Pameran Keramik euro Majolica(The Majolica Porcelein Exhibition)

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                                            Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                                                         

    BUNGA IDOLA PENEMU : BUNGA KERAJAAN MING SERUNAI( CHRYSANTHENUM)

  

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SHOWCASE :

Frame One :

Pameran Keramik Euro Majolica(The Majolica Porcelain Exhibition)

1.Tray

2 Madonna Maria and Jesus Christ

3.ROMAN SCENE

4.FAMOUS MAN

5.Mytologic

6.Paolo Rubini gold plated

Frame Two :

The Majolica Porselein Historic Collections

 

Maiolica

Istoriato decoration on a plate from Castel Durante, c.1550-1570 (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lille)

Maiolica, sometimes called majolica in English-speaking countries, is Italian tin-glazed pottery dating from the Renaissance. It is decorated in bright colours on a white background, frequently depicting historical and legendary scenes.

Contents

 

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 Name

The name is thought to come from the medieval Italian word for Majorca, an island on the route for ships bringing Hispano-Moresque wares from Valencia to Italy. Moorish potters from Majorca are reputed to have worked in Sicily and it has been suggested that their wares reached the Italian mainland from Caltagirone[1] An alternative explanation of the name is that it comes from the Spanish term obra de Malaga, denoting “[imported] wares from Malaga”.[2]

During the Renaissance, the term maiolica referred solely to lusterware, including both Italian-made and Spanish imports, but eventually the term came to be used when describing ceramics made in Italy, lustered or not, of tin-glazed earthenware. With the Spanish conquest of Mexico, tin-glazed maiolica wares came to be produced in the Valley of Mexico as early as 1540, at first in imitation of tin-glazed pottery imported from Seville.[3] Mexican maiolica is known famously as ‘Talavera‘.

Istoriato charger, Faenza, ca 1555 (Dallas Museum of Art)

 Tin-glazed earthenware

Tin glazing creates a brilliant white, opaque surface for painting. The colours are applied as metallic oxides or as fritted underglazes to the unfired glaze, which absorbs pigment like fresco, making errors impossible to fix, but preserving the brilliant colors. Sometimes the surface is covered with a second glaze (called coperta by the Italians) that lends greater shine and brilliance to the wares. In the case of lustred wares, a further firing at a lower temperature is required. Kilns required wood (which contributed to deforestation even of the unplantable hillsides at ever higher altitudes) as well as suitable clay. Glaze was made from sand, wine lees, lead and tin.[4]

The fifteenth-century wares that initiated maiolica as an art form were the product of an evolution in which medieval lead-glazed wares were improved by the addition of tin oxides under the influence of Islamic wares imported through Sicily.[5] Such archaic wares[6] are sometimes called “proto-maiolica”.[7] During the later fourteenth century, the limited palette of colours was expanded from the traditional manganese purple and copper green to include cobalt blue, antimony yellow and iron-oxide orange. Sgraffito wares were also produced, in which the white tin-oxide glaze was scratched through to produce a design from the revealed body of the ware. Sgraffito wasters excavated from kilns in Bacchereto, Montelupo and Florence show that such wares were produced more widely than at Perugia and Città di Castello, the places to which they have been traditionally attributed.[8]

Dish with bird, in Islamic-derived style, Orvieto, ca.1270-1330 (Victoria and Albert Museum)

 History of production

Refined production of tin-glazed earthenwares made for more than local needs was concentrated in central Italy from the later thirteenth century, especially in the contada of Florence. The medium was also adopted by the Della Robbia family of Florentine sculptors. The city itself declined in importance in the second half of the fifteenth century, perhaps because of local deforestation, while the production scattered among small communes[9] and, after mid-fifteenth century, at Faenza. Significantly, in a contract of 1490[10] twenty-three master-potters of Montelupo agreed to sell the year’s production to Francesco Antinori of Florence; Montelupo provided the experienced potters who were set up in 1495 at the Villa Medicea di Cafaggiolo‎ by its Medici owners.[11] Florentine wares spurred characteristic productions in the fifteenth century at Arezzo and Siena.

Dish from Deruta, 2nd quarter of the 16th century, shows the full range of glaze colors (Victoria and Albert Museum)

In the fifteenth century Italian maiolica reached an astonishing degree of perfection. In Romagna, Faenza, which gave its name to faience, produced fine maiolica from the early fifteenth century; it was the only fair-sized city in which the ceramic industry became a major economic component.[12] Bologna produced lead-glazed wares for export. Orvieto and Deruta both produced maioliche in the fifteenth century. In the sixteenth century, maiolica production was established at Castel Durante, Urbino, Gubbio and Pesaro. The early sixteenth century saw the development of istoriato wares on which historical and legendary scenes were painted in great detail. The State Museum of Medieval and Modern Art in Arezzo claims to have the largest collection of istoriato wares in Italy. Istoriato wares are also well represented in the British Museum, London.

Some maiolica was produced as far north as Padua, Venice and Turin and as far south as Palermo and Caltagirone in Sicily.[13] In the seventeenth century Savona began to be a prominent place of manufacture.

The variety of styles that arose in the sixteenth century all but defies classification.[14] Italian cities encouraged the start of a new pottery industry by offering tax relief, citizenship, monopoly rights and protection from outside imports.

An important mid-sixteenth century document for the techniques of maiolica painting is the treatise of Cipriano Piccolpasso, not a professional potter himself.[15] Individual sixteenth-century masters like Nicola da Urbino, Francesco Xanto Avelli, Guido Durantino and Orazio Fontana of Urbino, Mastro Giorgio of Gubbio and Maestro Domenigo of Venice all deserve individual treatment. Gubbio lustre used colours such as greenish yellow, strawberry pink and a ruby red. The tradition of maiolica died away in the eighteenth century, under competition from inexpensive porcelains and white earthenware.

Some of the principal centers of production (e.g. Deruta and Montelupo) still produce maiolica, which is sold world wide. Modern maiolica looks different from old maiolica because its glaze is usually opacified with the cheaper zircon rather than tin, though there are potteries that specialise in making authentic-looking Renaissance-style pieces with genuine tin-glaze.

“By a convenient extension and limitation the name may be applied to all tin-glazed ware, of whatever nationality, made in the Italian tradition … the name faïence (or the synonymous English ‘delftware’) being reserved for the later wares of the 17th Century onwards, either in original styles (as in the case of the French) or, more frequently, in the Dutch-Chinese (Delft) tradition.”[16] The term “maiolica” is sometimes applied to modern tin-glazed ware made by studio potters (as in Osterman’s book, see below).

The English word, majolica, is also used for Victorian majolica, a different type of pottery with clear, coloured glazes.

WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF VICTORIAN MAJOLICA

  ENGLISH MAJOLICA POTTERY, made between 1850 and 1900 is our specialty–All kinds, shapes, forms and sizes. We offer the largest rolling collection for sale in the United States.  After establishing the antiques business in early 1983, we have been ever increasingly involved in the purchase and sale of Victorian majolica and have evolved to become this country’s leading majolica specialist. 

 

Although we offer items from other countries, we primarily feature noted English MAJOLICA makers, such as Minton, George Jones, Wedgwood, Joseph Holdcroft, T.C. Brown, Westhead, Moore & Co., William Brownfield, Copeland, Fielding and Worcester, which represent over 95% of our inventory. We also offer a selection of MAJOLICA in the Palissy style from the late 19th century. If you desire to collect the very best in MAJOLICA, then we encourage you to continue to browse our site.  majolica
 representative sampling of typical items  finer quality, mostly charity benefit antique shows around the Country.

Please review our SHOW SCHEDULE page. This will allow you to keep track of our whereabouts and perhaps assist you in scheduling a visit to one of our shows.

 

 

 

 Category:Italian maiolica

 Renaissance and modern maiolica

Blue and white vase with oak-leaf decor, Florence, 1430. Louvre Museum

An albarello (drug jar) from Venice or Castel Durante, 16th century. Approx 30cm high. Decorated in cobalt blue, copper green, antimony yellow and yellow ochre. Burrell Collection

Modern tiles from Deruta.

A modern plate from Caltagirone, Sicily, painted in cobalt blue.

A modern vase from Caltagirone, Sicily.

A modern plate from Faenza, adapting a traditional Chinese design.

Majolica

1.Majolica Italy

 

A native of the region, Sergio Pilastri proposes Maiolica / Majolica ceramics which he has hand-painted according to the traditions of Montelupo Fiorentino, Tuscany. This Tuscan ceramic was made in Italy and signed by Sergio Pilastri. The region of Montelupo has been transcending the art of producing and decorating terra cotta since the 14th century. Check out my other items made in Tuscany!

NOTE: Photo of back is of a different plate, this one is signed on the front in the bottom right of the photo, the photo of the back is to show how it hangs only.

This decorative plate is 12 cm (4.72 “) in diameter. It is dishwasher and microwave safe. The back is shaped to use a wire or string to hang it on the wall. Gift wrapping is available free on request. Shipping fees includes international priority shipping which takes approximately 7-10 days. Since items are shipped from Europe shipping times are not guaranteed. See shipping information on our ebay store homepage. We combine shipping and offer multiple item discounts. Packages over 2kg are automatically insured. Contact us at with any questions.

Majolica , spelled Maiolica in Italian, the tin-oxide-glazed, painted earthenware pottery of Italy, reached a summit of artistic quality during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Majolica resulted from the grafting of the Islamic ceramic tradition of tin-glazing onto the ancient traditions of native Italian pottery. This occurred early in the 15th century, when sophisticated Hispano-Moresque wares from Valencia were imitated by Italian potters. The name majolica is derived from the island of Majorca, the headquarters of trading vessels sailing between Spanish and Italian ports. One of the principal Italian centers of majolica production, the town of Faenza, later gave its name to the French term for the ware, faience.

The molded or thrown clay piece was given a first, or “bisque” firing, then covered with an opaque lead- and tin-oxide glaze. (Leadless glazes are the standard for contemporary majolica potters, however.) Decorations were painted on the dry glaze, and a second firing fused both glaze and decoration to an even, glossy surface. This direct painting technique led to vigorous designs and novel imagery, producing some of the most delightful and artistically satisfying creations in European ceramic history.

Deruta ware is characterized especially by a unique mother-of-pearl, metallic lustre and by certain decorative features. In the art of lustre, Deruta potters, who introduced an iridescent gold lustre decoration, may be held second only to the potters of Gubbio. Although Deruta majolica displays most of the decorative features common in the Renaissance, it is innovative in at least two respects: the molding of plates with a design in slight relief, the lower part coloured dark to give an even more lustrous effect; and the division of the broad borders of the plates into panels with alternating geometric stripes. These dishes, illustrating subjects from mythology or religion, are at times somewhat harsh and heavy, and the designs of vases and jars are sometimes flat or crude, but, at its most successful, Deruta majolica has a distinctive flamboyance.

A native of the region, Sergio Pilastri proposes Maiolica / Majolica ceramics which he has hand-painted according to the traditions of Montelupo Fiorentino, Tuscany. This Tuscan ceramic was made in Italy and signed by Sergio Pilastri. The region of Montelupo has been transcending the art of producing and decorating terra cotta since the 14th century. Check out my other items made in Tuscany!

NOTE: Photo of back is of a different plate, this one is signed on the front in the bottom right of the photo, the photo of the back is to show how it hangs only.

This decorative plate is 12 cm (4.72 “) in diameter. It is dishwasher and microwave safe. The back is shaped to use a wire or string to hang it on the wall. Gift wrapping is available free on request. Shipping fees includes international priority shipping which takes approximately 7-10 days. Since items are shipped from Europe shipping times are not guaranteed. See shipping information on our ebay store homepage. We combine shipping and offer multiple item discounts. Packages over 2kg are automatically insured. Contact us at with any questions.

Majolica , spelled Maiolica in Italian, the tin-oxide-glazed, painted earthenware pottery of Italy, reached a summit of artistic quality during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Majolica resulted from the grafting of the Islamic ceramic tradition of tin-glazing onto the ancient traditions of native Italian pottery. This occurred early in the 15th century, when sophisticated Hispano-Moresque wares from Valencia were imitated by Italian potters. The name majolica is derived from the island of Majorca, the headquarters of trading vessels sailing between Spanish and Italian ports. One of the principal Italian centers of majolica production, the town of Faenza, later gave its name to the French term for the ware, faience.

The molded or thrown clay piece was given a first, or “bisque” firing, then covered with an opaque lead- and tin-oxide glaze. (Leadless glazes are the standard for contemporary majolica potters, however.) Decorations were painted on the dry glaze, and a second firing fused both glaze and decoration to an even, glossy surface. This direct painting technique led to vigorous designs and novel imagery, producing some of the most delightful and artistically satisfying creations in European ceramic history.

Deruta ware is characterized especially by a unique mother-of-pearl, metallic lustre and by certain decorative features. In the art of lustre, Deruta potters, who introduced an iridescent gold lustre decoration, may be held second only to the potters of Gubbio. Although Deruta majolica displays most of the decorative features common in the Renaissance, it is innovative in at least two respects: the molding of plates with a design in slight relief, the lower part coloured dark to give an even more lustrous effect; and the division of the broad borders of the plates into panels with alternating geometric stripes. These dishes, illustrating subjects from mythology or religion, are at times somewhat harsh and heavy, and the designs of vases and jars are sometimes flat or crude, but, at its most successful, Deruta majolica has a distinctive flamboyance.

Majolica Netherland Information 

majolica-kom uit Mexico

Majolica is de naam voor een grof en bros soort keramiek met een bont gekleurde beschildering. De naam majolica is een verbastering van het Spaanse Mallorca, een eiland in de Middellandse Zee en het middeleeuwse centrum voor de productie van dat type aardewerk. De techniek is afkomstig uit Noord-Afrika en het Midden-Oosten. Toen aan het einde van de 15e eeuw de Moren uit Spanje werden verdreven, verhuisde een deel van de aardewerkproductie naar Faence in Italië. In Italië wordt faience nog steeds majolica genoemd. In het Nederlands wordt een onderscheid gemaakt.

Bij majolica is de scherf rood vanwege het ijzergehalte van de klei. Dat is te zien bij beschadiging aan de rand. Het eindproduct wordt bedekt met tinglazuur, enkel aan de bovenkant. Het tamelijk giftige loodglazuur wordt gebruikt aan de onderkant. Bij het bakken van majolica wordt gebruikgemaakt van driehoekige standers, de zogenaamde proenen. De proenen worden afgebroken en de resten zoveel mogelijk weggevijld.

Er heerst veel verwarring met het begrip faience, waarvan de klei met kalk of mergel is gemengd, om het op veel wittere Chinees porselein te laten lijken. Bij het bakken van faience en porselein wordt gebruikgemaakt van cassettes, om het eindproduct te beschermen tegen roet. Bij faience is ook de onderkant tingeglazuurd. De techniek van het maken van het fijnere faience kwam via Antwerpen naar Noord-Nederland.

In Delft werd aanvankelijk majolica geproduceerd, maar de pottenbakkers gingen over tot het maken van faience in het midden van de 17e eeuw.

 Historische bron

De vroegste, in Europa bekende bron over majolica werd geschreven tussen 1556 en 1559 door de Italiaanse pottenbakker Cipriano Piccolpasso uit Castel Durante (nu Urbania) Li tre libri dell’arte del vasaio. Deze verhandeling is vertaald: Cipriano Piccolpasso’s Three Books of the Potter’s Art, Londen 1978

the end @ copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2011

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4 responses to “Pameran Keramik euro Majolica(The Majolica Porcelein Exhibition)

  1. Pingback: MAJOLICA TRAY | Kitchen Appliances & Accessories

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