les poignets sont décorés de dragons pourchassant la perle sacrée au milieu des flots et nuages sur fond bleu nuit.
Les manches snt damassées de dragons.
Dim : Hauteur 136 cm. Largeur 220 cm. Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Chinese silk embroidered wedding hanging, 19th century

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Chinese silk embroidered wedding hanging, 19th century.  Photo Grogan and Company

59 x 86 inches – Estimate $2,500-3,500

Chinese red satin metallic thread embroidered coverlet, late Qing dynasty.

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Chinese red satin metallic thread embroidered coverlet, late Qing dynasty. Photo Grogan and Company

8 feet 2 inches x 6 feet – Estimate $2,000-5,000

Provenance: Mrs. Hong, Xian Xi Province, China;
Reverend James Joyce, by gift, 1945

Notes: The Reverend James Joyce, a Dominican missionary to China, was given this textile by the Hong Family in 1943 to raise money for their church. Rev. James Joyce spent 20 years in China and was held for 5 years as a political prisoner by the Chinese Red Guard in 1955.
The calligraphic inscription along the top border is purported to read: Congratulations, Mrs. Hong on your 60th birthday. You were born into an esteemed family. Everything that passes is successful and peaceful. God has blessed you with all this. You have helped your husband carry out his duties. Everyone commends and praises you. You are gentle, you are nice, you understand everything. Everyone believes you are a great person. May happiness always be with you. You are now old and live in splendor. Yet in your heart you are sincere and pure. In your daily dealings with family and servants you are firm yet fair. You never accept favors or show favoritism. You know the true path to politeness and kindness. A few have written these things in praise of you. You are resolute and confident in your own independence. In the chaos of excitement you know how to mediate. Others believe that you quietly help and support your husband in his esteemed public life. Not only are you all of these things but you are beautiful and serve as an example to all. Your son is following exactly in your footsteps. He is beyond reproach and knows how to treat all people fairly. He is very successful and intelligent. You are a heroine in the inner circles. Your husband is a hero and you are
gentle, kind and honest. May many generations know of your merits. May you be safe and victorious always.
Honorable wife, today you celebrate an important birthday. we come to your court to pay you tribute. You will certainly have good luck following you always. We are embarrassed to present you with such a humble gift as this as a toast to you.

Chinese Imperial black silk and metallic thread embroisered surcoat

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Chinese Imperial black silk and metallic thread embroisered surcoat. Photo Grogan and Company

with five clawed frontal facing dragons;  Estimate $500-1,000

Chinese Nine Dragons silk embroidered robe, 19th century

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Chinese Nine Dragons silk embroidered robe, 19th century. Photo Grogan and Company

length: 58 inches – Estimate $3,000-5,000

The Asia Artwork Collections Exhibition

011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE ASIA ARTWORK COLLECTIONS EXHIBITIONS

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Head of Manasa, the serpent goddess, Eastern India, Gupta period, early 6th century, Terracotta. Height: 30cm. John Eskenazi Ltd.

LONDON.- Since its inception in 1998, Asian Art in London has become one of the world’s most important focal points for international collectors of Asian art, with its series of specialist gallery exhibitions and vents hosted by leading UK dealers and auction houses. In a new move that further enhances its global appeal, Asian Art in London has for the first time invited overseas specialist dealers to join its ranks for the 2011 event, to be held from 3rd to 12th November.International dealers taking part in Asian Art in London for the first time are: Art of the Past from New York; Alexis Renard and Christophe Hioco both from Paris; Carlo Cristi from Italy; Carlos Cruañas from Barcelona. From the Netherlands dealers welcomed are Dries Blitz, Michael Meijering Art Books and Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art. All international dealers will be taking gallery spaces in central London.

Also new to the event this year and adding a further dimension to the ever-expanding group of participants are several London-based dealers. Modern and contemporary Indian art can be found at Grosvenor Gallery, St. James’s; an exciting Chinese performance art piece will be taking place at Hua Gallery’s Battersea riverside location and Mica Gallery in Sloane Square will show modern Pakistani works.

Recently opened Japanese specialist Rutherston Bandini will present, as part of their exhibition, a delightful ivory netsuke of a Kinko on a carp, c.1780 from the Sheila M. Baker collection. Exquisite oriental carpets and textiles can be found at Zadah Gallery, Marylebone. This brings the total number of participants to 51 expanding the event by over 20% on previous years. A full list of all the participants, their exhibitions and specialities can be found below.

Asian Art in London’s sponsors this year are AFEX (Associated Foreign Exchange Brokers) and Apollo Magazine. The Antiques Trade Gazette also continues its invaluable support of the Asian Art in London Art Award for two- and three-dimensional works of art. The award is judged by an international group of experts, including Sir Michael Butler and the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Indian specialist Rosemary Crill, together with Dr Claire Pollard from the Ashmolean Museum and Dr Wang Tao, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Archaeology at SOAS.

The Asian Art in London Gala Party, to be held on the 8th November at the Victoria and Albert Museum, promises to be a spectacular event. The star prize for a lucky guest will be a fantastic free trip to The St. Regis Bangkok hotel sponsored by the St. Regis Group.

Visitors who come to London during the week have the opportunity to view some of the best Asian art in the world, from Imperial porcelain to contemporary, in gallery selling exhibitions and auctions, together with lectures and symposia by London’s major museums.

Asian Art in London, now in its 14th year, has an established reputation as one of the most important Asian art events on the international art calendar.

 
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An imperial yellow silk cushion of ruyi-head shape embroidered with lotus and peony blossoms on a trellis and leaf-filled ground, China, Qianlong period (1736-95). Height: 33cm. Jacqueline Simcox Ltd
 
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Bi-Folium from a Shanameh Manuscript, Detail. Mughal, ca. 1590-1600. Opaque watercolor and ink heightened with gold on paper. Dimensions: 11 ¾ x 14 ½ inches (29.8 x 36.8 cm). Art of the Past
 
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A Chinese jade carving of a lion dog and cub. Ming Dynasty 17th Century. Length: 5.7cm David Baker Oriental Art
 
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A two-fold paper screen painted in ink and colour on a buff ground with a bijin (beauty) entering a room..Signed: Toyonao hitsu. (Painted by Toyonao). Seal: Toyonao no in. (The seal of Toyonao). Japan 18th century Edo period. Dimensions: H. 65” x W. 71” (164.5cm x 180cm). Gregg Baker Asian Art
 
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Hunting scene (detail). Ink on paper. India, Kotah 19th century. Height: 24 5/8 in (62.5 cm). Width: 35 1/4 in (89.5 cm). Joost van den Bergh Ltd
 
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A pair of Daoguang imperial coral ground bowls 1821-1850. Berwald Oriental Art
 
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Japanese wood portrait sculpture of a Zen monk, 17th century CE. Height: 30 in (76.2 cm). Dries Blitz
 
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A European Private Collection of important jade carvings, including an Imperial pale green jade brushpot, Qianlong mark and period; a rare and large carving of a Buddhist lion, 18th century; and a rare and large carving of a duck and young, 18th century. Estimates ranging from £100,000 – £250,000. Bonhams
 
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A fine single-case lacquer inro. By Shibata Zeshin (1807-1891), Meiji Period.  7.9cm (3 1/8in). Estimate £60,000-80,000. Bonhams
 
Of rectangular form, bearing a dark olive green textured ground, lacquered with ripe chestnuts (kuri) splitting out of their husks, the design continuing on the reverse, where a single chestnut falls beneath a branch of Japanese nutmeg (kaya), in gold, silver and coloured takamakie, the interior of roiro, signed Zeshin; with lacquer hako-netsuke bearing a brown ground and lacquered in gold and shibuichi takamakie with a seated hare among wild flowers, signed Zeshin.
 
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A very fine Imperial white jade ‘Zi Qiang Bu Xi’ seal . Qianlong. Dimensions: 4cm height, 4cm width, 4cm depth. Estimate on Request. Bonhams
 
The square seal surmounted by a superb openwork carving of a five-clawed dragon grasping with his claws onto the seal, his head raised and mouth open revealing the menacing fangs above the flaming pearl of wisdom amidst cloud scrolls, the scales on the writhing body defined by fine incisions, the square seal crisply carved with the characters Zi Qiang Bu Xi (Self-Strengthening Never Ceases), the stone of white tone with minor natural veining.Provenance: a European private collection, purchased by the father of the present owner in the 1960s.

An article by Guo Fuxiang, Researcher, The Palace Museum, Department of Palace History, Beijing, will be featured in the catalogue.

 
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An extremely rare and fine cloisonné enamel model of a traditional go-ban (games board). By Honda Kozaburo of Nagoya, Meiji Period. 23cm x 41cm x 44cm (9in x 16 1/16in x 17 1/8in). It was sold for £216,000 including premium. Bonhams
 
The elegant go floor board is raised on four integral, low bulbous legs and finely worked entirely in silver and gold wire, the four sides alternating between ho-o roundels scattered among kiri-mon interweaved amongst karakusa and confronting butterfly roundels and kiku blossoms among karakusa reserved on a transparent ground flecked with aventurine, the playing surface with the intersecting lined grid finely rendered in gold wire, the underside similarly embellished with stylised foliate motifs on a mustard-yellow ground; the heso signed Dai Nippon Honda sei, with wood storage box.
 
Go (or Wei Qi as it is known in China) is considered by most Oriental game experts to be the world’s greatest strategic skill game, far surpassing Chess in its complexity and scope. Of all the serious board games, go has the fewest rules and yet, the game itself is the most intellectually challenging. The mathematical elegance of the rules is complemented by the great beauty of the board, especially in Japan where it has been elevated to a pinnacle of aesthetic beauty.
 
The exceptionally fine condition and exquisite workmanship of this piece allow us to appreciate the remarkable technique and wide repertoire of the Japanese cloisonné enamel maker’s craft and in particular, the aventurine ground which is specifically referred to by Brinkley in Artistic Japan at Chicago: A Description of Japanese Works of Art Sent to the World’s Fair, Yokohama 1893, as a special characteristic of Honda’s work. The artist’s works are as highly sought after today as they were during his lifetime and extant signed works by Honda, particuarly of this extraordinary quality, are extremely rare.
 
Although go boards of ivory, wood and other materials are in abundant supply, a cloisonné enamel example of this superlative quality, as presented here, is hitherto unrecorded. This would therefore strongly suggest that it was either commissioned directly from the artist by a wealthy industrial family to present as a gift or that it was made for Bankoku Hakurankai (International Exhibition) entry.
 
Compare also with a go-ban which belonged to the Tokugawa Family, lacquered with maki-e patterns of tortoise-shell and aoi-mon crest, illustrated by Colin Mackenzie and Irving Finkel, Asian Games: the Art of Contest, Asia Society 2004, p.208, no.16:7.
 
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A pair of famille verte dishes. 19th or 20th century. Each one of circular form decorated with a pair of Manchu/Chinese ladies beside a child holding a lotus branch. Diameter: 18.50 in (47 cm). Christie’s South Kensington
 
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Marble Fragment. China, Hebei province. 10 x 12 in (25.5 x 30.5 cm). Circa 5th / 6th century with Greek / Roman & central Asian influences. Brandt Asian Art
 
A white carved marble fragment of the lower part of a Buddhist figure. Depicting a pair of legs with bejeweled anklets and flowing overlapping robes, beneath silk tassels. The back, with further naturalistically rendered robes. The details boldly and powerfully designed.
 
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A very rare carved rhinoceros horn ‘hundred boys’ stemcup. 17th century. Height: 3 1/2 in (8.9cm); £300,000-500,000. Important Rhinoceros Horn and Jade Carvings from a Distinguished European Collection Christie’s
 
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A pair of Chinese famille rose tapering vases. China, Yongzheng Period (1723-35). Height: 16.75 (42.55 cm). £15,000-20,000 Christie’s South Kensington
 
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Saraswati. Gilt bronze, Nepal, early 13th century. Height: 17.5cm/7inches. Carlo Cristi
 
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Sakyamuni Buddha. West Tibet/West Nepal. Khasa Malla period. 13th-14th century. Height: 16.5cm. Carlos Cruanas
 
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Huanghuali High Yoke-back Armchair, sichutouguanmaoyi. Late Ming – early Qing period, c. 1600 – 1700. Height: 119.0cm-Depth of seat: 47.5cm- Width of seat: 56.5cm. Eskenazi Ltd
 
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Royal Mandala. Cambodia, Angkor Empire. Angkor Wat, mid 12th century. Bronze. Height 34 cm; diameter 28 cm. John Eskenazi Ltd
 
This bronze mandala presented by John Eskenazi Ltd is an enigmatic work of art.  A group of eight identical figures, seated on a round platform surround a similar, larger individual elevated on a lotus plinth.  Dating from a period of Southeast Asian history when political and religious responsibility were intrinsically joined, the iconography of this mandala cannot be easily ascribed to any known Hindu or Buddhist belief known to have existed within the court of Angkor.  More likely, it represents royal authority, delegated to the principal officers of state, who were bound by oath of loyalty to the service of the king.
 
A mandala is visualised by throwing a rounded pebble into a pool of still water.  The greatest surface effect is witnessed in the centre, with gradually lessening ripples of water emanating outwards.  The visual image of the pebble hitting the water represents a cosmic idea that is deep rooted in South and Southeast Asian sensibility, pervading all aspects of religion and statecraft, as well as architecture, domestic life and every level of human self-awareness.  Be it god, ruler or subject, the individual or landmark at the centre of the mandala is the source of energy whose influence radiates outwards, gradually diminishing in strength, the further it extends.  In a mandala such as this exquisitely carved bronze, the purpose of the surrounding figures is to extend the central source of energy or influence further.  In some mandalas, they face inwards, as if participating in some ritual.  In others, such as this fine and important example, the figures face outwards, poised and ready to disseminate whatever message the central figure wishes to express, beyond the platform on which they sit to the profane or outer realm outside. The central figure holds a lotus in one hand, identifying his spiritual status, which in this instance is that of chakravartin rather than god.  The eight figures around him each hold a lotus between their two hands, which are raised in namaskaramudra (respectful greeting) as they pay their respect to the central figure and convey his goodwill to the outside world. 
 
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An 18th Century lacquer writing box after Ogata Korin, the domed cover worked in gold and coloured taka-maki-e and inlaid in mother-of-pearl and pewter, with stylised hydrangeas and hibiscus, the interior of the cover decorated with plum blossom and rocks, the interior of the base with stylised rippling water, containing the original writing implements of two brushes and a knife. Length 25.5cm., width 23.2cm., height 10.2cm. Malcolm Fairley Ltd
 
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Selection of Scholar’s objects on a scroll form stand.Fleurdelys Antiquités
 
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Four Ladies in a Palace Courtyard. Family of Nainsukh. Guler or Kangra, India, c.1780-1785. 8.35 x 6.3 in (21.2 x 16 cm). Sam Fogg
 
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Jamini Roy (1887-1972), Three Women. Gouache on paper, 30.3 x 11.81 in (77 x 40 cm). Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd

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Hunting Party. Amber artist in Mughal style, late 17th century. Francesca Galloway

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A pair of ‘famille-rose’ ‘soldier’ vases and covers. Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period (1722-35). Height 138cm. Provenance: A Spanish noble family. Gibson Antiques Ltd
 
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Qin Feng, West Wind East Water 078, 2005. Ink, coffee and tea on  silk-and-cotton paper; 51.25 x 37 in (130.2 x 94 cm). Michael Goedhuis
 
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Francis Newton Souza (1924-2002), Temple Dancer. Oil on board, 48 x 24 in (121.9 x 61 cm). Signed and dated top right. Grosvenor Gallery
 
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Shiva Bhiksatana. Steatite. India, Karnataka region. Late 11th century. Height: 82 cm. Provenance: Private collection, Spain. Christophe Hioco
 
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Untitled, 2009, Han Zhongren. Oil on canvas, 110cm x 110cm. Hua Gallery
 
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Chenxiangmu (aloes wood) libation cup. China, Kangxi period, 1662 – 1722. Height: 4 inches, 10.1 cm. Width: 3 3/4 inches, 9.5 cm. Ben Janssens Oriental Art Ltd
 
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An archaic bronze food vessel (yu). Chinese, late Shang-Western Zhou dynasty. Diameter: 10inches, 25.4cm. Roger Keverne Ltd
 
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A yellow jade snuff bottle, 1720 – 1780. Height: 5.5cm. Robert Kleiner & Co. Ltd
 
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Krishna Venugopala. Orissa circa 16th/17th century. Height: 7 3/4in (19.7cm). Jeremy Knowles
 
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Imperial semi egg-shell wine cup, period of Kangxi, with hundred butterfly decoration. Marchant
 
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Allah Teardrop. Swarovski crystal on slate. Dimensions: height 100cm, width 80cm. Mica Gallery Ltd
 
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Qajar tile, Iran 2nd half 19th century. Moulded and painted in cobalt blue, turquoise, manganese and black with a trellis pattern filled with composite flower heads. 31cm wide, 33.5cm high. Amir Mohtashemi Ltd
 
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An ivory netsuke of a recumbent boar by Masanao of Kyoto, its front legs resting on a branch of oak or chestnut leaves.  It boasts an exaggerated snout reminiscent of a baku.  The small lively eyes are of inlaid red buffalo horn. Signed in an oval reserve beneath the right haunch: Masanao. Kyoto, circa 1760. Length: 2 1/4 in (5.7 cm). Sydney L. Moss Ltd
 
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A pair of ear plugs. Assam, 19th Century. Height: 3.5cm. Susan Ollemans
 
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Fine Japanese silver and multimetal koro (incense burner) in the form of a hawk, mounted on a lacquer stand. Signed Tomonobu, 1898. Kevin Page Oriental Art Ltd
 
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Document Box by Murayama Hisashi. Showa period, 1943. Gold, silver & coloured makie; 38.3 x 17.8 x 10.5 cm. Simon Pilling: East Asian Art & Interiors
 
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A late Ming Fahua porcelain figure of Guanyin seated with two acolytes. Wanli period, late 16th century. Height: 8 in (20 cm). Nicholas Pitcher Oriental Art Ltd
 
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An early Yaozhou pierced cupstand. Northern Song dynasty, 11th century. Diameter: 5 3/4 in (14.5cm).  Priestley & Ferraro
 
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Jade Ram’s Hilt Dagger (Khanjar). India (Mughal), circa 1650. Length of dagger: 32.6 cm. Length of hilt: 11.7 cm. Simon Ray Indian & Islamic Works of Art
 
A magnificent carved jade ram’s head dagger, the tapering watered steel single-edged blade with a gold damascened chape and cusped cartouches issuing down each side of the blade and filled with scrolling vine, the grey jade hilt with slightly flattened spine terminating in a fine and realistically rendered ram’s head with features elegantly carved, the eyes inset with small rubies within gold mounts and the base lightly shaped for the fingers.
 
According to Stuart Cary Welch, a close look at the paintings of the  Padshahnama reveals that the most common form of dagger worn during the reign of Shah Jahan (1627-1658) was the katar (thrust or push-dagger), followed closely by the khanjar.  Of the khanjars depicted in the manuscript however, there are only very few examples with animal-head hilts and these are reserved for princes.
 
Provenance: The Collection of the Late Hon. Mrs Marten, O.B.E., D.L,
Crichel House, Wimborne, Dorset, acquired in the 1950s
 
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Safavid tile. Ceramic decorated in cuerda seca. Iran, XVIIth century; (22 x23 cm). Alexis Renard
 
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Manjushri-Yamantaka. Tibet, c. 1000 AD. Copper alloy with gilding and pigment; 37 cm (14½ in). Rossi & Rossi Ltd
 
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A crimson-pink chrysanthemum dish, Qianlong mark and period, from a private collection of monochrome porcelains. Sotheby’s
 
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‘Life of Buddha’ stone frieze, Pala, 10th century, India – height: 73 cm. A&J Speelman Ltd
 
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4 Chinese Export Silver Mug. S&J Stodel
 
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A box for tea ceremony utensils. Signed Shotei (Moriya Shotei). Circa 1910 ; 15.5 x 18 x 18 cm. Grace Tsumugi Fine Art Ltd
 
A very fine chabako, decorated with a black horse amongst ominaeshi (autumn plant with fine yellow flowers) and susuki (silver grasses) worked in black, red and gold lacquer on a red lacquer ground with dew drops in silver studs. The corners worked in gold lacquer with stylized scrolling motif on a black lacquer ground. Each side of the box with a pierced and shaped window, above a saddle shape black lacquer panel with further autumn grasses and silver studs. The interior of rich gyobu (lacquer with very high content of gold leaf). 
 
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Bronze Kneeling Monk. Burma, Mandalay Period, 19th Century H. 49cms, 19½ins. Jonathan Tucker Antonia Tozer Asian Art
 
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Blue and White Temple Vase . Height: 82 cm. China, Jiajing period (1522-1566). Price on request. Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art
 
The vase is decorated around the neck with Tibetan Sanskrit characters in a calligraphic Chinese style. The central character, placed below three smaller characters, is a mantra -a sound chanted to promote concentration- pronounced as a Buddhist invocation ‘Om’. the most famous mantra in Tibetan Buddhism, Om Mani Padme Hum, invokes the goddes Mahavidya. the shape and decoration on this vase suggest that it was made for ritual use.
 
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A Rare Blue and White Apothecary Jar. Late Ming Dynasty. Chinese porcelain decorated in underglaze cobalt blue. Height: 16cm; Diameter: 9cm. Jorge Welsh Oriental Porcelain and Works of Art
 
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A fine and large pair of Chinese Imperial cloisonné enamel and gilt bronze huluping or gourd-shaped vases. Qing dynasty, each with a six character Qianlong seal mark and of the period 1736-95, 47.2cm. From the collection of HRH Prince Arthur, 1st Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (1850-1942) and his daughter, Lady Patricia Ramsey (1886-1974).  Est: £100,000 – 200,000.  Woolley & Wallis
 
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Ottoman Embroidery, from the Greek mainland, c1700. 210 x 126cm. Zadah
 
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Japanese Kesi Tapestry. 193 x 131cmZadah
 
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Chinese, Ningia rug fragment, 17th Century. Zadah
 
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The Slaying of the Demon Nisumbha. Pahari, by an artist of the first generation after Nainsukh, 1790-1800; 16.4 x 25.9 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper
 
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Capricorn. Mughal, c.1580–85. Folio  26.8 x 22 cm; painting: 23.5 x 18.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper..
 
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Timur Outside the Fortress of Qarshi. Mughal, 1595–1600. Folio: 28 x 20.3 cm; painting 13.5 x 10.3 cm. Opaque watercolour, ink and gold on paper
 
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Krishna is sanctified by vedicrites. Krishna is sanctified by vedicrites. 17.9 x 23.6 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
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Nawab ‘Alivardi Khan with his nephew Saulat Jang. Murshidabad or Patna, c. 1765. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
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Portrait of a Mughal Princess. Mughal, 1650–75. Opaque watercolour on paper heightened with gold, in a buff album page with regular rows of large gold flowers; a calligraphic specimen is on the reverse.
 
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Hindola Raga. Hyderabad, c. 1760. Folio: 39.2 x 25.1 cm; painting: 24.2 x 15.1 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold and silver on paper
 
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Portrait of the Emperor Farrukh Siyyar. Mughal, 1713-1719. Album page:48 x 32.5; painting: 28 x 21 cm; Opaque watercolour, gold and silver on paper, mounted on an early 19th century album page
 
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Baby Krishna upsets the cart .India, by a Bikaner artist, 1690-1700. Painting : 22.7 x 31.2 cm ; Folio: 30.8 x 38.2 cm. Opaque watercolour and gold on paper
 
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The Goddess Resplendent. folio: 25.4 x 18.5 cm; painting: 19 x 12.8 cm.. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper
 
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Lady holding a wine cup. Mughal, c.1650–60. Folio: 25.5 x 18 cm; painting:13.65 x 8.7 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper heightened with gold, in a buff album page with large gold flowers
 
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The Chinese Hwamei perched on a Bridelia: from the Impey album. Company School, Calcutta, painted by Zain ad-Din for Lady Impey and dated 1780. Painting: 80.5 x 59 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper
 
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Mughal Hunting scene: from the Amber Album. By an artist at Amber painting in Mughal style, late 17th century. Folio: 42.4 x 27 cm; miniature: 36 x 24.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
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RADHA AND KRISHNA SHELTER UNDER A PARASOL. Attributed to the Purkhu family workshop, Kangra, c. 1825; 30 x 26.7 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
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Krishna Hunting Black Buck. Bundi, c. 1770-75. Folio: 31.5 x 25 cm; painting: 24 x 19.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper
 
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South Indian Tambura. South India, possibly Tanjore, 19th century. Length: 72 cm; width: 26 cm; depth: 18.5 cm. Rosewood, ivory, lac and gilded brass metalwork mounts

Brahma. Grès rose. Inde Poignards rituel «Phurbu», Couperet «kartrika», Trompe d’appel «kang-gling» & Coupe crânienne «Kapala” ,Tibet, XVIIIe & XXe s.,

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Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet, XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

au manche composé d’une vajra, de trois visages de Mahakala surmonté d’une demi-vajra, la lame sort de la gueule d’un monstre mythique « makara » En fer et bronze doré.L: 27 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

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Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet,  XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

à l’extrémité du manche figure trois visages de Mahakala, la lame sort de la gueule de « Makara » En fer et bronze doré. . L: 175 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

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Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet, XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

au manche composé d’une vajra, de trois visages de Mahakala surmonté d’une tête de cheval, la lame ornée de deux serpents sortant de la gueule d’un oiseau En argent. L: 145 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

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Couperet « kartrika », Tibet, XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

la lame semi-circulaire en fer, et sommet du manche en forme de demi-vajra H: 15 cm – Estimation : 1 700 – 1 900 €

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Trompe d’appel « kang-gling » . Tibet, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

à décor floral et de deux dragons. En os et cuivre doré, avec incrustation de turquoise et corail. L: 335 cm

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Coupe crânienne « Kapala » avec couvercle sur un support triangulaire. Os et cuivre. Tibet, XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

H: 20 cm L: 17 cm – Estimation : 1 000 – 1 200 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 16 mai à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 6 9, rue Drouot 75009 PARIS. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

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Tiare de lama. Tissu, turquoise et pierres. Ladakh, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

Estimation : 1 300 – 1 500 €

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Chapeau de lama. Tissu, turquoise, corail et ambre. Ladakh, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

Estimation : 1 300 – 1 500 €

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Bracelet se terminant par deux têtes de dragon, aux yeux incrustés de turquoise. XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

En métal argentifère.  L: 85 cm – Estimation : 900 – 1 000 € 

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Parure pectorale ornée de cabochons, de perles de corail et de turquoise. Ladakh, début du XXe s  Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

L: 20 cm – Estimation : 250 – 350 €

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Briquet. Tibet, XIXe s.

composé d’un cercle de fer et d’une bourse en cuir enluminé de métaux repoussé serti de turquoise et corail, servant à contenir le silex et l’étoupe.  L: 7 x 125 cm – Estimation : 150 – 180 €

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Bourse en cuir, métal, corail et turquoise. Tibet, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

L: 8 x 12 cm – Estimation : 120 – 150 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 16 mai à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 6 9, rue Drouot 75009 PARIS. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

Miroir circulaire décor de cercles concentriques. Khmer. Cambodge. 12ème-13ème siècle.

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Miroir circulaire décor de cercles concentriques. Khmer. Cambodge. 12ème-13ème siècle. photo Chevau-Légers Enchères

Bronze argentifère à patine de fouille. Diam 12,5cm – Estimation : 600 / 800 €

Chevau-Légers Enchères – Gilles CHAUSSELAT – 78000 Versailles. Vente aux enchères du Dimanche 17 avril 2011. Hôtel des Chevau-Légers – 3, impasse des Chevau-Légers. Tel: 01 39 50 58 08.

Bejeweled Indian “Pearl Canopy of Baroda” to Be Auctioned at Sotheby’s in New York

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The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24 (detail). Photo: Sotheby’s.

NEW YORK (REUTERS).- A stunning, rarely seen bejeweled, nearly 150-year-old canopy from India is expected to sell for as much as $5 million when it is auctioned next month, according to Sotheby’s.

The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24 as part of a larger auction of Indian and Southeast Asian Works of Art in New York.

It includes over 500,000 pearls, as well as numerous diamonds, sapphires, rubies and emeralds sewn on silk. Floral “Persian-style” vines made with colored beads circle the canopy.

“The Maharaja was a great patron of the arts,” said Mary Jo Otsea, the worldwide director of Sotheby’s carpet department. “This piece is a continuation of the golden age of Indian art from the Mughal period, with Persian influences.”

The canopy dates from around 1865, when it was commissioned by the Maharaja of Baroda, in the present-day Indian state of Gujarat. It is believed that the piece was intended to be donated as a gift to decorate the tomb of the Prophet Mohammed in Medina, in what is now Saudi Arabia.

The man who commissioned the canopy, Maharaja Khande Rao Gaekwar, was known to be particularly fond of jewels. In 1867, he bought the “Star of the South”, one of the largest diamonds in the world.

The canopy is part of a set which included four large rectangular jewel-encrusted carpets, of which only one remains. One of the rectangular carpets was sold at an auction in Doha, Qatar in March 2009 for $5.4 million.

Art historians are still unsure exactly how the carpet and the canopy were arranged together, Otsea said.

“One possibility is this, that four pillars held the canopy over the carpet,” Otsea explained. “Another is that it was somehow placed on a camel. But nobody knows, and the Maharajah died a long time ago.”

The canopy had not been seen for more than 100 years until it was included in an exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London last year.

At the time the canopy was created the nominally sovereign state of Baroda was among the most prosperous in British India, with much of its income coming from cotton, rice and sugar.

Baroda state, which was founded in 1721, existed until it was incorporated into newly independent India in 1947.

“All the states of the time were under the Indian Raj. They were titular heads who led the people, and were free to appoint courts and commission workshops,” Otsea said. “This Maharaja, from what I understand, got on very well with the British.”

Otsea said the canopy is notable, even among the other luxurious works of art commissioned by regional rulers in Baroda and across British India.

“The Maharaja liked jewels, and it was very much a status symbol and showed wealth,” she said. “But this is really something special.”  (Reporting by Bernd Debusmann Jr., editing by Patricia Reaney)

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The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24. Photo: Sotheby’s.

Bronzes du Bayon, XIIe-XIVe siècle

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Miroir. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

D : 17 cm – Estimation : 720 – 750 €

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Paire de bracelets. En bronze. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 7 cm D : 7.5 cm – Estimation : 600 – 700 €

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Bracelet en bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s.  Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

L : 15 cm D : 7 cm – Estimation : 600 – 700 €

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Bol à la panse lotiforme. En bronze. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

 (Manques). H : 13 cm D : 13 cm – Estimation : 300 – 350 €

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Miroir. En bronze. Cambodge, Bayon, XIIIe – XIVe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

D : 19 cm – Estimation : 200 – 250 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

L : 5,5 x 4,5 cm

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 10 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 12.5 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 14.5 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 14 mars à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 2. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

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Ambikâ. Inde, Rajasthan, XIIe siècle © BRAFA 2010

Marbre blanc. H 96 cm – Prix sur demande.

Dans l’iconographie hindoue, elle est considérée comme la « Grande déesse », symbolise l’énergie cosmique et combat les forces des ténèbres. Ici elle est représentée debout avec un déhanché ondulant en triple flexion, le tribhanga, qui accentue les formes de la taille et des cuisses.
Elle tient dans son bras gauche un enfant qui s’appuie sur sa hanche ; son autre main, fracturée à ce jour, devait contenir une branche de manguier. Le halo est orné d’un décor floral et sa coiffure très sophistiquée se compose de rangs perlés et de pierres précieuses qui recouvrent sa chevelure. Son visage est caractérisé par une forme ronde, une bouche charnelle, des yeux en amande et une arcade sourcilière bien définie. Richement parée, elle porte de merveilleux éléments de parure. Les canons de beauté indiens associés aux formes pleines et sensuelles sont parfaitement mis en valeur sur cette sculpture. Par son aspect bienveillant la sculpture, cette représentation serait plutôt jaïne qu’hindoue.

Provenance : collection privée, Asie

Ambika. Marble. H 96 cm. India, Rajasthan, 12th century
Ambika, who in Hindu iconography is considered to be the ‘Great Goddess’, symbolizes cosmic energy and fights the forces of darkness. Here she is portrayed in a curving triple-bend stance, the tribhanga, which accentuates the waist and thighs. With her left arm she holds a child on her hip. Her other hand, which is broken off, probably held a mango tree branch. On her halo is a floral design and her highly sophisticated hairdo includes pearls and precious gems. Her face is round, with full lips, almond-shaped eyes and well-defined eyebrows. Her jewelry is rich. All the precepts of Indian beauty are perfectly present in this sculpture. Probably Jain rather than Hindu
Provenance: Asian private collection

0_Après une carrière internationale au sein de la banque JP Morgan, Christophe Hioco s’est consacré, il y a maintenant huit ans, à sa passion de toujours: l’art asiatique. La galerie est spécialisée dans l’art ancien du Vietnam, avec notamment des bronzes de la culture de Dông Son, dans l’art bouddhique d’Asie du sud-est, l’art indien et l’archéologie chinoise. Faisant preuve d’une exigence à la fois artistique, émotionnelle et esthétique dans le choix de ses œuvres, Christophe Hioco accorde la plus grande importance à la provenance et à la qualité des pièces. Christophe Hioco participe à la Brussels Oriental Art Fair depuis 2007 et à la Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair (BRAFA) depuis 2009.

Christophe Hioco @ BRAFA (Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair), Stand N°124. 21-30 january 2011

by appointment. Paris, France. T +33 (0)1 53 30 09 65 – M +32 (0)470 59 48 32 – M +33 (0)6 64 98 65 50 – F +33 (0)1 72 70 33 28 – www.galeriehioco.cominfo@galeriehioco.com

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Petit cabinet indo-portugais. Influence Mughal, XVIe-XVIIe siècle © BRAFA 2010

Teck, ébène, ivoire et montures en cuivre doré. H 15 x L 22 x P 17,2 cm

01L’offre de la galerie AR-PAB est très large allant de l’argenterie, du mobilier, de la sculpture, des objets de curiosité, des ivoires, des bijoux, des instruments scientifiques, à l’art colonial portugais et sud-américain, de la Renaissance au XIXe siècle. Chaque pièce est sélectionnée pour sa rareté, son authenticité et son état de conservation. Tout objet a une histoire, tout objet a une âme et dans chacun d’eux on retrouve un peu de l’histoire des arts decoratifs.

AR-PABBRAFA(Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair), Stand N°:   61

Alvaro Roquette & Pedro Aguiar Branco, Rua D. Pedro V, 69. P-1250-094 Lisbonne, Portugal. T +35 1 21 34 21 682 – M +35 1 96 74 23 311 – M +35 1 93 24 16 590 – F +35 1 22 55 08 154- www.ar-pab.com - pab@pab.pt

Courtauld Conservation Experts Undertake New Research of Wall Paintings in Bhutan

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Late 17th-century painting in the Gyalsey zimchung, a private room in Tango monastery © The Courtauld Institute of Art.

LONDON.- The small and stunningly beautiful Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan has for many years intrigued the West, not least on account of its geographic isolation, its hermetic reputation, and its distinct and perfectly preserved culture. The core of Bhutan’s identity is its Tibetan Buddhist heritage which, uniquely in the modern world, remains as rich and vital as it ever has been. In over two thousand thriving temples and monasteries scattered across its rugged terrain, spectacular wall paintings testify to the strength of its cultural and artistic traditions.

Many of these sites are remote and their paintings have never before been recorded. During the last three years, experts from The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, have been given unique access by the Government of Bhutan to undertake scientific research of the kingdom’s wall paintings.

Prior to the 17th century, Bhutan was indivisibly part of the Buddhist kingdom of Tibet. Its emergence as a separate state occurred under the revered leadership of Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyel (1594-1651), himself a religious exile from Tibet. Although Tibetan Buddhism had been well established since the 7th century, the Zhabdrung unified his new country by promoting the Drukpa Kagyu school as the state religion, though other traditions such as the Nyingma also flourished. These traditions are renowned for the meditative practices of their spiritual leaders, whose distinctive lineages are portrayed in Bhutanese wall paintings alongside more traditional Buddhist iconography.

To consolidate both his temporal and religious power, the Zhabdrung also built a series of Tibetan-style fortresses, known as dzongs, at strategic locations across Bhutan. These combined administrative and monastic institutions in a system of regional governance that survives to this day. The dzongs still accommodate communities of hundreds of monks, whose religious life revolves around the many temples (lhakhangs) built within their fortified walls. Usually, each of these temples is adorned with wall painting.

Today, these paintings are vulnerable to a range of threats. The traditional buildings in which they survive are often damaged – and sometimes completely destroyed – by catastrophic fires or floods. In a harsh natural environment, gradual deterioration also takes its toll on the susceptible materials that constitute the paintings. Although continuous religious use has helped to preserve many temples and monasteries, there have been detrimental consequences too: in attempts to renew religious interiors, historic paintings have suffered from modern repainting or have been replaced with paintings on canvas.

The Department of Culture, within the Ministry of Home and Cultural Affairs of Bhutan, is now taking steps to address these problems. Efforts include the current three-year research project with the Courtauld Institute. Following an exploratory visit in 2006 by Professor David Park, Director of the Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department, it was decided that there was an outstanding need to investigate the materials and techniques of Bhutanese wall paintings. An understanding of how the paintings were made leads to an understanding of how they deteriorate and, ultimately, how they can be best preserved. The main purpose of the research is therefore to benefit the Department of Culture in undertaking any conservation of wall paintings in future.

The fieldwork has been carried out by wall painting conservators Lisa Shekede and Stephen Rickerby of the Courtauld Institute, in collaboration with staff from the Department of Culture of Bhutan. The first major phase took place in 2008, and two subsequent phases were completed in 2009 and 2010. Scores of temples and other religious sites were visited throughout the kingdom, to record their paintings and to collect small paint samples for subsequent analysis in London. This is the first time such a wide-ranging scientific study of painting has been undertaken in Bhutan, and findings have proved to be exciting.

Previously scant knowledge of the original materials and techniques of Bhutanese wall painting, and of their historical and stylistic development, has been much enhanced. Although relatively few paintings survive from before the 17th century, the study included unprecedented investigation and analysis of a rare early 16th-century scheme in central Bhutan. Other important paintings examined are those that survive from the period when the Zhabdrung and his successors established their control over the country. Under their patronage, a courtly style of painting emerged, characterized by its remarkable sophistication. In these paintings, expensive pigments, delicate organic colourants and glazes, and skillfully applied discriminating coatings have been found.

This technical complexity has not been previously recognized and it puts many Bhutanese wall paintings at a variety of new risks. The vulnerability of barely visible materials such as deteriorated organic glazes means that they can be all too easily lost in cleaning if their presence is not recognized. The degradation of original materials, such as the discolouration of original varnishes, can also be mistaken as something that should be removed rather than preserved. With ever-growing Western interest in Tibetan Buddhism – and the resources that this attracts – an alarming number of Buddhist wall paintings in India and Tibet have been irreversibly damaged by well-meaning but disastrous cleaning. Bhutan’s isolationist past protected its cultural heritage from such dangers, but the opening up of the country in recent years means that such risks cannot now be ignored.

The Courtauld’s research project is therefore a timely one and its findings have far reaching conservation implications. It is intended that the wealth of technical and other information to have emerged from the study will be used as a foundation for future conservation efforts, based on recognition of the value and vulnerability of the kingdom’s remarkable wall painting heritage.

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Detail of 17th-century painting in the Lama Lhakhang in Trongsa Dzong © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Asian Art Museum Foundation Announces Proposal to Restructure Foundation’s Debt

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Kris hilt depicting a demonic figure, perhaps 1700–1800. Ivory. H: 5¼ in; D: 1¾ in. Asian Art Museum

SAN FRANCISCO, CA.- Mayor Gavin Newsom, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, City Controller Ben Rosenfield, Board of Supervisors President David Chiu and the Asian Art Museum Foundation, the private fundraising arm of the Asian Art Museum, today announced a proposal to restructure the Foundation’s $120 million bond debt. The five-party proposed agreement, coordinated by City Attorney Herrera, City Controller Ben Rosenfield, and City Public Finance Director Nadia Sesay with participation from the Foundation and its creditors, JP Morgan Chase and MBIA, Inc., provides long term stable financing to the Foundation, allowing the organization to continue to raise the funds necessary to support the Museum’s dynamic range of exhibitions and programs. The proposal will now be submitted to the Board of Supervisors, Asian Art Commission and Asian Art Museum Foundation for their consideration.

“Over the years, millions of people have experienced the Asian Art Museum’s famous collection—truly one of the City’s most valuable assets—as well as the rich array of public programs for all ages, including generations of school children,” said Mayor Newsom. “The City’s proposal for strengthening the Foundation’s financial position will make sure these efforts carry on for future generations.”

“This is a smart, carefully crafted agreement that both solves the immediate financial crisis facing the Asian Art Museum and helps guard against similar difficulties in the future,”said City Attorney Herrera. “This problem-solving effort took a great deal of creativity and hard work, and I’m especially grateful to Mayor Newsom, City Controller Rosenfield, and the museum’s management. Work outs are not easy or pleasant. I ’m also appreciative to JPMorgan Chase and MBIA for their cooperative approach here in recognizing the need to make concessions and hammering out an appropriately balanced deal. The Asian Art Museum is a world-class cultural treasure, and it deserves the enthusiastic support from City leaders and art lovers throughout the region.”

“The history and legacy that the Asian Art Museum represents will continue to be a cultural icon for many visitors around the world for many years to come because of the steps that we are taking today,”said Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, who will sponsor the legislation and shepherd it through the Board of Supervisors.

Home to a world-renowned collection of more than 17,000 artworks spanning 6,000 years, the Asian Art Museum is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art. The Museum is governed by a public/private partnership with the Asian Art Museum Foundation serving as the organization’s private fundraising arm. To complete the construction of the Museum’s Civic Center home in the early 2000s, the Foundation adopted a common funding model: to raise funds via capital campaign, then issue bonds against the campaign commitments to finance the construction.

More recently, the Asian Art Museum Foundation found itself in technical default of bond covenants and facing the expiration of a letter of credit required to sustain the former financing arrangement. Bond rating agencies expressed concern about the Foundation’s ability to repay the bonds.

“The Asian Art Museum Foundation’s investments and debts—like many nonprofits—have been rocked in recent years by the effects of the global financial crisis,” said City Controller Ben Rosenfield. “The proposal we’ve collaboratively crafted allows the Foundation to regain its financial stability so that it can continue to generate much-needed financial support to the Museum.”

First, there is a restructuring of the rate and term of the Foundation’s bonds. JPMorgan Chase will extend a loan at a low fixed-rate of 4.60% to replace the existing variable rate bonds. Also, the term of the bonds is extended to 30 years (versus current 23 years), and a portion of the principal on the new bonds is deferred in the first two years to allow “breathing room” while the Foundation is restored to full financial health.

A second component of the proposal includes a reduction in the total loan principal and a return of funds to the Foundation. In addition to the benefits from the restructured bond’s rate and term, the Foundation receives upfront cash concessions of $21 million, thereby reducing the outstanding principal amount to $99 million from approximately $120 million, or a reduction of 17%. Also, the current Swap agreement created in 2005 is canceled and the collateral (with a current balance of $13 million) will be returned to Foundation.

The third element requires the Foundation to launch a three-year capital campaign. The first $20 million raised in new unrestricted philanthropic commitments will be required to close the gap (assuming 6.0% return). Funds raised above and beyond this amount could be used to build the museum’s endowment or fund strategic initiatives. Through the leadership of former Mayor Willie Brown, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, Mayor Gavin Newsom and Supervisor Carmen Chu, a committee of civic leaders will be recruited for a capital campaign that will bolster and broaden the Foundation’s fundraising capacity.

“On behalf of the Asian Art Museum Foundation, I express our deep gratitude to Mayor Newsom, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, Controller Ben Rosenfield, and other City officials for their leadership in facilitating a solution toward servicing the Foundation’s debt,” stated Akiko Yamazaki, President of the Asian Art Museum Foundation. “We are now well-positioned to fulfill our role in supporting the Museum’s future endeavors. The Foundation welcomes the leadership of the City in helping us achieve our goals, and we urge the Board of Supervisors to support this proposal.”

Finally, while the Foundation remains primarily responsible for debt and pledges its assets, the City would provide an assurance agreement to replace the current MBIA insurance policy for the debt. Under this proposed agreement, the City will agree to seek funding for the Foundation’s bonds under certain conditions if the Foundation does not have sufficient funds. The proposal also strengthens the working relationship between the City and Foundation to ensure the Foundation’s debt is effectively serviced. For example, the City Controller’s Office will review and offer recommendations to the Foundation’s annual budget.

“As director of the museum, I will continue to work with both City colleagues and Foundation leadership to ensure that the public enjoyment of the museum’s offerings not only continues, but broadens and deepens for years to come,” stated Jay Xu, Director of the Asian Art Museum.

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View of a gallery at the Asian Art Museum.

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Dancing Shiva, Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, 5th/6th century. Terracotta. Height: 25 cm.

NEW YORK, NY.- A wonderful selection of rare and beautiful Asian sculptures will be brought to New York by John Eskenazi for his annual New York exhibition Recent Acquisitions at Adam Williams Fine Art Ltd, from Wednesday 16 to Wednesday 30 March 2011, as part of Asian Art Dealers New York (AADNY) and coinciding with Asia Week. London-based John Eskenazi is one of the world’s most respected dealers in Indian, Gandharan, Himalayan and South-east Asian works of art.

Of particular note is a charming terracotta fragment of Dancing Shiva from 5th/6th century Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, the date corroborated by thermoluminescence analysis. Both joyful and thoughtful, the image is one of the most easily recognised forms in Indian art and in this early example Shiva is two-armed and dances for the delight of his fellow gods. Different ear ornaments identify the god, symbolising the duality of his nature; Shiva contains male and female elements but also embodies the emotional extremes of serenity and anger. The position of Shiva’s arms evokes a sense of energy. Sculpted in high relief, the figure was originally part of a rectangular panel that occupied a ghanadvara (solid aperture) on a temple wall. The Gupta period (4th/6th century AD) has come to be regarded as a cultural Golden Age during which the art of terracotta, once associated with folk imagery, reached its zenith.

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Oil lamp finial in the form of the Kinnara, Central Java. Circa 9th/early 10th century. Bronze. Length: 25 cm

An elegant bronze figure of the half-man/half-bird kinnara once formed the principal element of a hanging oil lamp from Java, circa 9th/early 10th century. It would have stood on a platform above an oil-filled reservoir and, as the lamp moved, the light shining through the curving scrolls of his tail would have created flickering patterns on the surrounding walls. In India and South-east Asia the kinnara (male) and kinnari (female) are regarded as cheerful celestial musicians. According to Hindu beliefs, they symbolise the concept of love as their half-human, half-bird form represents the harmony that two different individuals can find together. The kinnara couple remains perpetually and uninterruptedly beloved of each other in the Himavanta, a magical forest surrounding Mount Meru (the centre of the universe). Javanese lamp finials depicting the couple seem to have been popular, perhaps in the bedchamber. It is possible this finial was from a pair of lamps with the kinnari on the companion one. A figure of the kinnari in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (Eilenberg Collection), is a possible candidate.

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Thinking Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd/early 4th century. Grey schist. Height: 51 cm

A grey schist figure of a Thinking Bodhisattva, 3rd/early 4th century, is a wonderful example of the creative powers of Gandharan sculptors. Their understanding of anatomy and familiarity with both the long-standing Hellenistic tradition and the evolving South Asian artistic conventions resulted in a uniquely beautiful form of extraordinary sensitivity, expressing a degree of emotion unusual in South Asian art. This figure was probably part of a tableau depicting a vision of the Buddhist paradise with an ensemble of acolytes surrounding a central image of the Buddha. Dressed in the finest robes and bedecked with jewellery, the Bodhisattva is a prince of Buddhism and his appearance alludes to political and social issues that devotees would have understood.

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Jambahadyah or Phagpa Lokeshvara. Nepal, Kathmandu Valley. Early Malla period, circa 14th century, wood, height 88 cm

John Eskenazi is particularly pleased to have re-acquired a fine wood figure from the Kathmandu Valley depicting Jambahadyah, known in Tibet as Phagpa Lokeshvara, an extremely rare form of the popular bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, the embodiment of compassion. Published in Arte Himalayana, Eskenazi, Milan, 1979, Jambahadyah is identified by his curious curved crown and tasselled ear ornaments and he holds his right hand in varadamudra (bestowing of boons). The Newar people of the Kathmandu Valley are famed for their craftsmanship and the sublimely modest demeanour of the figure is typical of the Kathmandu Valley style, as is his understated elegance. This sculpture dates from the early Malla period, 14th century, or possibly earlier, and its excellent state of preservation is due in part to the fact that it was once realistically painted, traces of which survive over the entire surface.

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Royal Mandala. Cambodia, Angkor Empire. Angkor Wat, mid 12th century, Bronze, height 34 cm; diameter: 28 cm

A mid-12th century bronze Royal Mandala, Cambodian, Angkor Empire, from Ankor Wat, is an enigmatic piece comprising eight identical figures seated around a larger one that dates from a period when political and religious responsibility were intrinsically joined. The central figure resembles known portraits of the founder of Angkor Wat, King Suryavarman II (1113 to circa 1150), and the mandala dates either from his reign or the period immediately following his death. The iconography cannot be ascribed to any Hindu or Buddhist belief known to have existed at Angkor and possibly represents royal authority delegated to officers of state who were bound by an oath of loyalty to the king. Like its spiritual equivalent, the mandala belongs to the sphere of secretive, long-obscure rituals conducted to maintain the status quo at the heart of the Angkor Empire.

John Eskenazi is well-known for his knowledge of the ancient cultures to which these works of art belong and his exhibitions in New York attract collectors and museum curators who are drawn to the quality and aesthetic beauty of the pieces on show. He established his own London gallery in Mayfair in 1994, having originally joined the family business of Eskenazi in 1977 which had been founded by his father Victor in Milan in the 1920s. Since 2006 John Eskenazi has been a private dealer, available to clients by appointment. His expertise and scholarship in Indian and South-east Asian art are internationally recognised and his clients include major museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London as well as discerning private collectors.

“India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow” @ LACMA

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Muhammad Azam, Portrait of Nasir al-Din Haidar, circa 1830. Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 72.1 cm. Collection Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan. Photo: Courtesy the Collection Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan.

LOS ANGELES, CA.- The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) presents India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow —the first major international exhibition devoted to the cosmopolitan culture of the northern Indian court of Lucknow, and the refined artistic production of the city’s multiethnic residents and artists. On view from December 12, 2010 through February 27, 2011, the exhibition includes almost 200 artworks: European oil paintings, watercolors, and prints; Indian opaque watercolor paintings generally made for albums, vintage photography, textiles, and garments, and a range of decorative art objects including metalwork, glassware, weaponry, and jewelry.

Organized by Stephen Markel, LACMA curator of South & Southeast Asian art and department head, and Tushara Bindu Gude, associate curator, The Art of Courtly Lucknow not only presents the unique artistic traditions of Lucknow, but also provides a framework for understanding the history of this extraordinary region and the nature of India’s colonial history and memory.

“Lucknow was the nexus point for one of the great dramas of history,” said Markel. “Not only were starkly diverse cultures competing with immense riches and political domination at stake, but the dynamic lead characters and brilliant aesthetic achievements all made for a deeply poignant era and vital artistic legacy.”

Lucknow was the capital of Awadh (a province in the Mughal Empire located in the present-day Indian state of Uttar Pradesh), and has become identified with the broader region and culture. From the mid-eighteenth century until the establishment of formal British rule in India in 1858, Lucknow overshadowed Delhi—the capital of the Mughal dynasty—to become the cultural center of northern India. Indian artists, poets, and courtiers flocked to Awadh seeking security and patronage, as Delhi suffered an extended period of unrest beginning in 1739.

European artists, travelers and political agents were also soon lured to the region, seduced by tales of the wealth, opulence, and the generosity of Lucknow’s rulers (nawabs) and by the beauty of the city itself. The dynamic interaction between Indians and Europeans, the interplay between their respective tastes and traditions, and the hybrid lives led by many of Lucknow’s residents are explored in the exhibition and accompanying publication.

The Art of Courtly Lucknow examines this interaction against the broader narrative of India’s colonial history. Following the Indian Uprising of 1857(also known as the Great Mutiny, Rebellion, or First Indian War of Independence) and the consolidation of British power in India, Lucknow’s prestige decreased dramatically. It continued, however, to be an important center for the production of luxury objects and a key destination for European and Indian visitors.

British and Indian artworks of the late nineteenth century indicate the different ways in which the image and memory of Lucknow were deployed. Many works chart the loss of diversity and the fixing of national identities and aspirations, but some also recall Lucknow’s past glory. In the popular culture of modern-day India, Lucknow has an ambiguous history. It evokes nostalgia for a lost past but is also presented as a source of national and cultural pride.

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Thomas Jones Barker, The Relief of Lucknow, 1857-1859. Oil on canvas, 105.4 x 181.3 cm. National Portrait Gallery, London, 5851 © Photo National Portrait Gallery, London

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Mir Kalan Khan, Lovers in a Landscape (Detail), India, Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow, c. 1760–70, Opaque watercolor on paper, Page 16 x 11 inches; image 8 1/4 x 6 inches, The David Collection, Copenhagen, 50/1981.

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Museum for Islamische Kunst, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany/Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz/Art Resource, NY

TreasuresInstallation

Attributed to Abu’l Hasan (India, born 1588/89, active c. 1600–1635), Emperor Jahangir (reigned 1605–1627) Triumphing Over Poverty, c. 1622, Ink, opaque water color, and gold on paper, 9 3/8 x 6 in. (23.8 x 15.2 cm), From the Nasli and Alice Heeramaneck Collection, Museum Associates Purchase, M.75.4.28.

 Deux Plats. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle @ Cornette de Saint Cyr

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Plat. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle © Cornette de Saint Cyr

A décor moulé de pivoines entourées de lignes verticales cherchant à évoquer des pétales de fleurs. Couverte céladon. D. 25,5, H. 5,5 cm. Estimation : 300 / 400 €

Retrouvé dans l’épave d’un bateau au large de l’île de Hon Dam, province de Kiên Giang, Sud Vietnam

Cf.: Vietnam Antiques Magazine (Cô Vât), No. 15, April 2006, p. 39.

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Plat. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle © Cornette de Saint Cyr

A décor de cercles et motifs sinueux à l’intérieur et de lignes verticales à l’extérieur. Couverte céladon. D. 25,3, H. 8,4 cm.

Retrouvé dans l’épave d’un bateau au large de l’île de Hon Dam, province de Kien Giang Sud Vietnam

Cf. : Vietnam Antiques Magazine (Cô Vât), No. 4, December 2003, p. 18

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Lundi 29 novembre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL ( +33 6 09 22 55 13). Consultant Philippe TRUONG ( +33 6 31 34 40 59). Drouot Richelieu – Salle 7 – 9, rue Drouot – 75009 Paris. Pour tout renseignement , veuillez contacter Laura Cristau au : +33 1 47 27 11 24

 Tête de lion en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, XIIe siècle.

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Tête de lion  en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, XIIe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

la crinière finement sculptée, les oreilles dressées et la gueule ouverte laissant apparaître ses crocs. H : 35 cm – Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Pierre Bergé & associés. Orient – Extrême Orient. Lundi 15 novembre à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu – Salle 7 – Paris. EMail : contact@pba-auctions.com

 

Tête de Garuda en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, Angkor, XIIe siècle.

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Tête de Garuda en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, Angkor, XIIe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

coiffé d’un haut diadème richement décoré de fleurs, les yeux grands ouverts exorbitants, les oreilles parées de bijoux. H : 23 cm – Estimation : 10 000 / 12 000 €

Torse de divinité masculine en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, style de Koh-Ker, deuxième quart du Xe siècle.

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Torse de divinité masculine en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, style de Koh-Ker, deuxième quart du Xe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

vêtu d’un sampot plissé à double chute en ancre antérieure et dont le bord supérieur est rabattu à l’avant. H : 170 cm – Estimation : 150 000 / 200 000 €

Provenance : Succession José Garnier 1968 ; Collection Privée Belge.

Référence : Statue de Vajimurka/Hayagriva avec vêtement similaire reproduit dans « Angkor. Göttilches Erbe Kambodschas », catalogue d’exposition du 15/12/2006 au 09/04/2007 à la Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland à Bonn, n°39, p. 121.
Un autre modèle de Vajimukha/Hayagriva de style Prè Rup conservé au Musée Guimet, Paris, réf. MG 18099.
Le vêtement et la posture légèrement rigide, ainsi que sa taille importante de ce torse est typique du style Koh-Ker.

Notes: L’empire khmer est fondé par Jayavarman II en 802.
Son successeur Indravarman Il entreprend des travaux d’irrigation importants servant de base à la prospérité du royaume khmer.
Ce système d’exploitation intensif des sols pour en faire des rizières fera du peuple khmer une des civilisations les plus développées de l’Antiquité.
En un siècle, sous modèle indonésien, la civilisation khmère unifie son pays et acquiert une notoriété remarquable en Asie du Sud-est.
La production importante de céréales permet à une grande partie de la population de se consacrer entièrement à la construction de temples et à développer leur religion, dans un premier temps l’hindouisme, puis le vishnouisme et le bouddhisme.
Ainsi naît un nombre considérable de temples-montagnes autour d’Angkor, la capitale du royaume khmer.
Ces temples-montagnes, construits sur des collines naturelles, sont des représentations du Mont Meru, le centre de l’Univers et le séjour des dieux dans la cosmologie indienne.
La statuaire khmère est à son apogée au Xe et XIe siècle, on peut trouver des pièces de tailles impressionnantes et d’une finesse extrêmement soignée.
Chaque roi fait de sa religion une religion d’état, ainsi sous Jayavarman IIe au IXe siècle il s’agit de l’hindouisme, sous Sûryavarman IIe au XIIe siècle le vishnouisme, sous Jayavarman VII le bouddhisme mahâyâna.
Ces différentes religions font office de miroir de la société de l’époque.
Angkor Thom est le dernier exploit de ce peuple riche en culture et en savoir.
Mais les khmers sont victimes de leur propre grandeur et de l’épuisement de ressources, ainsi que de la force de l’empire thaï qui commence à s’étendre dans toute l’Asie du Sud-Est.
Ainsi s’achève la grande période prospère du Cambodge.

Three dagger, Mughal India, 18th century @ Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd, Asian Art in London

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A gem-set rock crystal-hilted dagger. Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

43 cm. With slightly curving watered steel blade, the hilt set with rows of gemstones including rubies and emeralds set in gold – Price on request

Provenance : Warren Anderson collection, Australia, 1980s-1992;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1407;
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Published : Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1407 (illustrated in colour)

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A gem-set and gold-inlaid jade-hilted dagger. Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

39 cm. dagger; 41.5 cm. with scab. With curving watered steel blade, the white jade hilt inlaid with floral decoration set with emeralds and rubies; the red velvet-covered scabbard with gold repoussé chape and locket. Price on request

Provenance : Warren Anderson collection, Australia;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1315;
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Exhibited : Splendeur des Armes Orientales, 4 May – 31 July 1988, page 112, Paris, 1988

Published : Philippe Missillier and Howard Ricketts, Splendeur des Armes Orientales, 4 May – 31 July 1988, page 112, Paris, 1988.

Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1311 (illustrated in colour)

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A rock crystal-hilted dagger, Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

41.5 cm. With curving watered steel blade, the hilt carved with floral and foliate decoration on either side, with curving pommel. Price on request

Provenance : Lord McAlpine of West Green, London, 1980s, inventory number M.5217;
Warren Anderson collection, Australia, 1980s-1992;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1313
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Published : Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1313 (illustrated in colour)

Padmapani. Basalte. Inde. (Bengale / Bihar) ca 12° siècle

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Padmapani. Basalte. Inde. (Bengale-Bihar) ca 12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 32 cm – Estimation : 3 000 / 5 000 €

Cette petite stèle est ornée en son centre d’une représentation de l’aspect “porteur de lotus” d’Avalokitesvara le bodhisattva de la compassion assis en ardhaparyanka sur un socle lotiforme soutenu par sa tige émergeant des eaux primordiales.
Sa main gauche tient le lotus éponyme, et la droite fait le geste de don, varadhamudra.
Il est entouré par un couple d’attendants.
Le registre inférieur est sculpté d’un personnage agenouillé, peut-être le donateur, et d’offrandes.
Un stupa est stylisé au sommet de la stèle. Quelques restaurations visibles.

Provenance  Collection de Madame A.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Devi. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Devi. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 31 cm. Petits accidents et manques visibles -

Superbe représentation d’une divinité féminine richement parée, assise dans une superbe attitude déhanchée, présentant une fleur dans la paume de sa main droite.
La synthèse des éléments stylistiques de cette œuvre permet de la rapprocher des archétypes de la statuaire féminine de la période Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

Parsvanatha. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Uttar Pradesh). 9° siècle.

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Parsvanatha. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Uttar Pradesh). 9° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 80 cm. Accidents et manques visibles. Estimation : 50 000 / 75 000 €

Cette remarquable et importante sculpture présente le jina Parsvanatha, nu, le classique ornement srivatsa marquant sa poitrine, assis en méditation dans l’attitude du lotus (vajraparyankasana), les mains posées dans son giron en dhyana mudra, la tête encore partiellement abritée par les restes d’un capuchon de naga.
La pointe de la queue du roi-serpent passe sous le corps du jina et vient retomber sur le devant su socle.
Cette particularité iconographique fait référence à l’épisode au cours duquel il pratiquait une forme de méditation sous un dhataki et où Samvara déclenche une tempête pour l’interrompre.
Le nagaraja Dharanendra vient alors déployer son capuchon au dessus de sa tête pour l’abriter et lui permettre de poursuivre sa méditation.
Le sculpteur de cette importante représentation a parfaitement su allier la classique rigueur des lignes et des volumes du corps caractéristiques de l’esthétique jaïne à une expression rayonnante du visage accentuée par la disposition des écailles du corps du serpent.
L’intérêt de cette sculpture est encore renforcé par une inscription gravée sur le socle mentionnant la date Samvat 922, correspondant aux années 865/866 de notre ère si l’on tient compte de l’ère Vikrama en vigueur alors en Inde du Nord.

 

Buddha. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Buddha. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 23 cm – Estimation : 8 000 / 10 000 €

Plaque de parement ornée d’une figure du Buddha assis en vajraparyankasana (attitude du lotus).
En dépit d’accidents et de manques visibles, on notera le beau modelé du corps, des pieds et du visage qui sont totalement caractéristiques de l’esthétique Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

Scènes de la vie du Buddha. Schiste. Art du Gandhara. ca 2°-4° siècles

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Scènes de la vie du Buddha. Schiste. Art du Gandhara. ca 2°-4° siècles. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 40 cm -

Ce bel ornement architectural reprenant la forme classique de l’arc indien (kudu), présente trois épisodes de la vie du Buddha.
Au registre inférieur, on peut identifier la “grand départ”, évasion du Buddha du palais de son père, monté sur son cheval.
Au dessus, il est figuré en méditation entouré d’adorants, et le cartouche supérieur nous le présente debout, la main droite en varadamudra, la gauche redressée, maintenant le retour de l’uttarasanga .
Cet élément est tout à fait caractéristique du style communément qualifié de “gréco-bouddhique” tel qu’il s’est développé dans le nord-ouest de l’empire Kusan

Provenance : Collection Européenne

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Tête anthropomorphe. Terre cuite.. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Tête anthropomorphe. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 20,5 cm. Petits accidents et manques visibles.

Très belle et imposante tête de personnage présentant une riche coiffure bouclée, et une superbe asymétrie au niveau des l’ornementation des oreilles.
La lèvre inférieure est ourlée.
Tous ces éléments sont caractéristiques des meilleurs exemples plastiques de l’esthétique de la période Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Divinités attendantes. Grès. Inde Centrale ca 8° / 10° siècle

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Divinités attendantes. Grès. Inde Centrale ca 8° – 10° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 57 cm. Anciens accidents et rebouchages visibles – Estimation : 5 000 / 8 000 €

Ce couple de divinités est figuré debout dans l’attitude classique de la triple flexion (tribhanga).
Les deux brandissent de leur main gauche un attribut assez délicat à définir avec précision, probablement une fleur.
Entre les deux, se tient une petite divinité féminine tenant un attribut également délicat à interpréter.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Devati. Grès. Inde. (Uttar Pradesh) ca 10°-12° siècle

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Devati. Grès. Inde. (Uttar Pradesh) ca 10°-12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 55 cm – Estimation : 6 000 / 10 000 €

Cette belle représentation d’un personnage à quatre bras, debout dans l’attitude de la triple flexion (tribhanga), est assez inhabituelle.
Une de ses mains droites maintient une tige de lotus sortant d’un vase reposant sur le sol.
Ses deux mains gauches portent un vase à eau (kamandalu) et probablement ce qu’il reste d’une fleur de lotus ou d’un serpent au capuchon déployé.
L’association du kamandalu, vase des ascètes et d’un potentiel serpent, permettrait de relier cette rare et belle image à un contexte sivaïte.
Ce type de grés rouge moucheté est généralement considéré comme caractéristique de la région de Mathura en Uttar Pradesh.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Varuna. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Rajasthan), ca 11°-12° siècle

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Varuna. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Rajasthan), ca 11°-12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 67 cm – Estimation : 10 000 / 15 000 €

Cette divinité figurée debout entre deux colonnes dans un superbe tribhanga (attitude de triple flexion) avait initialement quatre bras. Sa main restante maintient un lien (pasa) formant un nœud complexe.
A ses pieds, on eut voir la gueule d’un makara, le monstre marin mythologique à forme complexe essentiellement identifiable sa trompe.
L’association du pasa comme attribut et du makara permettent d’envisager que nous puissions être en présence d’un aspect de Varuna.
Varuna serait depuis les temps védiques durant lesquels il était l’esprit du “ciel étoilé”, associé au cosmos qui nous entoure.
Il fait office de gardien de l’ordre céleste.
Etant également celui qui entend tout, il fait fonction de garant des serments en liant les hommes avec son “lacet magique”.
Il fait également office de gardien de la direction de l’Ouest.
Egalement dieu des eaux souterraines et maître des créatures marines, il est souvent flanqué des deux déesses fluviales Ganga et Yamuna

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

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Visnu. Grès rose. Inde. (Probablement Rajasthan). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 56,5 cm – Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Ce beau relief présente un aspect classique de Visnu, debout dans l’attitude de la triple flexion (tribhanga), sur un lotus épanoui, sous une arcature soutenue par deux colonnes.
De ses quatre mains, il tient ses attributs classiques, la fleur de lotus (qui symboliserait l’esprit pur), la conque (les cinq éléments), la massue (l’intelligence) et le disque (la pensée).
De part et d’autre des colonnes, il est entouré de divinités célestes féminines porteuses de cauri (chasse mouches), en mouvement.
Au registre supérieur on peut observer une personne adorante et probablement une nagini protégée par un calotte de cobra à plusieurs têtes.
On notera le très beau rendu classique de la souplesse des corps sur cette sculpture.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Skanda, Kumara et Uma. Grès. Inde. (probablement Madhya Pradesh) ca 11° siècle

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Skanda, Kumara et Uma. Grès. Inde. (probablement Madhya Pradesh) ca 11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 74 cm – Estimation : 20 000 / 25 000 €

Ce superbe relief dans lequel le sculpteur tente clairement de s’affranchir de l’art frontal de la stèle pour tenter d’aller vers la ronde bosse dans une remarquable dynamique nous présente trois personnages, deux femmes debout, et un plus petit assis, à priori un enfant.
Ce dernier est assis en position de délassement (ardhaparyanka), sur le dos d’un oiseau semblant dévorer des serpents.
Sa coiffure marquée de trois mèches hautes sur l’arrière (trisira) permet de confirmer son identification en tant que Skanda, fils de Siva, dieu de la guerre, eternel adolescent dont la monture (vahana), est un paon tueur de serpents du nom de Paravani.
Il brandit de sa main gauche une arme inhabituelle oscillant entre le boomerang et la lance, qui est censée ne jamais manquer sa cible.
La mythologie de Skanda, également appelé Kumara ou Karttikeya, en référence au fait qu’il aurait été élevé par les pléiades, est très ancienne et complexe.
Les femmes sont exclues de son culte car il est le symbole de l’abstinence sexuelle.
Derrière lui, se tient une déesse debout portant une fleur de lotus dans chacune de ses mains, indiquant qu’il s’agit très probablement de sa mère Uma.
Une attendante est projetée vers l’avant, se retournant sur sa gauche pour regarder l’Image de Siva qui devait initialement occuper le centre de la stèle dont cet élément devait constituer la base du montant gauche du parikarma.
En pendant, devaient se trouver une autre attendante, Ganesa le second fils de Siva et Parvati sa mère, autre aspect d’ Uma.
A l’arrière plan, il faut remarquer un beau registre de rinceaux de lotus, la tête d’un éléphant, et la partie inférieure du corps d’un Vyala.
De par ses qualités et certains éléments stylistiques, cette superbe sculpture peut être attribuée aux artistes de l’ancien royaume Haihaya dont de nombreux vestiges sont encore visibles au Madhya Pradesh

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Ganesa dansant. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle

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Ganesa dansant. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 57 cm. Accidents, manques et fractures visibles. Estimation : 8 000 / 12 000 €

Ganesa est ici représenté debout, dans une attitude de danse, et arborant trois paires de bras.
Le passage du temps a effacé ou rendu délicats à interpréter les attributs initialement reliés à chacune de ses mains, seules les deux supérieures maintiennent clairement un serpent formant un arc au dessus de sa tête.
Cette façon de saisir ainsi un serpent, symbole sivaïte par excellence, est sans nul doute également destinée à faire écho à la peau d’éléphant parfois brandie par Siva.
A sa gauche, au pied d’une colonne est figuré un personnage assis dans la position caractéristique de nombreux ascètes sivaïtes.
De telles représentations de Ganesa dansant constituent sans nul doute un puissant écho aux fameuses représentations de Siva Nataraja (roi de la danse) effectuant sa danse cosmique de création et destruction du monde.
Les sculptures présentant cette iconographie auraient initialement été placées à l’extérieur au sud des sanctuaires afin d’être une des premières images vues par les dévots venant exécuter leurs circumambulations

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Tête de Bhairava. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle

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Tête de Bhairava. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 27 cm. Accidents, manques et quelques rebouchages visibles. Estimation : 6 000 / 10 000 €

Très belle tête, présentant Siva dans toute sa plénitude, avec une courte barbe et une moustache entourant une bouche aux commissures des lèvres creusées pour indiquer une tension.
Ses yeux sont sculptés d’une manière plus globuleuse que la normale.
Un troisième œil vertical marque son front.
La coiffure est nattée en un chignon vertical maintenu à sa base par un diadème orné de têtes de morts.
Tous ces éléments constituent les conventions iconographiques les plus classiques des représentations de Bhairava, un des aspects farouches majeurs de Siva. Bhairava serait un aspect terrible de Siva apparu après qu’il ait décapité Brahma, “le Créateur”.
Poursuivi par le remord, il erre tel un ascète avec le crâne de Brahma fixé à sa main en guise de bol à aumône jusqu’à ce que celui-ci ne se détache en parvenant à Varanasi, au moment où d’un saut, il dépasse le Temps (Kala) qui était en lui, devient Mahakala (le Temps transcendant), et alors que le temps disparaît, devient Bhairava.
Avec une claire opposition entre l’apparente rondeur, voire douceur du contour du visage et les signes distinctifs de la divinité terrible, cette œuvre constitue un bon témoignage du talent des artistes indiens pour transcender la pierre et donner vie à l’ambivalence caractéristique de Siva.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24