The Original soundtracks Motion Pictures III(Rekaman Musik Film)

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Frame A : That’s Dancing,MGM Hall wallis Production,composer Henry Mancini

MGM HALL WALLIS FILM That’s Dancing!

COMPOSER HENRY MANCINI

Henry Mancini

Henry Mancini
Birth name Enrico Nicola Mancini
Born April 16, 1924(1924-04-16)
Cleveland, Ohio, United States
Died June 14, 1994(1994-06-14) (aged 70)
Los Angeles, California, United States
Genres Film scores
Occupations Composer, conductor
Instruments Piano

Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994)[1] was an American composer, conductor and arranger, best remembered for his film and television scores. He won a record number of Grammy Awards (20), including a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award posthumously in 1995. His best-known works include the jazz-idiom theme to The Pink Panther film series (“The Pink Panther Theme“), the Peter Gunn Theme from the television series, and back-to-back Academy Awards for the songs “Moon River” from the Blake Edwards film Breakfast at Tiffany’s and “Days of Wine and Roses” from the 1962 film Days of Wine and Roses.

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 Early life

Mancini was born and raised Enrico Nicola Mancini in the Little Italy neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, and grew up near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the steel town of West Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. His parents emigrated from the Abruzzo region of Italy. Mancini’s father, Quinto, was a steelworker, who made his only child begin piccolo lessons at the age of eight.[2] When Mancini was 12 years old, he began piano lessons. Quinto and Henry played flute together in the Aliquippa Italian immigrant band, “Sons of Italy”. After graduating from Aliquippa High School in 1942, Mancini attended the renowned Juilliard School of Music in New York. In 1943, after roughly one year at Juilliard, his studies were interrupted when he was drafted into the United States Army. In 1945, he participated in the liberation of a concentration camp in southern Germany.

 Career

Upon discharge, Mancini entered the music industry. In 1946, he became a pianist and arranger for the newly re-formed Glenn Miller Orchestra, led by Tex Beneke. After World War II, Mancini broadened his composition, counterpoint, harmony and orchestration skills during studies with two acclaimed “serious” concert hall composers, Ernst Krenek and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco.[3]

In 1952, Mancini joined the Universal Pictures music department. During the next six years, he contributed music to over 100 movies, most notably The Creature from the Black Lagoon, It Came from Outer Space, Tarantula, This Island Earth, The Glenn Miller Story (for which he received his first Academy Award nomination), The Benny Goodman Story and Orson WellesTouch of Evil. Mancini left Universal-International to work as an independent composer/arranger in 1958. Soon after, he scored the television series Peter Gunn[2] for writer/producer Blake Edwards, the genesis of a relationship which lasted over 35 years and produced nearly 30 films. Together with Alex North, Elmer Bernstein, Leith Stevens and Johnny Mandel, Henry Mancini was one of the pioneers who introduced jazz music into the late romantic orchestral film and TV scores prevalent at the time.

Mancini’s scores for Blake Edwards included Breakfast at Tiffany’s (with the standard “Moon River“)[2] and Days of Wine and Roses (with the title song, “Days of Wine and Roses“), as well as Experiment in Terror, The Pink Panther (and all of its sequels), The Great Race, The Party, and Victor Victoria. Another director with whom Mancini had a longstanding partnership was Stanley Donen (Charade, Arabesque, Two for the Road). Mancini also composed for Howard Hawks (Man’s Favorite Sport?, Hatari! — which included the well-known “Baby Elephant Walk“), Martin Ritt (The Molly Maguires), Vittorio de Sica (Sunflower), Norman Jewison (Gaily, Gaily), Paul Newman (Sometimes a Great Notion, The Glass Menagerie), Stanley Kramer (Oklahoma Crude), George Roy Hill (The Great Waldo Pepper), Arthur Hiller (Silver Streak),[4] Ted Kotcheff (Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?), and others. Mancini’s score for the Alfred Hitchcock film Frenzy (1972) was rejected and replaced by Ron Goodwin‘s work.

Mancini scored many TV movies, including The Thorn Birds and The Shadow Box. He wrote his share of television themes, including Mr. Lucky (starring John Vivyan and Ross Martin), NBC News Election Night Coverage, NBC Mystery Movie,[5] What’s Happening!!,[6] Newhart, Remington Steele, Tic Tac Dough (1990 version)[citation needed] and Hotel. Mancini also composed the “Viewer Mail” theme for Late Night with David Letterman.[5] Lawrence Welk held Mancini in very high regard, and frequently featured Mancini’s music on The Lawrence Welk Show (Mancini, at least once, made a guest appearance on the show).

Mancini recorded over 90 albums, in styles ranging from big band to classical to pop. Eight of these albums were certified gold by The Recording Industry Association of America. He had a 20 year contract with RCA Records, resulting in 60 commercial record albums that made him a household name composer of easy listening music.

Mancini’s range also extended to orchestral scores (Lifeforce, The Great Mouse Detective, Sunflower, Tom and Jerry: The Movie, Molly Maguires, The Hawaiians), and darker themes (Experiment in Terror, The White Dawn, Wait Until Dark, The Night Visitor).

Mancini was also a concert performer, conducting over fifty engagements per year, resulting in over 600 symphony performances during his lifetime. Among the symphony orchestras he conducted are the London Symphony Orchestra, the Israel Philharmonic, the Boston Pops, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. He appeared in 1966, 1980 and 1984 in command performances for the British Royal Family. He also toured several times with Johnny Mathis and with Andy Williams, who had sung many of Mancini’s songs.[citation needed]

Mancini had experience with acting and voice roles. In 1994, he made a one-off cameo appearance in the first season of the sitcom series Frasier, as a call-in patient to Dr. Frasier Crane’s radio show. Mancini voiced the character Al, who speaks with a melancholy drawl and hates the sound of his own voice, in the episode “Guess Who’s Coming to Breakfast?”[7] Mancini also had an uncredited performance as a pianist in the 1967 movie Gunn, the movie version of the series Peter Gunn, the score of which was originally composed by Mancini himself.

 Death and legacy

Mancini died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He was working at the time on the Broadway stage version of Victor/Victoria, which he never saw on stage. At the time of his death, Mancini was married to his wife of 43 years, singer Virginia “Ginny” O’Connor, with whom he had three children. They’d met while both were members of the Tex Beneke orchestra, just after World War II. In 1948, Ginny was one of the founders of the Society of Singers, a non-profit organization which benefits the health and welfare of professional singers worldwide. Additionally the Society awards scholarships to students pursuing an education in the vocal arts. One of Mancini’s twin daughters, Monica Mancini, is a professional singer; her sister Felice runs The Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation (MHOF). Son Christopher is a music publisher and promoter in Los Angeles.

In 1996, the Henry Mancini Institute, an academy for young music professionals, was founded by Jack Elliott in Mancini’s honor, and was later under the direction of composer-conductor Patrick Williams. By the mid 2000s, however, the institute could not sustain itself and closed its doors on December 30, 2006.[citation needed] However, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Foundation “Henry Mancini Music Scholarship” has been awarded annually since 2001. While still alive, Henry created a scholarship at UCLA and the bulk of his library and works are archived in the highly esteemed music library at UCLA.

In 2005, the Henry Mancini Arts Academy was opened as a division of the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. The Center is located in Midland, Pennsylvania, minutes away from Mancini’s hometown of Aliquippa. The Henry Mancini Arts Academy is an evening-and-weekend performing arts program for children from pre-K to grade 12, with some classes also available for adults. The program includes dance, voice, musical theater, and instrumental lessons.

 Awards

Mancini was nominated for an unprecedented 72 Grammys, winning 20.[8] Additionally he was nominated for 18 Academy Awards, winning four.[9] He also won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for two Emmys.

Mancini won a total of four Oscars for his music in the course of his career. He was first nominated for an Academy Award in 1955 for his original score of The Glenn Miller Story, on which he collaborated with Joseph Gershenson. He lost out to Adolph Deutsch and Saul Chaplin‘s Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. In 1962, he was nominated in the Best Music, Original Song category for “Bachelor in Paradise” from the film of the same name, in collaboration with lyricist Mack David. That song did not win. However, Mancini did receive two Oscars that year: one in the same category, for the song “Moon River” (shared with lyricist Johnny Mercer), and one for “Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture” for Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The following year, he and Mercer took another Best Song award for “Days of Wine and Roses“,[2] another eponymous theme song. His next eleven nominations went for naught, but he finally garnered one last statuette working with lyricist Leslie Bricusse on the score for Victor Victoria, which won the “Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score” award for 1983. All three of the films for which he won were directed by Blake Edwards. His score for Victor/Victoria was adapted for the 1995 Broadway musical of the same name.

On April 13, 2004, the United States Postal Service honored Mancini with a 37 cent commemorative stamp. The stamp shows Mancini conducting with a list of some of his most famous movies and TV show themes in the background. The stamp is Scott catalog number 3839.

 Discography

Hit singles

Year Single Peak chart positions
US US
AC
US Country UK[1]
1960 “Mr. Lucky” 21
1961 “Theme from the Great Imposter” 90
“Moon River” 11 1 44
1962 “Theme from Hatari” 95
1963 “Days of Wine and Roses” 33 10
“Banzai Pipeline” 93
“Charade” 36 15
1964 “The Pink Panther Theme” 31 10
“A Shot in the Dark” 97
“Dear Heart” 77 14
“How Soon” 10
1965 “The Sweetheart Tree” 117 23
“Moment to Moment” 27
1966 “Hawaii (Main Theme)” 6
1967 “Two For the Road” 17
“Wait Until Dark” 4
1968 “Norma La De Guadalajara” 21
“A Man, a Horse and a Gun” 36
1969 Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet 1 1
“Moonlight Sonata” 87 15
“There Isn’t Enough to Go Around” 39
1970 “Theme from Z (Life Goes On)” 115 17
“Darling Lili” 26
1971 “Love Story” 13 2
“Theme from Cade’s County” 14 42
1972 “Theme from the Mancini Generation” 38
“All His Children”(with Charley Pride) 117 2
1973 “Oklahoma Crude” 38
1974 “Hangin’ Out”(with the Mouldy Seven) 21
1975 “Once Is Not Enough” 45
1976 “African Symphony” 40
“Slow Hot Wind” 38
1977 “Theme from Charlie’s Angels”” 45 22
1980 “Ravel’s Bolero” 101
1984 “The Thornbirds Theme” 23
“—” denotes a title that did not chart, or was not released in that territory.

Albums

  • The Versatile Henry Mancini, Liberty LRP 3121
  • The Mancini Touch, RCA Victor LSP 2101
  • The Blues & the Beat, RCA Victor LSP-2147
  • Mr. Lucky Goes Latin, RCA Victor LSP-2360
  • Our Man in Hollywood, RCA Victor LSP-2604
  • Uniquely Mancini, RCA Victor LSP-2692
  • The Best of Mancini, RCA Victor LSP-2693
  • Mancini Plays Mancini, RCA Camden CAS-2158
  • Everybody’s Favorite, RCA Camden CXS-9034
  • Concert Sound of Henry Mancini, RCA Victor LSP-2897
  • Dear Heart and Other Songs, RCA Victor LSP-2990
  • Theme Scene, RCA Victor LSP-3052
  • Debut Conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra, RCA Victor LSP-3106
  • The Best of Vol. 3, RCA Victor LSP-3347
  • The Latin Sound of Henry Mancini, RCA Victor LSP-3356
  • A Merry Mancini Christmas, RCA Victor LSP-3612
  • Pure Gold, RCA Victor LSP-3667
  • Mancini Country, RCA Victor LSP-3668
  • Mancini ’67, RCA Victor LSP-3694
  • Music of Hawaii, RCA Victor LSP-3713
  • Brass on Ivory, RCA Victor LSP-3756
  • A Warm Shade of Ivory, RCA Victor LSP-3757
  • Big Latin Band, RCA Victor LSP-4049
  • Six Hours Past Sunset, RCA Victor LSP-4239
  • Theme music from Z & Other Film Music, RCA Victor LSP-4350
  • Big Screen-Little Screen, RCA Victor LSP-4630
  • This Is Henry Mancini, RCA Victor VPS6029
  • Music from the TV Series “The Mancini Generation”, RCA Victor LSP-4689
  • Brass, Ivory & Strings (with Doc Severinsen), RCA APL1-0098
  • The Theme Scene, RCA AQLI-3052
  • Country Gentleman, RCA APD1-0270 (Quadraphonic)
  • Hangin’ Out, RCA CPL1-0672
  • Symphonic Soul, RCA APD1-1025 (Quadraphonic)
  • Mancini’s Angels, RCA CPL1-2290
  • (with Johnny Mathis), The Hollywood Musicals, Columbia FC 40372
  • The Pink Panther Meets Speedy Gonzales, Koch Schwann CD
  • The Legendary Henry Mancini, BMG Australia 3 CD set

 Soundtracks

Many of Mancini’s “soundtracks” are actually “Music from …”, which allowed him to rearrange the music to be more accessible and to release records without the expense of paying studio orchestra fees.

 Filmography

That’s Dancing!

Promotional movie poster for the film
Directed by Jack Haley Jr.
Produced by Jack Haley Jr.
David Niven Jr.
Written by Jack Haley Jr.
Starring Gene Kelly
Liza Minnelli
Mikhail Baryshnikov
Sammy Davis Jr.
Ray Bolger
Music by Henry Mancini
Distributed by MGM
Release date(s) January 18, 1985 (U.S. release)
Running time 105 min.
Language English
Preceded by That’s Entertainment, Part II
Followed by That’s Entertainment! III

That’s Dancing! (1985) is a retrospective documentary produced by MGM that looked back at the history of dancing in film. Unlike the That’s Entertainment! series, this film did not focus specifically on MGM films and included more recent performances by the likes of John Travolta (from Saturday Night Fever) and Michael Jackson and from the then-popular films Fame (1980) and Flashdance (1983), as well as classic films from other studios, including Carousel, released by 20th Century Fox, and Oklahoma!, released by Magna Corporation (roadshow) and 20th Century Fox (general release).

A highlight of the film was the first theatrical release of a complete dance routine by Ray Bolger for his “If I Only Had a Brain” number that had been shortened in The Wizard of Oz.

The hosts for this film are Gene Kelly (who also executive produced), Ray Bolger (his last film appearance before his death in 1987), Liza Minnelli, Sammy Davis Jr., and Mikhail Baryshnikov. Pop singer Kim Carnes was commissioned to sing an original song, “Invitation to Dance,” that plays over the closing credits.

This film is sometimes considered part of the That’s Entertainment! series, especially since its starting credits contain a card with the That’s Entertainment! III title (not to be confused with the 1994 film), but even though it shared studio and producers, it is considered a separate production. Jack Haley Jr., who wrote, produced and directed the first That’s Entertainment! film, also wrote and directed this one, co-producing with longtime friend David Niven, Jr.. Haley’s father, Jack Haley, had co-starred with Bolger in Wizard of Oz.

That’s Dancing! was not included when the three That’s Entertainment! films were released on DVD in 2004; it was instead released on its own in 2007. The DVD includes several behind-the-scenes promotional featurettes from 1985 on the making of the film, as well as its accompanying music video featuring Kim Carnes singing “Invitation to Dance” although the DVD omits both the video and song itself.

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 Dedication

This film is dedicated to all dancers …. especially those who devoted their lives to the development of their art long before there was a motion picture camera.

Appearance

Films Featured

Frame B The Eddy Duchin story,music composer Carmen Cavallero.

actor : Gary Grant

Cary Grant

Cary Grant

Grant in 1973, by Allan Warren
Born Archibald Alexander Leach
January 18, 1904(1904-01-18)
Bristol, England
Died November 29, 1986(1986-11-29) (aged 82)
Davenport, Iowa, United States
Other names Archie Leach
Occupation Actor
Years active 1932–1966
Spouse Virginia Cherrill (1934–1935)
Barbara Hutton (1942–1945)
Betsy Drake (1949–1962)
Dyan Cannon (1965–1967)
Barbara Harris (1981–1986)
Partner Maureen Donaldson (1973–1977)[1]
Children Jennifer Grant, born on 26 February 1966 (1966-02-26) (age 44)
Relatives Cary Benjamin Grant, born on 12 August 2008 (2008-08-12) (age 2)
Awards Academy Honorary Award
1970 For his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues.

Archibald Alexander Leach[2] (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986), better known by his stage name Cary Grant, was an English-American actor.[3] With his distinctive yet not quite placeable Mid-Atlantic accent, he was noted as perhaps the foremost exemplar of the debonair leading man: handsome, virile, charismatic, and charming.

He was named the second Greatest Male Star of All Time by the American Film Institute. His popular classic films include She Done Him Wrong (1933), Topper (1937), The Awful Truth (1937), Bringing Up Baby (1938), Gunga Din (1939), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Suspicion (1941), The Talk of the Town (1942), Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), Notorious (1946), Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948), To Catch A Thief (1955), An Affair to Remember (1957), North by Northwest (1959), and Charade (1963).

Nominated twice for the Academy Award for Best Actor and five times for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor, he missed out every time until he was finally honored with an Honorary Award at the 42nd Academy Awards “for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues”.

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Early life and career

Archibald Alexander Leach was born in Horfield, Bristol, to Elsie Maria Kingdon (1877–1973) and Elias James Leach (1873–1935).[4][5] An only child, he had an unhappy childhood, attending Bishop Road Primary School. His mother had suffered from depression since the death of a previous child. Her husband placed her in a mental institution, and told his nine-year-old son only that she had gone away on a “long holiday”; it was not until he was 31[6] that Grant discovered her alive, in an institutionalized care facility.

He was expelled from the Fairfield Grammar School in Bristol in 1918. After joining the “Bob Pender stage troupe”, Leach performed as a stilt walker and travelled with the group to the United States in 1920 at the age of 16, on a two-year tour of the country. He was processed at Ellis Island on July 28, 1920.[7] When the troupe returned to the UK, he decided to stay in the U.S. and continue his stage career. During this time, he became a part of the vaudeville world and toured with Parker, Rand and Leach. (After departing the troupe, a young James Cagney briefly replaced him.) Still using his birth name, he performed on the stage at The Muny in St. Louis, Missouri, in such shows as Irene (1931); Music in May (1931); Nina Rosa (1931); Rio Rita (1931); Street Singer (1931); The Three Musketeers (1931); and Wonderful Night (1931). Leach experience on stage as a stilt walker, acrobat, juggler, and mime taught him “phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing” and the value of teamwork, skills which would benefit him in Hollywood.[6]

Hollywood stardom

After some success in light Broadway comedies he went to Hollywood in 1931,[6] where he acquired the name Cary Lockwood. He chose the name Lockwood after the surname of his character in a recent play called Nikki. He signed with Paramount Pictures, but while studio bosses were impressed with him, they were less than impressed with his adopted stage name. They decided that the name Cary was acceptable, but Lockwood had to go due to a similarity with another actor’s name. It was after browsing through a list of the studio’s preferred surnames, that “Cary Grant” was born. Grant chose the name because the initials C and G had already proved lucky for Clark Gable and Gary Cooper, two of Hollywood’s biggest movie stars.

Already having appeared as leading man opposite Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus (1932), his stardom was given a further boost by Mae West when she chose him for her leading man in two of her most successful films, She Done Him Wrong and I’m No Angel (both 1933).[8] I’m No Angel was a tremendous financial success and, along with She Done Him Wrong, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, saved Paramount from bankruptcy. Paramount put Grant in a series of unsuccessful films until 1936, when he signed with Columbia Pictures. His first major comedy hit was when he was loaned to Hal Roach‘s studio for the 1937 Topper (which was distributed by MGM).

Under the tutelage of director Leo McCarey, his role in The Awful Truth (1937) with Irene Dunne was the pivotal film in the establishment of Grant’s screen persona; as he later wrote, “I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be and I finally became that person. Or he became me. Or we met at some point.” The Awful Truth began “what would be the most spectacular run ever for an actor in American pictures”;[6] during the next four years, Grant made the screwball comedy Bringing Up Baby and the romance Holiday (1938) with Katharine Hepburn; the adventures Gunga Din and Only Angels Have Wings (1939); His Girl Friday (1940) with Rosalind Russell; The Philadelphia Story (1940), with Hepburn and James Stewart; and Suspicion (1941), the first of four with Alfred Hitchcock.

Grant remained one of Hollywood’s top box-office attractions for almost 30 years.[6] Howard Hawks said that Grant was “so far the best that there isn’t anybody to be compared to him”.[9] David Thomson called him “the best and most important actor in the history of the cinema“.[6]

as John Robie in Alfred Hitchcock‘s
To Catch a Thief (1955)

Grant was a favorite of Hitchcock, who called him “the only actor I ever loved in my whole life”.[10] Besides Suspicion, Grant appeared in the Hitchcock classics Notorious (1946), To Catch a Thief (1955) and North by Northwest (1959). Biographer Patrick McGilligan wrote that, in 1965, Hitchcock asked Grant to star in Torn Curtain (1966), only to learn that Grant had decided to retire after making one more film, Walk, Don’t Run (1966); Paul Newman was cast instead, opposite Julie Andrews.[11]

In the mid-1950s, Grant formed his own production company, Grantley Productions, and produced a number of movies distributed by Universal, such as Operation Petticoat (1959), Indiscreet (1958), That Touch of Mink (co-starring with Doris Day, 1962), and Father Goose (1964). In 1963, he appeared opposite Audrey Hepburn in Charade (1963). His last feature film was Walk, Don’t Run (1966) with Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton.

Grant was the first actor to “go independent” by not renewing his studio contract, effectively leaving the studio system,[6] which almost completely controlled what an actor could or could not do. In this way, Grant was able to control every aspect of his career, at the risk of not working because no particular studio had an interest in his career long term. He decided which movies he was going to appear in, he often had personal choice of the directors and his co-stars and at times even negotiated a share of the gross, something uncommon at the time.

Grant was nominated for two Academy Awards in the 1940s, and received a special Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1970. In 1981, he was accorded the Kennedy Center Honors. Never self absorbed, Grant poked fun at himself with statements such as, “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant—even I want to be Cary Grant”.[12] After receiving a telegram from a magazine editor asking “HOW OLD CARY GRANT?” Grant was reported to have responded with “OLD CARY GRANT FINE. HOW YOU?”[13]

Retirement and death

Statue of Cary Grant in Millennium Square, Bristol, England

Although Grant had retired from the screen, he remained active in other areas. In the late 1960s, he accepted a position on the board of directors at Fabergé. By all accounts this position was not honorary, as some had assumed, Grant regularly attended meetings and his mere appearance at a product launch would almost certainly guarantee its success. The position also permitted use of a private plane, which Grant could use to fly to see his daughter wherever her mother, Dyan Cannon, was working. He later joined the boards of Hollywood Park, Western Airlines (now Delta Air Lines), and MGM.[14]

In the last few years of his life, Grant undertook tours of the United States in a one-man show. It was called “A Conversation with Cary Grant”, in which he would show clips from his films and answer audience questions. Grant was preparing for a performance at the Adler Theater in Davenport, Iowa on the afternoon of November 29, 1986 when he sustained a cerebral hemorrhage. He had previously suffered a stroke in October 1984. He died at 11:22 pm [14] in St. Luke’s Hospital.

In 2001 a statue of Grant was erected in Millennium Square, a regenerated area next to the harbour in his city of birth, Bristol, England.

In November 2004, Grant was named “The Greatest Movie Star of All Time” by Premiere Magazine.[15] Richard Schickel, the film critic, said about Grant: “He’s the best star actor there ever was in the movies.”[16]

Personal life

Grant was married five times, and was dogged by rumors that he was bisexual. He wed Virginia Cherrill on February 10, 1934. She divorced him on March 26, 1935, following charges that Grant had hit her. In 1942 he married Barbara Hutton, one of the wealthiest women in the world, and became a father figure to her son, Lance Reventlow. The couple was derisively nicknamed “Cash and Cary”, although in an extensive prenuptial agreement Grant refused any financial settlement in the event of a divorce. After divorcing in 1945, they remained lifelong friends. Grant always bristled at the accusation that he married for money: “I may not have married for very sound reasons, but money was never one of them.”

On December 25, 1949, Grant married Betsy Drake. He appeared with her in two films. This would prove to be his longest marriage, ending on August 14, 1962. Drake introduced Grant to LSD, and in the early 1960s he related how treatment with the hallucinogenic drug —legal at the time— at a prestigious California clinic had finally brought him inner peace after yoga, hypnotism, and mysticism had proved ineffective.[17][18][19] The couple divorced in 1962.

He eloped with Dyan Cannon on July 22, 1965 in Las Vegas. Their daughter, Jennifer Grant, was born prematurely on February 26, 1966. He frequently called her his “best production” and regretted that he had not had children sooner. The marriage was troubled from the beginning and Cannon left him in December 1966, claiming that Grant flew into frequent rages and spanked her when she “disobeyed” him. The divorce, finalized in 1968, was bitter and public, and custody fights over their daughter went on for nearly ten years.

On April 11, 1981, Grant married long-time companion British hotel public relations agent Barbara Harris, who was 47 years his junior. They renewed their vows on their fifth wedding anniversary. Fifteen years after Grant’s death Harris married former Kansas Jayhawks All-American quarterback David Jaynes in 2001.[20]

Grant allegedly was involved with costume designer Orry-Kelly when he first moved to Manhattan,[21] and lived with Randolph Scott off and on for twelve years. Richard Blackwell wrote that Grant and Scott were “deeply, madly in love”,[22] and alleged eyewitness accounts of their physical affection have been published.[21] Hedda Hopper [23] and screenwriter Arthur Laurents also have alleged that Grant was bisexual, the latter writing that Grant “told me he threw pebbles at my window one night but was luckless”.[24] Alexander D’Arcy, who appeared with Grant in The Awful Truth, said he knew that he and Scott “lived together as a gay couple”, adding: “I think Cary knew that people were saying things about him. I don’t think he tried to hide it.”[21] The two men frequently accompanied each other to parties and premieres and were unconcerned when photographs of them cozily preparing dinner together at home were published in fan magazines.[21]

Barbara, Grant’s widow, has disputed that there was a relationship with Scott.[14] When Chevy Chase joked about Grant being gay in a television interview Grant sued him for slander; they settled out of court.[25] However, Grant did admit in an interview that his first two wives had accused him of being homosexual.[25] Betsy Drake commented: “Why would I believe that Cary was homosexual when we were busy fucking? Maybe he was bisexual. He lived 43 years before he met me. I don’t know what he did.”[14]

actres: Kim Novak

Kim Novak

Kim Novak

Novak in 2004
Born Marilyn Pauline Novak
February 13, 1933 (1933-02-13) (age 77)
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Years active 1954–1991
Spouse Richard Johnson (1965–1966)
Dr. Robert Malloy (1976–present)

Kim Novak (born February 13, 1933) is an American retired actress. She is best known for her performance in the 1958 film Vertigo. Novak retired from acting in 1991 and has since become an accomplished artist of oil paintings.[1] She lives with her veterinarian husband on a ranch in Eagle Point, Oregon, where they raise livestock.[2]

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Early life

Kim Novak was born Marilyn Pauline Novak in Chicago, Illinois, to Joseph Novak and Blanche Marie Novak (nee Král). Her parents were second-generation Czech immigrants. Her father was a railroad clerk and former teacher and her mother was also a former teacher.

While attending David Glasgow Farragut High School, she won a scholarship to the Art Institute of Chicago. After leaving school, she began a career modeling teen fashions for a local department store. She later received a scholarship at a modeling academy and continued to model part-time. She worked as an elevator operator, a sales clerk and a dental assistant.

After a job touring the country as a spokesman for a refrigerator manufacturer, “Miss Deepfreeze,” Novak moved to Los Angeles, where she continued to find work as a model.[3]

Career

The 20-year-old actress began with an uncredited role in The French Line (1954). Eventually, she was seen by a Columbia Pictures talent agent and filmed a screen test. Novak was signed to a six-month contract, and the studio changed her first name to Kim. Novak debuted as Lona McLane that same year in Pushover opposite Fred MacMurray and Philip Carey, and played the femme fatale role of Janis in Phffft! opposite Judy Holliday, Jack Lemmon, and Jack Carson. Novak’s reviews were good . People were eager to see the new star, and she received an enormous amount of fan mail .

Kim Novak singing “My Funny Valentine‘ in Pal Joey)

After playing Madge Owens in Picnic (1955) opposite William Holden, Novak won a Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer and for World Film Favorite. She was also nominated for the British BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actress. That same year she played Molly in The Man with the Golden Arm with Frank Sinatra. In 1957 she worked with Sinatra again for Pal Joey, which also starred Rita Hayworth, and starred in Jeanne Eagels with Jeff Chandler. She was on the cover of the July 29, 1957, issue of Time Magazine. That same year, she went on strike, protesting her salary of $1,250 per week.

In 1958, Novak starred in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed classic thriller Vertigo, playing the roles of a brunette shopgirl, Judy Barton, and a blonde woman named Madeleine Elster.

Today, the film is considered a masterpiece of romantic suspense, though Novak’s performance has received mixed reviews. Critic David Shipman thought it “little more than competent”,[4] while David Thomson sees it as “one of the major female performances in the cinema”.[5] Hitchcock, rarely one to praise actors, dismissed Novak in a later interview. “You think you’re getting a lot,” he said of her ability, “but you’re not.”[citation needed]

Kim Novak in Vertigo

That same year, she again starred alongside Stewart in Bell, Book and Candle, a comedy tale of modern-day witchcraft that did moderately well at the box office. In 1960, she co-starred with Kirk Douglas in the critically acclaimed Strangers When We Meet also featuring Walter Matthau and Ernie Kovacs. In 1962, Novak produced her own movie, financing her own production company in association with Filmways Productions. Boys’ Night Out, in which she starred with James Garner and Tony Randall. It was received mildly well by critics and the public. She was paired with Lemmon for a third and final time that year in a mystery-comedy, The Notorious Landlady.

In 1964 she played the vulgar waitress Mildred Rogers in a remake of W. Somerset Maugham‘s drama Of Human Bondage opposite Laurence Harvey, and starred as barmaid Polly, “The Pistol” in Billy Wilder‘s Kiss Me, Stupid with Ray Walston and Dean Martin. After playing the title role in The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965) with Richard Johnson, Novak took a break from Hollywood acting. She continued to act, although infrequently, taking fewer roles as she began to prefer personal activities over acting[6][7]

Her comeback came in a dual role as a young actress, Elsa Brinkmann, and an early-day movie goddess who was murdered, Lylah Clare, in producer-director Robert Aldrich‘s The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968) with Peter Finch and Ernest Borgnine for MGM. The movie did not do well . After playing a forger, Sister Lyda Kebanov, in The Great Bank Robbery (1969) opposite Zero Mostel, Clint Walker, and Claude Akins, she stayed away from the screen for another four years. She then played the role of Auriol Pageant in the horror anthology film Tales That Witness Madness (1973) opposite Joan Collins. She starred as veteran showgirl Gloria Joyce in the made-for-TV movie The Third Girl From the Left (1973), and played Eva in Satan’s Triangle (1975). She was featured in the 1977 western The White Buffalo with Charles Bronson, and in 1979 she played Helga in Just a Gigolo co-starring David Bowie.

In 1980, Novak played Lola Brewster in the mystery/thriller The Mirror Crack’d, based on the story by Agatha Christie and co-starring Angela Lansbury, Tony Curtis, Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor. She and Taylor portrayed rival actresses. She made occasional television appearances over the years. She co-starred with James Coburn in the TV-movie Malibu (1983) and played Rosa in a revival of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1985) opposite Melanie Griffith. From 1986 to 1987, the actress was a cast member of the television series Falcon Crest during its fourth season, playing the mysterious character Kit Marlowe (the stage name rejected at the start of her career). She co-starred with Ben Kingsley in the 1990 film The Children.

Her most recent appearance on the big screen to date came as a terminally ill writer with a mysterious past in the thriller Liebestraum (1991), opposite Kevin Anderson and Bill Pullman. However, owing to battles with the director over how to play the role, her scenes were cut . Novak later admitted in a 2004 interview that the film was a mistake. She said

“I got so burned out on that picture that I wanted to leave the business, but then if you wait long enough you think, ‘Oh, I miss certain things.’ The making of a movie is wonderful. What’s difficult is afterward when you have to go around and try to sell it. The actual filming, when you have a good script—which isn’t often—nothing beats it.”

.[8]

In an interview with Stephen Rebello in the July 2005 issue of Movieline’s Hollywood Life, Novak admitted that she had been “unprofessional” in her conduct with the film’s director, Mike Figgis .

Novak has not ruled out further acting. In an interview in 2007, she said that she would consider returning to the screen “if the right thing came along.”[9]

Novak appeared for a question-and-answer session about her career on July 30, 2010, at the Egyptian Theatre in Los Angeles, where the American Cinematheque hosted a tribute to her coinciding with the August 3 DVD release of “The Kim Novak Collection.”[10]

Honors

For her contribution to motion pictures, Novak was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 6332 Hollywood Boulevard.

In 1995, Novak was ranked 92nd by Empire Magazine on a list of the 100 sexiest stars in film history. In 1955, she won the Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer-Female. In 1957, she won another Golden Globe–for World Favorite female actress. In 1997, Kim won an Honorary Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival. In 2002 a Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Novak by Eastman Kodak.

In 2005, British fashion designer Alexander McQueen named his first It bag the Novak.[11]

Personal life

Novak has been married to veterinarian Dr. Robert Malloy (born 1940) since March 12, 1976. The couple resides on a ranch where they raise horses and llamas. Novak has two stepchildren.[12]

Novak was previously married to English actor Richard Johnson from March 15, 1965, to April 23, 1966. The two have remained friends . Novak dated Sammy Davis, Jr., in the late 1950s and actor Michael Brandon in the 1970s.[13][14] She was engaged to director Richard Quine in the early 1960s.[15]

On July 24, 2000, her home in Eagle Point, Oregon, was partially destroyed by fire.[16] Novak lost scripts, several paintings, and a computer containing the only draft of her unfinished autobiography.[16] Of the loss Novak said:

“I take it personally as a sign that maybe I’m not supposed to write my biography; maybe the past is supposed to stay buried. It made me realize then what was really valuable. That’s the day I wrote a gratitude list. We’re safe and our animals are safe.”[16]

In December 2001, her home in Oregon was robbed of more than $200,000 worth of firearms and tools. Three men were arrested and charged with burglary, theft, and criminal conspiracy.[17]

In 2006, Novak was injured in a horseback riding accident. She suffered a punctured lung, broken ribs, and nerve damage but made a full recovery within a year.[9]

Novak is an artist who paints in watercolor and oil as well as creating sculpture, stained glass design, poetry, and photography.[18]

In October 2010, it was reported that Novak had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to her manager, Sue Cameron. Cameron also noted that Novak is “undergoing treatment” and that “her doctors say she is in fantastic physical shape and should recover very well.” [19]

Eddy Duchin

Eddy Duchin (April 1, 1909 or April 10, 1910 – February 9, 1951) was an American popular pianist and bandleader of the 1930s and 1940s, famous for his engaging onstage personality, his elegant piano style, and his fight against leukemia.

Contents

 

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Early career

Edwin Frank Duchin was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Sources are divided as to whether his birth occurred on 1 April 1909 or 10 April 1910. He first became a pharmacist before turning full-time to music and beginning his new career with Leo Reisman’s orchestra at the Central Park Casino in New York, an elegant nightclub where he became hugely popular in his own right and eventually became the Reisman orchestra’s leader by 1932. He became widely popular thanks to regular radio broadcasts that boosted his record sales, and he was one of the earliest pianists to lead a commercially successful large band.

 Musical style

Playing what later came to be called “sweet” music rather than jazz, Duchin’s success opened a new gate for similarly styled, piano-playing sweet bandleaders such as Henry King, Joe Reichman, Nat Brandwynne, Dick Gasparre, Little Jack Little, and particularly Carmen Cavallaro (who acknowledged Duchin’s influence) to compete with the large jazz bands for radio time and record sales.

Eddy Duchin on the cover of his album Talk of the Town

Duchin had no formal music training—which was said to frustrate his musicians at times—but he developed a style rooted in classical music that some saw as the forerunner of Liberace‘s ornate, gaudy approach. Still, there were understatements in Duchin’s music. By no means was Duchin a perfect pianist, but he was easy to listen to without being rote or entirely predictable. He was a pleasing stage presence whose favourite technique was to play his piano cross-handed, using only one finger on the lower hand, and he was respectful to his audiences and to his classical influences.

Duchin would often use beautiful, soft-voiced singers such as Durelle Alexander and Lew Sherwood to accommodate his sweet and romantic songs, giving them extra appeal and making them more interesting.

Notoriety

Duchin’s 1938 release of the Louis Armstrong song “Ol’ Man Mose” (Brunswick Records 8155) with vocal by Patricia Norman caused a minor scandal at the time with the lyric “bucket” being heard as “fuck it.” Some listeners have analyzed the recording and concluded that there is no vulgarism uttered, while others are convinced that Norman does say “fuck” (which would explain one of the band members laughing delightedly after Norman seems to chirp, “Aww, fuck it, fuck-fuck-fuck it!”).

The “scandalous” lyrics caused the record to zoom to #2 on the Billboard charts, resulting in sales of 170,000 copies when sales of 20,000 were considered a blockbuster. The song was banned after its release in Great Britain. The notorious number can be heard on a British novelty CD, Beat the Band to the Bar.

Late career and death

Duchin entered the U.S. Navy during World War II, serving as a combat officer in a destroyer squadron in the Pacific.[1] He attained the rank of lieutenant commander (O4). After his discharge from the military, Duchin was unable to reclaim his former stardom in spite of a stab at a new radio show in 1949.

On February 9, 1951, Eddy Duchin died at age 41 in New York City of acute myelogenous leukemia. He was cremated, and his ashes were scattered in the Atlantic Ocean.

Legacy

By the mid 1950s, Columbia Pictures, having enjoyed success with musical biographies, mounted a feature film based on the bandleader’s life. The Eddy Duchin Story (1956) is a fictionalized tearjerker, with Tyrone Power in the title role. The film did well in theaters, and was well enough known to be referenced in one of Columbia’s Three Stooges shorts: the Stooges’ spaceship is about to crash when Joe Besser yelps, “I don’t want to die! I can’t die! I haven’t seen The Eddy Duchin Story yet!”

An anthology of some of Duchin’s best recordings, Dancing with Duchin, was released in 2002.

Duchin’s had one child, Peter Duchin (b. 1937), with his first wife, Marjorie Oelrichs). Peter had begun a musical education with his father and eventually later studied formally at Yale. In time, he became an orchestra-leading pianist in his own right, as well as the author of a series of mystery novels, a presence in high society (into which his mother had been born), and a frequent entertainer (as well as musical director for U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson‘s inauguration) at the White House and on television. In his 1996 memoir Ghost of a Chance, Peter Duchin wrote about the wholesale fictionalization in The Eddy Duchin Story. Peter Duchin has been married to actress/writer Brooke Hayward (daughter of agent and theatrical producer Leland Hayward and actress Margaret Sullavan), since 1985.

  • Born: 1912
  • Died: 1989
  • Occupation: Actor
  • Active: ’40s
  • Major Genres: Musical, Comedy

Biography

Pianist and some-time composer Carmen Cavallaro has been called “The Poet of the Piano” and is known for taking classical standards and arranging them as pop tunes. One of his biggest hits was “Chopin’s Polonaise” (1945). He began his career leading a dance-band in St. Louis. He also toured hotels and nightclubs all over the U.S. and in the ’40s hosted The Schaeffer Parade, a radio show. During the ’40s, Cavallara also appeared in such films as Hollywood Canteen (1944). In 1956, he played the piano soundtrack for The Eddy Duchin Story. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

 

 

 

 

the end @ copyright dr Iwan Suwandy 2011

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2 responses to “The Original soundtracks Motion Pictures III(Rekaman Musik Film)

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