The Vintage Asia Artwork Collections Part Two

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE VINTAGE ASIA ARTWORK COLLECTIONS PART TWO

The  Collection of Asian Art & Fine Japanese Works of Art

 

“The Way of the Master – The Great Artists of India, 1100–1900” @ Museum Rietberg in Zurich

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Self-Portrait and Portraits of Artists (detail) By Daulat, Mughal, c. 1610 © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

800 years of Indian painting, about 200 masterpieces by more than 40 artists – and all this at a glance. Never before has it been possible in the West to acquaint oneself with the entire history of Indian painting at a single exhibition.

The inventiveness and colour sense of artists such as Abd al-Samad, Farrukh Beg or Nainsukh are as impressive as their names are exotic. Acclaimed by their contemporaries as “wonders of the age”, they can without hesitation be compared to Dürer, Michelangelo or Vermeer. It therefore comes as no surprise that Rembrandt also assembled a collection of Indian miniatures.

Supported by Novartis and the Schwyzer Foundation

From September 2011, this exhibition will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

1 May – 21 August 2011. Museum Rietberg Zurich

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Akbar Presents a Painting to His Father Humayun. By ‘Abd al-Samad. Mughal, probably Kabul, c. 1550–1556. © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

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Self-Portrait and Portraits of Artists By Daulat, Mughal, c. 1610 © Golestan Palace Library, Tehran. Photo: Davood Sadeghsa

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Prince Salim Enthroned. By Manohar (Portrait) and Mansur (Throne). Mughal, dated 1600/01 © The Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 2011

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Krishna playing Blindman’s Bluff. By Manaku. Pahari region, Guler, c. 1750 © The Kronos Collections

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Dialectica. By Abu’l Hasan. Overpainted engraving by Marten des Vos, after Jan Sadeler. Mughal, c. 1602/03 © The Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 2011

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Ram Singh I of Kota Pursuing a Rhinoceros. Attributed to a Kota master. Rajasthan, Kota, c. 1700 © Private Collection

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Rawat Gokul Das at a Hunting Party. By Bagta. Rajasthan, Mewar, Devgarh, dated 1808 © Trustees, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai (Formerly Prince of Wales Museum of Western India)

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Shiva, Solicitous of his Other Half. By Devidasa. Pahari region, Basohli, dated 1695 © San Diego Museum of Art

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Rupmati and Baz Bahadur Hunting. Attributed to the First Bahu Master. Pahari region, Bahu, c. 1700 © Museum Rietberg Zürich, long-term loan Barbara and Eberhard Fischer. Photo: Rainer Wolfsberger

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Chameleon. By Mansur. Mughal, c. 1595–1600. Royal Collection © 2011 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota Contemplating a Painting with the Painter Nainsukh. Attributed to Nainsukh. Pahari region, Jasrota, c. 1745–1750 © Museum Rietberg Zürich. Photo: Rainer Wolfsberger

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Ascetics in the Dandaka Forrest. Master of the First Generation after Nainsukh and Manaku. Pahari region, Kangra/Guler, c. 1780 © Museum Rietberg Zürich,

Thousand Years of the Persian Book of Kings @ Museum of Islamic Art Berlin

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Der Held Sam holt seinen. Sohn Zal vom Berg Alborz zurück. Tabriz, um 1530. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 5/82 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

BERLIN.- UNESCO has designated the year 2010 as Millennium year of the Shahname. The Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin and the Berlin National Library are seizing the opportunity to introduce this literary masterpiece to the public with their world-renowned collections of Shahname manuscripts and miniature paintings. The exhibition, on view from March 19 through July 3, 2011, communicates the history of the epic and its literary highlights, as well as the important role the Shahname for Persian national identity.

The National Epic Shahnameh by the poet Ferdausi is one of the great works of world literature. In nearly 50,000 verses, it recounts a partly mythical, partly historical past of the Iranian people right up to the Islamic conquest of Persia.

Legendary are the stories of its famous kings and heroes, especially of Rustam who so fearlessly defended the Persian kingdom in many spectacular battles against the hostile Turanians from the North. The epic also relates the important features of ideal kingship. It narrates the battle between Good and Evil, and is a constant reminder that Life is just a transitory memento. Ancient Kings of Persia figure in prominently, like Shah Ardashir I, the founder of the Sasanian Dynasty (224-239/40) or Shah Bahram V Gur, the fourteenth Sassanid King (421-438): Historical figures transformed by poetic imagination into quasi-mystical figures transformed by poetic imagination into quasi-mystical heroes. The exhibition thus confronts archaeology of these periods with the stories of those figures both historical and heroic, and sometimes mythical in the Shahnameh.

Beside a thematic show of the Shahnameh ‘through the ages’ with masterpieces of Persian painting, the exhibition presents the rich and extremely rare Sasanian collection of the Museum of Islamic Art thus illuminating the important historical past of the mythical legend.

The exhibition includes around 50 manuscripts and folios from the Keir Collection, the National Library, and the Museum of Islamic Art (amongst others the world famous folios from the yet far too little known Diez-Albums, the Great Mongol Shahnameh and the Shah Tahmasp Shahnameh) as well as medieval ceramics, textiles, metalwork and weapons plus artifacts from the Sasanian collection. These artworks are supplemented by important loans from the Berlin Museum of Asian Arts, the Berlin Museum of Ethnology and the Deutsche Historische Museum (DHM) and loans from two German private collections.

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Der Dichter Ferdausi trägt Sultan Mahmud aus dem. Schahname vor. Tabriz, um 1530. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 5/77 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

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Der mythische Köng Dschamschid lehrt die Menschen das Schmieden und Schneidern Schiraz, 823/1420. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4628, S. 12 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: I. Geske

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Prinz Siyavosch besteht die Feuerprobe. West Iran, 1390–1410. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Diez A fol. 71, S. 27 © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Sasanidische Jagdschale. Iran, 7. Jh. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4925 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Foto: J. Anders

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Pferdekopf einer lebensgroßen Reiterdarstellung.. Nizamabad, 7.–1. Hälfte 8. Jh. Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. I. 4886 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Islamische Kunst

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Fliese mit der Darstellung von König Bahram Gur und Fitne. Iran, um 1900. Ethnologisches Museum, Inv.-Nr. I B 4408 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Ethnologisches Museum, Foto: M. Franken

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Rostam ringt mit Puladvand„ Kleines Diez-Schahname“. Isfahan, 1330–1335. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Diez A fol. 71, S. 45, Nr. 3 © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Der Schwarze Div Khazarvan tötet den Thronfolger des ersten Königs. Gayumars, Siyamak. Schiraz, ca. 1560–1570. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Ms. or. fol. 359, Bl. 12b © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Der Div Akvan trägt den schlafenden Rostam fort. Lithographie, Tabriz 1858 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph. Foto: U. Marzolph

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Der Div Akvan trägt den schlafenden. Rostam fort. Lithographie, Tabriz 1858 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph. Foto: U. Marzolph

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Der Wesir offenbart Ardaschir seinen Zustand Einzelblatt aus dem „Großen Mongolischen Schahname“. Tabriz, 1325–1335 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Sammlung Edmund de Unger/Museum für Islamische Kunst, Inv.-Nr. U. 23, Foto: I. Geske

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Haftwad und der Wurm. Aus dem Dschahangir-Album. Indien, datiert 1617/18. Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung, Libri picturati A 117, fol. 14r © Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK, Orientabteilung

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Ahriman (Goebbels), als Koch verkleidet, vor dem Tyrannen Zahhak (Hitler). Die beiden Schlangen, die aus seinen Schultern wachsen, zeigen die Gesichter Mussolinis und Tojos. Antideutsche Kriegsprogandaposter aus Iran während des zweiten Weltkriegs. London (?), 1942 © Privatsammlung U. Marzolph, Foto: U. Marzolph

Treasures from Ancient China III, which will include an exceptional Pan bronze vessel decorated with a snake, from the Shang dynasty (13th-11th century B.C.), and a beautiful three-color glazed horse from the Tang Dynasty (8th century A.D.). 0_

A three-colour Horse, earthenware in sancai glaze, China, Tang Dynasty (618-907). Courtesy Galerie Christian Deydier

Early Chinese Metalwork in Gold and Silver; Works of Art of the Ming and Qing Dynasties is the title of Eskenazi Ltd.’s March exhibition, which will focus on rare and luxurious articles made for emperors, courtiers and scholars and feature exquisitely decorated pieces from the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.). The London-based dealer will show at the Ukrainian Institute, 2 East 79th Street, New York 10075. T (212) 288 8660. 0_

Silver-gilt Melon-shaped bix cover, Tang Dynasty (618-907). Courtesy Eskenazi Ltd

MD Flacks Ltd. of 32 East 57th Street will present Scholar’s Trays, as part of the gallery’s series of exhibitions that concentrates on small treasures and Scholar’s Objects. The show, believed to be the first of its kind in America, will focus on 17 examples of 17th-, 18th- and early 19th-century trays, mainly for use in the Scholar’s Studio as part of the rituals involved with burning incense, drinking tea, calligraphy and painting and thus an essential part of the Scholarly Ideal that was so venerated in China. The variety of treatments of this form offers a wide range of styles, shapes and materials. 0_

Foliate Trays, Huanghuali wood/marble, China, 17th century. Courtesy MD Flacks Ltd

Michael C. Hughes LLC will present Chinese Sculpture & Other Works of Art at Mark Murray Gallery, 39 East 72nd Street, 5th Floor. Two important highlights of this exhibition are a massive, glazed, striding Bactrian camel formerly in the collection of Bernice Richard and an extremely rare, colorful-glazed earth spirit formerly in the Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong. Both date to the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.). 18 – 26 March,  2011. 0_

Massive rare sancai and turquoise-glazed potteru earth spirit, Tang Dynasty, 8th century. Courtesy Michael C. Hughes LLC

Early Chinese Ceramics-Asian Works of Art will be presented by Andrew Kahane, Ltd. at 42 East 76th Street. Featured works will include a Chinese Longquan celadon bowl of the Southern Song Dynasty (late 12th-early 13th century) and an Indonesian gold Kala head from Eastern Java, South Malang in the late Singhasari-early Majapahit Period (13th-early 14th century). Both objects were made for court use, the first in China and the second in Java and come from Buddhist traditions. Indonesian gold Kala head from Eastern Java, South Malang in the late Singhasari-early Majapahit Period (13th-early 14th century). Courtesy Andrew Kahane Ltd

Asian Journeys: Chinese, Japanese and Korean Paintings and Ceramics, accompanied by Kaikodo Journal XXVII, will be shown by Kaikodo at 74 East 79th Street, Suite 14B, featuring Chinese, Japanese and Korean paintings along with a range of ceramics from China, Korea and Vietnam to provide the material for a grand tour through time, space and psyche, where borders might appear flung open and at other times almost impermeable. Items range from 8th-century Korean ceramics and early 13th-century Chinese paintings to 19th-century Japanese works of art. 19 March – 28 April,  2011. 0_

Large Korean Blue-and-White Dragon Jar, Joseon Dynasty, 18th century. Courtesy Kaikodo

J.J. Lally & Co. of 41 East 57th Street will exhibit Ancient Chinese Bronzes, a show of bronze vessels, figures, animals and other works of art made for ritual use or as emblems of power and status in ancient China. The finely cast and inlaid bronzes date from the Shang Dynasty (circa 1500-1050 B.C.) through the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.).

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An Archaic Bronze Taotie Mask, early Western Zhou Dynasty, 10th-9th  c. BC. Courtesy J.J. Lally & Co.

Contemporary Chinese Ink Paintings, Featuring Lotus Paintings by Shi Ze will be shown at M. Sutherland Fine Arts, Ltd., 55 East 80th Street, 2nd Floor. Shi Ze (born 1960, Beijing) first showed at the gallery in 2003. His works now, as then, are fresh and untrammeled views of the important Buddhist symbol of purity, the lotus and uses techniques and materials from traditional Chinese ink, Western oil and Tibetan thanka painting.

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Shi Ze (born 1960, Beijing), Pink Lotus on Blue Background, 2010. Courtesy Sutherland Fine Arts, Ltd

The John Menke Collection of Vietnamese Ceramics will be on view at Zetterquist Galleries, 3 East 66th Street, Suite 1B. The encyclopedic collection from the Dong Son Culture (700-43 B.C.) through the 17th century was assembled over more than 40 years by the eminent scientist, John Menke. Zetterquist Galleries has selected more than 50 pieces for their historical importance and beauty and will offer a rare opportunity to view together 17 centuries of the Vietnamese ceramic tradition. Many of the works in this exhibition have been published in major Vietnamese ceramics books in the U.S. and Europe over the last two decades.

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Four Islands plate, Vietnam, 16th century. Courtesy Zetterquist Galleries

Ralph M. Chait Galleries will also participate in Asia Week New York 2011; exhibition information was unavailable at this writing. Details will be available in the coming weeks. 19 – 26 March,  2011, Mon – Sat    10 – 6pm. 724 Fifth Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10019. T (212) 397 2818 – F (212) 319 0471 –0_

Fine Imperial Chinese Blue and White Mallet Vase (1662-1722). Courtesy Ralph M. Chait Galleries

Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art and Antiques Also among the AADNY exhibitors this year are 15 dealers of Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian art and antiques. Viewers will find a treasure of paintings, textiles, jewels, bronzes and other metal pieces and much more dating from the second century A.D. to the 18th century.

Leiko Coyle Asian Art will exhibit Recent Acquisitions at 311 East 72nd Street, Suite 15E. The show will include an extensive collection of Tibetan thangkas dating from the 14th-19th centuries. Highlights from the collection include an 18th-century, large-scale painting of the Buddha Amitayus commissioned in 1778 by the Qianlong Emperor to honor the visit of the sixth Panchen Lama. Also on view will be three-dimensional works in bronze, wood and stone from Tibet, Nepal, and India.

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Buddha Amitayus, 1779-1780, from the Xumifushou Temple, Chengdu, China. Courtesy Leiko Coyle Asian Art

From the Himalayan Regions: Sculptures, Tangkas and Textiles is the exhibition to be presented by Carlo Cristi of Italy at AFP Galleries, 41 East 57th Street, Suite 702. It will feature fine collections of Tibetan paintings ranging from the 13th-17th centuries, Nepalese and Indian bronzes dating from the 10th-12th centuries and Central Asian textiles dating from the 6th-10th centuries along with needle loop embroideries of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644 A.D.). 09

Wooden tablet painted with Amitabha flanked by boddhisatvas. Tibet, 13th century, wood, pigments. Courtesy Carlo Cristi

Also traveling from Italy is Dalton Somaré from Milan. Early Indo-Buddhist Art will be shown at Pace Gallery, 32 East 57th Street, 7th Floor, and will include very early works of art from the Indian Subcontinent. Among them is an Anthropomorph copper figure from the Gangetic Planes (2nd Millennium B.C.), impressive for its size, as well as several stone images of the Indus Gods Vishnu and Shiva from different periods (6th-11th centuries) from India and Nepal. Also on view will be Himalayan and Indian Buddhist bronzes, including an extremely fine 11th-century Pala Padmapani.

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Manjusti Boddhisatva, Tibet, 15th centuiry. Gilt copper, semiprecious stones,,pigments. Courtesy Dalton Somaré

John Eskenazi Ltd. of London will offer Recent Acquisitions at Adam Williams Fine Art Ltd, 24 East 80th Street. A particular highlight of the show is a charming terracotta fragment of Dancing Shiva from 5th/6thcentury Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, originally part of a rectangular panel that occupied a ghanadvara (solid aperture) on a temple wall. Both joyful and thoughtful, the image is one of the most easily recognized forms in Indian art and, in this early example, Shiva dances for the delight of his fellow gods.

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The birth of Buddha.. Eastern India, 6th century, terracotta. Courtesy John Eskenazi Ltd

Indian Miniature Paintings from the Lloyd Collection will be presented by London-based dealers Oliver Forge & Brendan Lynch Ltd. at 9 East 82nd Street, Suite 1A. The exhibition comprises a remarkable group of 25 Mughal, Rajput and Deccani miniature paintings mainly assembled in the 1970s and ’80s by a private English collector. A number of the most important paintings were acquired at two milestone London exhibitions, at Colnaghi in 1978 and 1979, and others at auction.

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An assembly of royal pigeons round a dovecote. Mughal India, circa 1660. Opaque watercolour with gold on paper. Courtesy Oliver Forge & Brendan Lynch Ltd

Kapoor Galleries will present ‘A Sterling Collection’ of Indian & Himalayan Art at its 1015 Madison Avenue space. The collection, amassed by a private American collector over a 20-year period, contains exquisite examples of Indian miniature painting as well as sculptural masterpieces from India, Nepal & Tibet. The collection consists of 29 Indian paintings and 15 sculptures that were acquired almost exclusively from auctions in New York. 011

Vajradara. Yuan dynasty. Gilt copper with semiprecious stones. Courtesy Kapoor Galleries

Arnold H. Lieberman of 311 East 72nd Street, Suite 6F, will exhibit Recent Acquisitions, an exhibition featuring a large, polychromed wood sculpture of a Chinese Buddhist Abbott, circa 1770; a rare Ninxia skeleton carpet; an elaborate Rajastani shield of painted dahl hide and other distinctive objects primarily from South Asia and the Himalayan regions. 34_A_girl_with_an_Indian_headdress_1_

Lanta. Eastern Tibet or China, 17th or 18th century. Wood with polychrome. Courtesy Arnold H. Lieberman

Exhibition of Jewels from Mughal India and South East Asia will be presented by Sue Ollemans Oriental Art from London, exhibiting this year at Valentina Gallery Inc., 960 Madison Avenue, 2nd Floor, and will feature jewels dating from the 17th 19th centuries and related objects. Along with these will be a collection of jewels from the Deccan and Tamil Nadu in the South of India dating from 12th-20th centuries. Jewels from South East Asia—most importantly Java (dating from 11th-16th centuries07

A gold and ruby Nandi, South Deccan, 17th century or earlier. Courtesy Sue Ollemans Oriental Art

Carlton Rochell Asian Art will offer Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art at its 44 East 74th Street gallery. Featured will be more than 20 sculptures and paintings from India, Tibet, Nepal and Cambodia. These works hail from prestigious private collections in both America and Europe; works range in date from the 2nd century A.D. to the 18th century. 010

Sarasvati. South India. Hoysala dynasty, mid 12th century. Grey chloritic schist. Courtesy Carlton Rochell Asian Art

John Siudmak Asian Art of London will present Indian and Himalayan Sculptures and Thankas from the Collection of the Late Simon Digby at C.G. Boerner Gallery, 23 East 73rd Street. The exhibition of 30 items comes from the leading historian of ancient India, Simon Digby (1932-2010). Highlights will include the bronze and stone sculpture of the Western Himalayas, including Kashmir and Swat, but other parts of north India, particularly the Pala sculpture of Bihar and Bengal, will also be well represented. Many of the sculptures have been published, of which three were exhibited in the recent Asia Society exhibition, The Arts of Kashmir.

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Censer. Courtesy John Siudmak Asian Art of London

Recent Acquisitions of Master Works of Indian and Southeast Asian Art will be presented by Doris Wiener, LLC at 1001 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3C. Among the objects on display will be an important and early Eastern Indian Vishnu stele, an elegant South Indian bronze Jina, Khmer and pre-Khmer sculptures, a selection of Himalayan gilt bronzes and thangkas and a collection of fine Indian miniature paintings.

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Vishnu. India, Bihar, Pre Pala, 6th-7th century. Grey stone. Courtesy Doris Wiener, LLC

Nancy Wiener, exhibiting this year at Trezza Gallery, 39 East 78th Street, Suite 603, will show Indian and Southeast Asian Sculpture, Jewelry, and Works on Paper from 300 BC to the Present. Highlights will include a superb 11th-century Pala Avalokiteshvara; a splendid Khmer necklace, carved from gold in the shape of intertwined jasmine blossoms; as well as a select group of Indian miniature paintings.

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Kumara, India, Rajasthan, 13th century. Black stone. Courtesy Trezza Gallery

Art of the Past will also be exhibiting during Asia Week New York 2011; exhibitions details will be forthcoming.

Korean and Japanese Works of Art and Contemporary Korean and Japanese Rounding out this year’s extraordinary assemblage of exhibitions will include six shows of Korean and Japanese paintings, ceramics, lacquer, netsuke and more spanning from the late 17th century to today.

200 Years of Korean Art: From Classic to Contemporary will be offered at Kang Collection Korean Art, 9 East 82nd Street, Suite 3A, and will feature artworks from classical, 19th-century paintings through today showcasing ink paintings and screens. The show’s focus is on paintings from the tumultuous period of the late 19th/early 20th century in Korea and China that developed out of turbulent politics and yet diligent cultural exchange between Korea and East Asia. The contemporary art will feature, among others, two cutting-edge Korean women painters rooted in the classic traditions of Korean art. 07

KimGyu-Jin, Chrysanthemum and Rocks, late 19th centiry, Joseon dynasty, ink. Courtesy Kang Collection Korean Art

KooNewYork will present its 10th Anniversary Exhibition of Korean Art at Mark Murray Gallery, 39 East 72nd Street, 5th Floor. The exhibition will showcase a wide range of high-quality, Korean antiques from solid provenanced collections and as well as contemporary ceramics and photography. Among the highlights to be shown is a recently discovered, unique, Large Buddhist Pantheon Drawing from the early 18th century with no known comparable examples in the West.

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Chong Son (Kyumjai, 1676-1759), Chungyangsa Temple Amid Diamond Mountains. Courtesy KooNewYork

Birds of Dawn: Pioneers of Japan’s Sôdeisha Ceramic Movement will be on view at Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd., 39 East 78th Street, 4th Floor. An exhibition over 10 years in the making, this show features the Movement’s three founders (Suzuki Osamu, Yagi Kazuo and Yamada Hikaru), who began their careers with original functional work but soon moved to avant-garde sculptural forms that remain as influential today as they were 60 years ago. 07

Suzuki Osamu (1926-2991), Hanayagu tori; Flamboyant bird, 1991. Stoneware with red slip and ashes glazes. Courtesy Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd

Sydney L. Moss Ltd of London will offer an exhibition, Centenary Exhibitions of Japanese Art, including the Elly Nordskog Collection of Inro, devoted to Japanese art at the Alexandre Gallery, 41 East 57th Street, 13th Floor. This will be Moss’ sixth annual New York exhibition and will feature lacquer, inrō, pipecases, netsuke and other works from the collection of the Californian nonagenarian and grande dame of the heyday of Japanese art collecting in Los Angeles, as well as works from the Edo period. 0_

A remarkable Japanese wood sculpture of Oni Nembutsu, Edo period, 18th century. Courtesy Sydney L. Moss Ltd

Scholten Japanese Art, located at 145 East 58th Street, Suite 6D, will present Monogatari: Tales of Japan, an exhibition of paintings, woodblock prints and a selection of netsuke devoted to the art of story-telling. 07

Mano Gyotei (1874-1934), Raijin, ink and color on silk (detail). Courtesy Scholten Japanese Art

Ink, Wood, and Clay: New Selections of Early to Contemporary Japanese Masterworks will be shown by Kyoto-based Hiroshi Yanagi Oriental Art at Arader Galleries, 1016 Madison Avenue, 2nd Floor. Mr. Yanagi has spent the past year assembling more than 40 fresh and interesting pieces especially for this exhibition, particularly of animal subjects and ceramics from Kyoto. Selected Works by Art Students organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art.

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Jizo Bosatsu. Japan, Kamaura period, late 13th century. Hinoki wood. Courtesy Hiroshi Yanagi Oriental Art

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A parcel-gilt silver repousse figure of Padmasambhava in the aspect of Nyima Oser Tibet, 18th century. Pre-sale estimate $60,000-80,000. Photo: Bonhams

NEW YORK, N.Y.- Bonhams is thrilled to participate in New York City’s Asia Week 2011, which brings together a variety of art outlets to celebrate Asian art from China, India, Japan, Korea, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia. Bonhams will highlight this week with two sales on September 13, 2011—The Sartin Collection of Asian Art and Fine Japanese Works of Art.

The Sartin Collection of Asian Art
The Sartin Collection of Asian Art auction comes from the impressive collection of Peter Sartin, a major supporter of the Pacific Asia Museum and one who had an eye for the unusual and rare. Predominantly consisting of Tibetan, Nepalese and Indian art and artifacts, several objects in the sale were included in the Pacific Asia Museum’s landmark exhibition titled “Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life” (2004-2005).

Edward Wilkinson, Bonhams Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art Consultant, states, “This is the most important collection of Tibetan furniture to appear at auction, and combined with the extremely important group of silver works, it presents a wonderful opportunity for connoisseurs and new collectors alike.”

Among this exhibited collection there are several highlights to this sale. Of particular note is a 15th-16th century luminous red painted trunk with two striking “stupas” on the front. In remarkably good condition, this trunk represents the highest standards of Tibetan furniture making, with a pre-sale estimate of $15,000-20,000.

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A storage chest. Tibet, 16th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams

Ground mineral pigments, cloth wood and metal; the tray top with partial remaining decoration of a floral cartouche above a front panel decorated with a deer supported by a large lotus and surrounding leaves within a cusped cartouche. The surrounding flower head trellis pattern is enclosed by gold scrolling form spandrels and similar border. The sides are painted with jeweled offerings. 30 ½ x 11 x 16 ½ in. (77.5 x 27.9 x 41.9 cm.). Estimate: US$10,000 – 15,000
 
Note: As noted in the exhibition catalogue (p. 234) “.. the central cartouche is painted with a mythical animal with a backswept horn resembling Yuan (1279-1368), or earlier, forms of Chinese qilin – or unicorn.Provenance: Acquired from Tony Anninos, San Francisco 2004Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 58, p. 234.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005, no. 58.
 
Greatly important and extremely rare are three 15th-16th century altar tables (estimated at $8,000-12,000, $5,000-8,000 and $4,000-6,000, respectively). These tables each consist of prolific carved aprons and cabriole legs. The detailing exudes the distinctive Tibetan style of power and grace.
 
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An altar table. Tibet, circa 15th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Ground mineral pigments and wood; the plain rectangular top above a foliate carved inset panel frieze and similar deep apron, centered by a precious jewel, raised on elaborate cabriole legs with scrolling floral terminals. 24 ¼ x 10 ½ x 15 in. (61.6 x 26.7 x 38.1 cm.). Estimate: US$8,000 – 12,000
 
Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 9, p. 185.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005.
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An altar table. Tibet, 15th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Wood with traces of pigments; the rectangular top above a heavily carved frieze with five large flower heads raised on short cabriole legs.
21 ½ x 11 x 15 in. (54 x 27.9 x 38.1 cm.). Estimate: US$5,000 – 8,000
 
Provenance: Acquired from Lucca Corona, Kathmandu, Nepal, 2004
 
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An altar table. Tibet, 16th/17th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Wood with traces of pigments; the rectangular inset tray top painted red above a deep frieze with three inset floral cartouches supported by a front panel of carved heavy floral and scrolling forms. 30 x 15 x 20 in. (76.2 x 38.1 x 50.8 cm.). Estimate: US$4,000 – 6,000
Provenance: Acquired from Ian Alsop, Santa Fe, 2004.Published: David Kamansky, editor, Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Chicago, 2004, no. 23, p. 200.Exhibited: Wooden Wonders: Tibetan Furniture in Secular and Religious Life, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA, Nov. 13, 2004 – February 13, 2005.
 
In addition to furniture, is a highly important collection of Tibetan ritual silver objects, some of which are the finest known examples in private hands. One particular highlight, among several, is an 18th century parcel-gilt silver repoussé of figure of Padmasambhava. The Padmasambhava sculpture is a portrait of the historical figure who was responsible for establishing Vajrayana Buddhism in Tibet in the 8th century. He is depicted in the form of Nyima Oser, one of his eight manifestations (est. $60,000-80,000).
 
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A parcel-gilt silver repoussé figure of Padmasambhava in the aspect of Nyima Oser. Tibet, 18th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Inset stones and based seal with original contents; In the appearance of a mahasiddha he gazes directly ahead with a benevolent expression. Adorned with a skull crown around a high topknot, he wears an incised sash across his right shoulder that partially covers a large pectoral secured by four double-beaded bands tied by dorjes . He wears a tiger skin dhoti and is seated on a lotus platform with scalloped leaves. A katvanga staff rests on right left shoulder and the left hand rests in his lap. The right hand is placed across the knee performs a mudra with the index finger extended and would have likely held a lasso. 30 ¾ in. (78 cm.). Estimate: US$60,000 – 80,000
 
Provenance: Sotheby’s, London, June 13 and 14, 1988, lot 106
Collection of Kate Kemper
Christie’s, New York, September 23, 2004, lot 156The identity of this sculpture has been subject to variations over the past twenty years. However, with the presence of the katvanga staff, skull crown and arrangement of the hands this would appear to be certainly a manifestation of Padmasambhava in the form of Nyima Oser.The contents that were used to concecrate the sculture when it was made were revealed when the sculpture was sold by Sotheby’s, London in 1988. Directly after the sale the sculpture was resealed with the contents and it has remained intact since then. The contents are recorded to include a silver prayer wheel, an iron purba, a silver gau box, multiple inscribed and illustrated prayer scrolls, tsa-tsa, mala beads and counters, various cloth fragments and pouches, teeth of venerated lamas, and lengths of human hair identified to owners 
 
In terms of refinement, the silver ritual vase offered in this sale is an ideal representation of great attention to detail with its staggering complex display of skeletal figures, skull bowls and animals associated with the charnel grounds. Because of its rarity, it was most likely kept in a private chapel and only used for specials ceremonies (est. $50,000-80,000).
 
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A ritual offering vase with Smashana Adipati. Tibeto-Chinese, circa 18th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
Raised on a tapered lotus foot, the body of the vase is decorated with scenes of the cremation or charnel grounds between a sea of flames and beaded garlands. Ornamented with various ritual implements including; a flaming sword, ritual axe, and conch as well as birds of prey, and mythical beasts. Scattered in the composition are a variant of the seven gems of the chakravartin including; a coral branch, a pair of elephant tusks, a three-eyed jewel, a unicorn horn, the three gems, crossed pair of measuring rulers, a pair of king’s earrings and a pair of queen’s earrings. The primary elements of the dancing skeletons (chitipat), showing the male holding a skull-tipped scepter and a skull bowl, while the female holds a stalk of grain and a vase. These figures are divided by flaming skull cups, one filled with the five sense offerings, the other filled with nectar and a dragon head at the rim. The projecting ruffled rim and row of skulls support four nagas with raised heads that encircle two bands of water and mountain motifs below a band of kirttimukha, and another with an ocean containing makaras, a man rowing a boat filled with jewels and Chinese style pavilion. The flared rim is supported by a waisted lotus and cloud forms around the broad mouth. 14 in. (35.7 cm.) . Estimate: US$50,000 – 80,000
 
Note: In discussion of Smashana Adipati, lords of the charnel grounds by Linrothe and Watt, Demonic and Devine: Himalayan Art and Beyond, New York, 2004, p. 128 “Smashana Adipati is one of the Sanskrit names for a dancing-skeleton couple who inhabit and preside over the (thus adipati, “lords”) cremations grounds (smashana), where Indian Tantric yoginswere encouraged to practice.”The actual function of this decorated vase is unclear beyond an offering, however the idea of the imagery being associated with their benevolent aspect of protecting wealth is also suggested. Furthermore in their discussion of the connection of Chitipati to the Sakya lineage (ibid, p. 126)”..both figures (Chitipati) consistently hold identical objects in their left and right hands: a skull-or skeleton-tipped scepter and a skull bowl containing swirling blood, respectively. By contrast, the Gelugpa images….usually give the female a stalk of grain and a vase signifying the bestowal of wealth.”The quality of the detailed decoration and powerful imagery place this vase at the peak of metalwork production in Tibet during the 18th century. However, the Qing Emperors were known to be strict followers of the Gelugpa order of Tibetan Buddhism and they constructed many temples in Chende, the summer retreat for the Qing court, and commissioned many sculptures and ritual items for ceremonies. The embossed silver inset panels on a ritual conch in Rehol, Chenge (see Chen Qingying, Buddhist Art from Rehol, 1999, no. 65, p. 153) are very closely related in the treatment of the animal figures and auspicious symbols. Also compare with a silver and gilt copper mandala of Vasudhara in the Art Institute of Chicago, (see Pal, Tibet: Tradition and Change, Albuquerque, 1997, pl. 77, p. 154). Furthermore, the presence of a Chinese style pagoda in a prominent position on the upper band of the neck, and the treatment of the animal forms are closely aligned with Chinese norms. These stylistic element together with the Gelupa style of imagery, make it possible that this vase was commissioned by a patron connected to imperial workshops.Provenance: Spink & Son, Ltd., London, 1998
Private European Collection
Christie’s, New York, March 25, 2004, lot 82Exhibited: London, Spink & Son, Ltd., Body, Speech, and Mind, cat. no. 40, December 1998.
Madrid, Fundación “La Caixa”, Monasterios y lamas del Tibet, cat. no. 34, November 2000-January 2001.Published: Exhibition catalogue, Body, Speech and Mind, London, Spink & Son, Ltd., 1998, p. 76 cat. no. 40.
Ramon Prats, et. al., Monasterios y lamas del Tibet, Madrid, Fundación “La Caixa”, 2000, p. 109, cat. no. 34.
 
Beyond the highlighted collection of furniture and ritual silver objects, there are numerous other rarities to be discovered within this collection. The auction will take place Mar. 13, 2011 at 10 a.m., EST at Bonhams’ New York headquarters.Fine Japanese Works of Art
Following The Sartin Collection of Asian Art auction in the morning is the afternoon sale of Fine Japanese Works of Art. This season’s sale boasts lots that will appeal to a variety of markets and collectors.Jeff Olson, Bonhams Director of Japanese Art, states, “Bonhams Japanese department is pleased to offer a wide variety of objects, paintings and prints in conjunction with the week of Asian art sales held in New York this September. We feel confident that there will something of interest to collectors in all categories of Japanese art.” This auction contains several important armor lots; one in particular being the highly important Haruta-school tosei gusoku armor (est. $60,000-70,000). This high-quality armor, with completely matched elements – even the original green and orange lacing, is historically attributed to Okudaira Nobumasa. Nobumasa is considered a fulcrum in Japanese history because of his role in a key battle that changed the course of Japanese history. Inside the storage box, in which the armor is contained, is an inscription written by San Ko Shoeki, the founder of the Kyushoin temple in Kyoto where the armor is thought to be located. In the closing of his inscription, he states, “When I look at this armor I feel as if Lord Okudaira’s spirit is here with me, and I remember him and feel like he is here before me. This is surely a very important treasure of this temple.”
 
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A highly important Haruta-school tosei gusoku. Late 16th century. Photo: Bonhams
 
The armor of completely matched elements with original green and orange lacing intact and comprising: a thirty-two plate akoda nari kabuto lacquered black and mounted with silvered-copper fukurin and igaki pierced at the base with inoshishime, the top of the bowl adorned with a four-stage chrysanthemum-form tehen kanamono carved with vines, the five-lame Hineno-style shikoro ending in small fukigaeshi, the mabizashi finished with a “rope” edge, a gilt-bronze tsuki to hoshi maedate; the iron reisei men lacquered black and applied with a boar’s bristle mustache and chin tuft, the lips lacquered red and the teeth silvered, fitted with a four-lame yodarekake; the cuirass a ni-mai maru do of iron scales laced in kebiki and fitted with seven sections of four-lame kusazuri, the front of the cuirass applied with a small gilt-copper gumbai and hexagonal medallions containing plum florets, the heraldic crests of the Okudaira clan; tosei sode; oda gote; shino suneate; kawara haidate; one wood storage box; no armor stand. Estimate: US$60,000 – 70,000
奥平信昌 当世具足 16世紀後期Provenance: Okudaira Nobumasa (1555–1615)
Kyushoin Temple, Kyoto, the Okudaira family templePublished: Nakamura Tatsuo, Ken to yoroi to rekishi(Kyoto: Kennin Shoku, 1999)Nakamura Tatsuo, Nakamura Koutoushushikan: Kitaku zoushin zuroku(Kyoto: Kennin Shoku, 1999)Note: This armor is historically attributed to Okudaira Nobumasa. The historical attribution is supported by an inscription (hako gaki) on the inside of the box written by San Ko Shoeki, the founder of the Kyushoin temple in Kyoto where the armor is thought to have been located until modern times. Kyushoin has a long association with the Okudaira clan. The inscription in the box is believed to be authentic as it is written in old Japanese script (kanbun) and uses nuances and phrases relevant to the era in question.The armor is typical of a high-quality armor produced by the Haruta group during the Warring States period (sengoku jidai)in Japan (1467-1610) during the lifespan of Okudaira Nobumasa. The helmet shows alterations on the inside that are typical of alterations done to armors that were made during the second half of the 1500s and updated before the battle of Sekigahara. The fukurin or metal piping on the helmet is plated with silver rather than with gold, which was much more typical. The fabric of the leg protectors is black velvet, which is known to have been imported by Portuguese traders and employed for use in very high-quality armors made by the Haruta group during the late-16th and early-17th centuries. The front of cuirass is decorated with small badges (kanamon), a decorative motif that became popular among Samurai who had served in the Korean campaigns under Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537-1598) in the early 1590s. After the Battle of Sekigahara (21st day of the 9th month of 1600), the custom fell out of fashion and virtually all of these kanamonowere removed. It is rare to find an armor with these articles still intact. In its current state, this armor appears as it did in 1600 when it was last worn into the Battle of Sekigahara (21st day of the 9th month of 1600).Okudaira Nobumasa (born Sadamasa) is considered a fulcrum in Japanese history since his role at a key battle changed the course of Japanese history. His birth name was Sadamasa and he was originally a retainer of the Tokugawa clan but was forced into service with Takeda Shingen (1521–1573). Upon Takeda Shingen’s death, Sadamasa left the service of the Takeda clan and rejoined Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616). His action enraged Shingen’s son, Takeda Katsuyori (1546–1582), who had Okudaira’s wife, children and brother crucified for the action. Then, in 1575, Katsuyori besieged Okudaira at Nagashino Castle, which guarded the gateway to Mikawa, Ieyasu’s hometown. Okudaira, with a force of 500, made a stubborn defense against the Takeda force of 15,000. Fueled by the fire of retribution for the execution of his family, Okudaira was able to hold out long enough for the Oda and Tokugawa forces to rally. Because the siege wore the Takeda forces down and allowed the allies to organize and set up their defenses, the Takeda lost the battle. This was a major turning point which ultimately lead to the end of the Warring States period. Without the efforts and loyalty of Okudaira, the Warring States period may have continued much longer.

For his service at the siege of Nagashino Castle, Okudaira was given permission from Oda Nobunaga (1534–1582) to use the first character of his name “Nobu” and change his name from Sadamasa to Nobumasa. Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded him Nagashino Castle and married his eldest daughter, Kamehime, to him. He was later awarded the territory of Miyasaki, which had an income of 30,000 koku. For his service at the Battle of Sekigahara on the side of the Tokugawa, Okudaira was appointed the first Kyoto Shoshidai or special attaché of the Shogun to the Emperor under the Tokugawa government. Later he was rewarded with the Kano domain in Mino province, which was a 100,000 koku income territory. He died in 1615 at the age of 59.

 
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Inside the box is a separate piece of paper that reads “Written by Master Sanko.” This was likely written by a monk of the temple who was a follower of Sanko Shoeki, the founder of the temple.The inscription on the inside of the box may be translated as follows:Explanation of this armor in the Kyushoin temple (of the Kenninji Temple complex) owned by Okudaira Nobumasa.This armor previously belonged to Lord Okudaira descendant of Taira Nobumasa of Sakushu, and trusted and loyal retainer to the Shogun (Tokugawa Ieyasu). I was his close friend.He played the most important role and rendered distinctive service at Nagashino when he showed great bravery in the face of the enemy and did not retreat even when outnumbered 1000 to 1 and was bestowed rewards for his actions.He was not just a strong warrior but an accomplished intellectual and educated gentlemen who was multi-talented and was accomplished in the ways of poetry, manner, calligraphy, tea ceremony, etc.Not only did he accomplish many great things, but he was proper and respectful and made sacrifices for the good of the country, and was a great man.

When I look at this armor I feel as if Lord Okudaira’s spirit is here with me and I remember him and feel like he is here before me.

This is surely a very important treasure of this temple.

June 14th in the 16th year of the Kanei Era (1637)
23 years after the death of Lord Nobumasa

I (the old) Sanko Shoeki reflect on my memories and write this account.

Signed with kao.

 
Also in the sale is a breadth of work by 20th century Japanese painter, woodblock print maker and world traveler Yoshida Hiroshi. Bonhams is privileged to continue these offerings from the Collection of Yoshida Chizuko, his daughter-in-law, after two successful sales in 2006 and 2008. Highlights from the 67 lots offered during this sale include several non-Japanese subjects done in traditional Japanese woodblock style. During his 1924 tour of North America, he was inspired greatly by several landscapes, including an oil on canvas titled Niagara Falls (1924) (est. $4,000-6,000) ; Lake Louise (1924) (est. $4,000-6,000); Grand Canyon (1924) (est. $8,000-12,000); and Southwest Landscape (1924) (est.$4,000-6,000). Several subjects he revisited a year later, to complete woodblock prints, such as the 1925 woodcut entitled Yosemitto-koku erukyapitan (El Capitan in Yosemite Valley) (est. $8,000-12,000). To name a few of the other series of his work covered in this sale are “Europe,” “Ten Views of Fuji” and “India and Southwest Asia.”
 
Another highlight is a hanging scroll titled “Beauty and Emma-O” by Kawanabe Kyosai, who is known for his lively compositions and virtuoso draftsmanship. As represented in this painting and several of his other works, is the King of Hell ready to hand out punishment to sinners. In this particular work, the King of Hell holds up a mirror where he sees the reflection of a disheveled courtesan waiting for punishment (est. $6,000-8,000).
 
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Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-1889). Beauty and Emma-O. Photo: Bonhams
 
Hanging scroll, ink and colors on silk; a King of Hell holds up a mirror, looking gleefully down at the courtesan and attendant reflected on it; signed Seisei Kyosai ga and sealed Ichiji sen shi. With wood box inscribed Kyosai sensei jigoku dayu no zu and with lot tag 48. 48 1/2 x 19 1/2in (123.2 x 49.5cm). Estimate: US$6,000 – 8,000
 
Provenance: Baron Honda, sold Kanazawa Bijutsu Club, 1936Published: Tokyo Honda Danshaku ke Hayashi ke/Zohin nyusatsu mokuroku (Baron Honda Family and Hayashi Family/catalogue of collection), Showa 11 (1937), Kanazawa Bijutsu Kurabu.Note: Kyosai is known for his lively compositions and virtuoso draftsmanship. His life straddled both the Edo and Meiji periods and was also popular as a caricaturist despite his multiple arrests by the shogunate and the new government. He made several paintings based on similar subject matter – the King of Hell ready to hand out punishments to sinners. The large figure in the background is the King of Hell, symbolized by the character “O” (king) in his crown. The sinner awaiting punishment is shown reflected in his mirror, revealing the wrong-doings that led the deceased to his realm. In this painting expression on the face of the woman is somber, and her hair disheveled, yet she is dressed in beautifully decorated robes. The obi tied in the front indicates she had been a courtesan in her lifetime. Perhaps the apsaraor heavenly deity shown on her obi is a symbol of repentance as she is about to face her fate.The title on the box and the catalogue entry for the Bijutsu Club sale identifies this painting as Jigoku daiyu (Hell Courtesan), a subject for which Kyosai was well known.
 

Major International Loan Exhibition Featuring Greatest Artists in History of Indian Painting Goes on View at Metropolitan Museum

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Payag (Painter), Mir ‘Ali (Calligrapher). Shah Jahan riding a stallion: page from the Kevorkian Album. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1628. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 11 1/8 x 8 3/16 in. (28.2 x 20.8 cm). Page: 15 5/16 x 10 1/8 in. (38.9 x 25.7 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.21b)

Indian paintings have traditionally been classified according to regional styles or dynastic periods, with an emphasis on subject matter and narrative content. Recent scholarship, however, has begun to securely link innovations in style with specific artists and their lineages. Together with a careful study of artist’s inscriptions and scribal colophons, it is now possible to construct a more precise chronology of the development of Indian painting.

Beginning September 28, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present “Wonder of the Age”: Master Painters of India, 1100-1900, a major loan exhibition devoted to the connoisseurship of Indian painting, with some 200 works selected according to identifiable hands and named artists. The exhibition dispels the notion of anonymity in Indian art. The high points of artistic innovation in the history of Indian painting will be demonstrated through works by more than 40 of the greatest Indian painters, some of whom are identified for the first time. Each artist will be represented in the exhibition by five to six seminal works.

The exhibition is made possible by MetLife Foundation. Additional support is provided by Novartis Corporation.

It was organized by the Museum Rietberg Zurich in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Structured chronologically, the exhibition will feature the artistic achievement of individual artists in each period. Highlights include: A Sufi Sage by Farrukh Beg, after a European engraving of the personification of melancholia, Dolor, an extraordinary painting representing the last chapter of the artist’s long career (1615, Museum of Islamic Art, Doha); Peafowl attributed to Mansur, a master of observation of the natural world (ca. 1610, private collection); Jahangir receives Prince Khurram at Ajmer on his return from the Mewar campaign: page from the Windsor Padshahnama by Balchand, a master of composition (ca. 1635, Royal Collection, Royal Library, Windsor); Shiva and Parvati playing chaupad by Pahari, a superb painting with intense saturated color, bold but sparse composition, and stylized landscape, depicting the divine couple relaxing on a tiger skin playing chaupad, a form of chess (1694-95, Metropolitan Museum); and Emperor Muhammad Shah with falcon viewing his garden at sunset from a palanquinattributed to Chitarman II, depicting the emperor enjoying his garden at sunset (ca. 1730, Boston Museum of Fine Arts).

The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue.

Major collections in India, Europe, and the United States have lent works to the exhibition, including: HM The Queen’s Collection Windsor Castle, National Museum of India and the Udaipur City Palace Museum in Rajasthan, the Aga Khan Trust Geneva, the Bodleian Library and the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, and the Museum Rietberg in Zurich.

“Wonder of the Age”: Master Painters of India, 1100 – 1900has been produced under the direction of three eminent scholars—Dr. Eberhard Fischer, former director of the Museum Rietberg; Prof. Milo Beach, former director of the Freer & Sackler Galleries in Washington, D.C.; and Prof. B. N. Goswamy, Professor Emeritus of Art History at the Panjab University, Chandigarh. Dr. Jorrit Britschgi of the Museum Rietberg is the organizing curator in collaboration with John Guy, the Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of the Arts of South and Southeast Asia at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition was on view at the Museum Rietberg Zurich before traveling to New York.

A variety of education programs will accompany the exhibition, including gallery talks, films, and a Sunday at the Metprogram on October 2.

This exhibition in New York is organized by John Guy, Curator in the Department of the Asian Art. The exhibition design is by Daniel Kershaw, Exhibition Design Manager; graphics are by Sue Koch, Graphic Design Manager; and lighting is by Clint Ross Coller and Richard Lichte, Lighting Design Managers, all of the Metropolitan Museum’s Design Department.

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Purkhu (Attributed). Maharaja Sansar Chand of Kangra admiring pictures with his courtiers. Pahari region of Himnachal Pradesh, ca. 1800 – 1815; Opaque watercolor on paper; Painting: 9 1/16 x 7 1/16 in. (23 x 18 cm); Page: 11 7/16 x 8 11/16 in. (29 x 22 cm). Museum Reitberg Zürich, Bequest of Balthasar Reinhart (2005.9)

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Master of the Jainesque Shahnama. Unknown workshop, possibly Malwa Siyavash faces Afrasiyab across the Jihun River: page from a Shahnama manuscript. India, ca. 1425–50. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper; Painting: 7 7/8 x 4 13/16 in. (20 x 12 cm). Page: 12 11/16 x 9 1/4 in. (32 x 23.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Balthasar and Nanni Reinhart (RVI 964, f. 108v.) 

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Basawan, Shravana and Tara (Attributed). Asad ibn Kariba launches a night attack on the camp of Malik Iraj: folio from a Hamzanama series. Delhi-Fatephur Sikri, ca. 1570. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on cotton cloth, mounted on paper, 27 x 21 1/4 in. (68.6 x 54 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Rogers Fund, 1918 (18.44.1)

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Basawan. The Sufi Abu’l Abbas rebukes the vain dervish: page from a Baharistan of Jami manuscript. Mughal court atLahore, dated 1595. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 7 11/16 x 4 15/16 in. (19.5 x 12.6 cm). Page: 11 13/16 x 7 11/16 in. (30 x 19.5 cm). The Bodleian Library, University ofOxford(Ms. Elliot 254, f. 9a)

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Basawan (Attributed). Woman worshipping the sun: page from a Jahangirnama manuscript. Mughal court atLahoreorDelhi, ca. 1590–95. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 9 1/16 x 4 1/2 in. (23 x 11.5 cm). Page: 16 3/4 x 10 1/2 in. (42 x 26.7 cm). Museum of Islamic Art,Doha(Ms. 157)

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‘Abd-al-Samad. Two fighting camels. Mughal court at Fatehpur Sikri orLahore, ca. 1590. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper, 7 3/8 x 8 1/16 in. (18.8 x 20.5 cm). Private Collection

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Manohar (Attributed), Akbar hunting in a qamargha, or the humiliation of Hamid Bhakari: page from an Akbarnama manuscript. Mughal court probably atLahore, dated by association 1597. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 8 7/16 x 5 in. (21.4 x 12.7 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Theodore M. Davis Collection. Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915 (30.95.174.8)

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Manohar or Basawan (Attributed), Mother and child with a white cat: folio from the Jahangir al’ Album. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1598. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 8 9/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21.7 x 13.7 cm). Page: 14 9/16 x 9 5/8 in. (37 x 24.4 cm). The San DiegoMuseumof Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection (1990.293)

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Farrukh Beg, Emperor Babur returning late to camp, drunk after a boating party in celebration of the end of Ramadan (‘id) in 1519: page from a Baburnama manuscript. Mughal court at Lahore, dated 1589. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 9 5/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21 x 13 cm). Page: 16 1/8 x 10 5/8 in. (40.9 x 27 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Purchase – Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program, and Arthur M. Sackler (S1986.231)

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Farrukh Beg, A Sufi sage, after the European personification of melancholia, Dolor. Mughal court atAgra, dated 1615. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 7 5/8 x 5 9/16 in. (19.4 x 14.1 cm). Page: 15 1/16 x 10 1/16 in. (38.2 x 25.6 cm). Museum of Islamic Art,Doha

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Farrukh Beg, Self-portrait of Farrukh Beg: page from a muraqqa of Shah Jahan. Mughal court at Agra, ca. 1615. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 5 13/16 x 2 7/8 in. (14.7 x 7.3 cm). Page: 21 15/16 x 13 11/16 in. (55.7 x 34.8 cm). Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection

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Keshav Das, Akbar with falcon receiving Itimam Khan, while below a poor petitioner (self-portrait of the painter Keshav Das as an old man) is driven away by a royal guard: page from the Jahangir Album. Mughal court atLahore, dated 1589. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 8 1/2 x 5 7/8 in. (26.7 cm x 15 cm). Page: 21 1/8 x 15 1/2 in. (53.7 cm x 39.5 cm). Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz (Ms. 117, fol. 25 a)

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Keshav Das, Saint Jerome. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1580 – 85. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 11/16 x 3 15/16 in. (17 x 10 cm). Page: 12 5/8 x 8 1/16 in. (32.1 x 20.5 cm). Musée des Arts Asiatiques—Guimet, Paris (MA 2476)

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Aqa Riza (Painter), Mir ‘Ali (Calligrapher), Fath Muhammad (Marginalia), A youth fallen from a tree: page from the Kevorkian Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1610. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 8 9/16 x 5 3/8 in. (21.7 x 13.7 cm). Page: 14 9/16 x 9 5/8 in. (37 x 24.4 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.20v)

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Abu’l Hasan, Study of Saint John the Evangelist, adapted from Dürer’s Crucifixion engraving of 1511. Mughal court, probably atAllahabad, dated 1600 – 1601. Brush drawn ink on paper, 3 15/16 x 1 13/16 in. (10 x 4.6 cm). TheAshmoleanMuseum,Oxford. Gift of Gerald Reitlinger, 1978 (EA 1978.2597)

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Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471–1528, Crucifixion, from The Small Engraved Passion. German, dated 1511. Engraving. Page: 4 9/16 x 2 15/16 in. (11.6 x 7.4 cm). The MetropolitanMuseum of Art,New York. Fletcher Fund, 1919 (19.73.13)

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Abu’l Hasan, Celebrations at the accession of Jahangir: page from a Jahangirnama manuscript; St. Petersburg Album. Mughal court atAjmerorAgra, ca. 1615–18. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Image: 14 7/8 x 8 11/16 in. (37.8 x 22 cm). Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Oriental Studies,St. Petersburg(Ms. E-14, fol. 10)

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‘Abid, The death of Khan Jahan Lodi: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atAgra, 1633. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 12 1/2 x 7 7/8 in. (31.8 x 20 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,WindsorCastle(Ms. 1367, fol. 94b)

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Mansur (Attributed), Great hornbill: page from the Kevorkian Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court atAjmer, ca. 1615. Opaque watercolor, gold and ink on paper. Page: 15 5/16 x 10 in. (38.9 x 25.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase,RogersFund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.14v)

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Mansur, Chameleon. Mughal court at LahoreorAllahabad, ca. 1595–1600. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 4 5/16 x 5 3/8 in. (11 x 13.7 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,WindsorCastle(RL 12081)

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Balchand, Jahangir receives Prince Khurram atAjmeron his return from the Mewar campaign: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atLahoreor Daulatabad, ca. 1635. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 11 15/16 x 7 15/16 in. (30.4 x 20.1 cm). Page: 22 15/16 x 14 7/16 in. (58.2 x 36.7 cm). Mounted: 32 x 24 in. (81.3 x 61 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library, Windsor (RCIN 1005025, fol. 43b)

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Balchand, A youth expires when his beloved approaches and speaks to him: incomplete page from a Gulistan of Sa’di manuscript. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1610–15 (additions c. 1640, perhaps by Murad). Opaque watercolor on paper, mounted and lacquered. Painting: 7 3/8 x 5 in. The David Collection, Copenhagen (1/2009)

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Payag, Nasiri Khan directing the siege of the fort of Qandahar, May 1631: page from the Windsor Padshahnama. Mughal court atAgra, ca. 1633. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 12 5/8 x 9 in. (32.1 x 22.9 cm). Page: 22 15/16 x 14 7/16 in. (58.2 x 36.7 cm). The Royal Collection, Royal Library,Windsor Castle (RCIN 1005025)

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Payag (Attributed). Prince Dara Shikoh hunting nilgais. Mughal court, probably at Lahore, ca. 1635. Opaque watercolor on paper. 6 3/16 x 8 11/16 in. (15.8 x 22.1 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Purchase, Washington, D.C. (S1993.42a)

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Payag. Humayan seated in a landscape, admiring a turban ornament: page from the Late Shah Jahan Album. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1650. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 7 3/8 x 4 3/4 in. (18.7 x 12.1 cm).. Page: 17 1/2 x 13 in (44.5 x 33 cm). Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian. Institution, Purchase—Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program, and Dr. Arthur M. Sackler, Washington, D.C. (S86.0400)

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Masters of the Chunar, Ragamala (Shaykh Husayn, Shaykh Ali, Shaykh Hatim), Malkausik Raga: page from the Chunar Ragamala. Chunar, Uttar Pradesh, dated 1591. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. 10 3/8 x 6 5/16 in. (26.3 x 16 cm). Private Collection, New York

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Nasiruddin, Varati Ragini: folio from the Chawand Ragamala series. Chawand, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1605. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Page: 8 1/16 x 7 1/2 in. (20.5 x 19 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Martin and Sylvia Escher (RVI 1786)

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Hada Master (Attributed), Rao Jagat Singh of Kota at ease in a garden. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1660. Opaque watercolor on paper. Image: 10 5/8 x 6 15/16 in. (27 x 17.7 cm). Private Collection

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Early Master at the Court of Mandi (Attributed). The gopis pleading with Krishna to return their clothes: folio from a Bhagavata Purana series. Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1635–50. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 11 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (29.8 x 19.7 cm). Page: 13 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. (34.9 x 23.5 cm). The Kronos Collections

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Ruknuddin, Vishnu with Lakshmi enthroned, on a roof terrace. Bikaner, Rajasthan, dated 1678. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 7 5/8 x 10 3/16 in. (19.3 x 25.8 cm). Page: 10 7/16 x 12 5/16 in. (26.5 x 32.8 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Bequest of Lucy Randolph (RVI 1854)

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Kripal of Nurpur (Attributed), Devi parades in triumph. Nurpur, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1660–70. Opaque watercolor, gold and beetle-wing cases on paper, 7 5/16 x 10 11/16 in. (18.5 x 27.2 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, permanent loan, Collection of Barbara and Eberhard Fischer, on loan to the Museum Rietberg Zürich 

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Devidasa of Nurpur, Shiva and Parvati playing chaupar: folio from a Rasamanjari series. Basohli, Jammu, dated 1694–95. Opaque watercolor, ink, silver, and gold on paper. Painting: 6 1/2 x 10 7/8 in. (16.5 x 27.6 cm). Page: 8 x 12 1/4 in. (20.3 x 31.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Dr. J. C. Burnett, 1957 (57.185.2)

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Devidasa of Nurpur, Shiva and Parvati as Ardhanishvara: folio from the Rasamanjari II series. Nurpur/Basohli, Himachal Pradesh/Jammu, dated 1694–95. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 6 3/4 x 11 3/16 in. (17.1 x 28.4 cm). The San Diego Museum of Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection (1990.1043).

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Bahu Masters. King Dasaratha and his retinue proceed to Rama’s wedding: folio from the Shangri II Ramayana series. Bahu, Jammu, ca. 1690–1710. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 7 3/4 x 11 5/8 in. (19.7 x 29.5 cm). Page: 8 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (22.2 x 31.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, The Dillon Fund, Evelyn Kranes Kossak, and Anonymous Gifts, 1994. (1994.310)

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 Bahu Masters. Vasishtha visits Rama: folio from the Shangri I Ramayana series. Bahu, Jammu, 1680–90. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Page: 8 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (21.6 x 31.8 cm). Private Collection

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 Bahu Masters. Raga Madhava: folio from a Ragamala series. Bahu, Jammu, ca. 1720. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Painting: 6 5/16 x 5 29/32 in. (16 x 15 cm). Page: 7 29/32 x 7 5/16 in. (20 x 18.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Collection of Alice Boner (RVI 1226)

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 Master at the Court of Mankot. Celebrations of Krishna’s birth: page from a Bhagavata Purana series.  Mankot, Jammu, ca. 1700–25. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Image: 9 x 6 in. (22.9 x 15.2 cm). Page: 11 3/4 x 8 3/8 in. (29.8 x 22.2 cm). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Edward L. Whittemore Fund (1988.70)

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 Stipple Master (Attributed), Maharana Amar Singh II riding a Jodhpur horse. Udaipur, Rajasthan, ca. 1700–1710. paque watercolor and ink on paper. ainting: 13 3/16 x 10 3/4 in. (33.5 x 27.3 cm). Page: 14 11/16 x 12 1/8 in. (37.3 x 30.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky Fund, 2002 (2002.177) 

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Kota Master A (Attributed), Ram Singh I of Kota hunting rhinoceros. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1700. Opaque watercolor on paper. Page: 12 5/8 x 18 3/4 in. (32.1 x 47.6 cm). Private Collection 

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 Kota Master A (Attributed), Ram Singh I of Kota hunting at Makundgarh. Kota, Rajasthan, ca. 1690. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. Page: 13 5/32 x 10 19/32 in. (33.5 x 26.8 cm). Private Collection 

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 Kota Master C (Attributed), Emperor Farrukhsiyar being paraded in a palanquin. Kota, Rajastha,. ca. 1713. Opaque watercolor on paper. Page: 14 3/16 x 9 3/16 in. (36 x 23.3 cm). Gursharan S. and Elvira Sidhu 

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 Chitarman II (Attributed), Emperor Muhammad Shah with falcon viewing his garden at sunset from a palanquin. Mughal court at Delhi, ca. 1730. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 15 1/16 x 16 3/4 in. (38.3 x 42.5 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Arthur Mason Knapp Fund (26.283) 

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 Mir Kalan Khan (Attributed), Baz Bahadur and Rupmati hawking. Mughal, Delhi, ca. 1735. Opaque watercolor on paper, 8 3/16 x 10 1/2 in. (20.8 x 26.6 cm). Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection 

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 Manaku, South wind cools in the Himalayas: folio from a Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, dated 1730. Opaque watercolor on paper, 8 3/8 x 12 1/16 in. (21.2 x 30.7 cm). National Museum, New Delhi (51.207/9) 

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First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, South wind cools in the Himalayas: folio from the second Guler Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1730. paque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 1/8 x 10 in. (15.6 x 25.4 cm). Page: 6 1/8 x 10 13/16 in. (17.8 x 27.4 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection (A 6) 

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 Manaku, Krishna playing blindman’s bluff. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1750–1755. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper9 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. (24.5 x 17.2 cm). The Kronos Collections 

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Nainsukh (Attributed), Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota worships Krishna and Radha. Jasrota, Himachal Pradesh ca. 1745 – 1750. Opaque watercolor, ink, silver and gold on paper, 7 3/4 x 6 1/8 in. (19.7 x 15.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1994 (1994.377) 

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 Nainsukh (Attributed), Raja Balwant Singh of Jasrota viewing a painting presented by the artist Nainsukh. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1745 – 1750. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, 8 1/4 x 11 13/16 in. (21 x 30 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Balthasar and Nanni Reinhart (RVI 1551) 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, Krishna and Radha enjoy a winter’s evening on the roof terrace, in the month of Margashirsha (November-December): folio from a Baramasa series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh ca. 1780. Opaque watercolor, gold and silver-colored paint on paper, 11 1/16 x 8 1/8 in. (28.1 x 20.6 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art, Alvin O. Bellak Collection, 2004 (2004-149-76) 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh, The Village beauty: folio from the Guler Bihari Satsai series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1785. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper, 7 1/2 x 5 1/8 in. (19 x 13 cm). The Kronos Collections 

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 First generation after Manaku and Nainsukh. Krishna with Radha in a forest glade: folio from the second Guler Gita Govinda series. Guler, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1775. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 6 9/16 x 10 1/16 in. (16.6 x 25.6 cm). Page: 6 7/8 x 10 13/16 in. (17.5 x 27.5 cm). Collection of Barbara and Eberhard Fischer, on permanent loan to the Museum Rietberg Zürich (REF 35)

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 Purkhu (Attributed). Krishna flirting with the gopis, to Radha’s sorrow: folio from a Gita Govinda series. Kangra, Himachal Pradesh, ca. 1760. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. Painting: 9 7/16 x 12 5/8 in. (24 x 32 cm). Page: 11 x 14 5/16 in. (28 x 36.3 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Bequest of Lucy Rudolph (RVI 1852)

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 Bagta (Attributed). Kunvar Anop Singh hawking. Devgarh, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1777. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 14 3/16 x 10 7/16 in. (36 x 26.5 cm). Page: 16 1/8 x 11 5/8 in. (41 x 29.5 cm). Museum Rietberg Zürich, Gift of Carlo Fleischmann Foundation (RVI 2198)

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 Bagta. Rawat Gokul Das II at Singh Sagar Lake Palace, Devgarh, shooting fowl. Devgarh, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1806. Opaque watercolor with gold and silver on paper, 21 5/8 x 31 1/2 in. (55 x 80 cm). The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, lent by Howard Hodgkin (LI.118.80)

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 Chokha (Attributed), Escapade at night: a nobleman climbs a rope to visit his lover. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1800–1810. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 11 1/2 x 14 7/8 in. (29.2 x 37.8 cm). Page: 12 1/4 x 16 1/8 in. (31 x 40.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2006. (2006.451)

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 Master of the Company School. Four tribesmen. Delhi region, Haryana, ca. 1815–1816. Opaque watercolor on paper. Painting: 9 3/16 x 14 3/4 in. (23.3 x 37.4 cm). Page: 12 3/8 x 17 1/16 in. (31.4 x 43.4 cm). The David Collection, Copenhagen, (60/2007)

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 Tara. Maharana Sarup Singh and his courtiers on elephants celebrating the festival of Holi. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1850. Opaque watercolor on paper, 35 13/16 x 50 in. (91 x 127 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2010.T.0011)

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 Tara. Maharana Sarup Singh inspects a prize stallion. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1845–1846. Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper. Painting: 16 3/4 x 22 3/4 in. (42.5 x 57.8 cm). Page: 19 x 24 7/8 in. (48.3 x 63.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky Fund, 2001 (2001.344)

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Tara. Portrait of Sarup Singh with attendants, after William Carpenter. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, 1851. Opaque watercolor on paper, 13 15/16 x 19 7/8 in. (35.5 x 50.5 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2010.T.0014)

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Shivalal, Maharana Fateh Singh’s hunting party crossing a river in a flood. Udaipur, Mewar, Rajasthan, dated 1893. Opaque watercolor on paper, 32 1/2 x 62 1/4 in. (82.5 x 158 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur, Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation (2010.T.0006)

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Photographer unknown, overpainted by Shivalal. Portrait of Jaswant Singh II of Jodhpur (1873–1896). Jodhpur, Rajasthan, ca. 1875. Albumen print, hand colored, 10 1/4 x 8 15/16 in. (26 x 22.7 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2008.06.0356

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The Painter [Chitaro] Tara. Photograph, 3 5/16 x 2 1/16 in. (8.4 x 5.3 cm). Pictorial Archives of the Maharanas of Mewar, The City Palace Museum, Udaipur

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Photographer unknown, Portrait of Mohanlal with his camera. Udaipure, Mewar, Rajasthan, ca. 1875. Albumen print, 3 7/8 x 2 5/16 in. (9.8 x 5.8 cm). The City Palace Museum, Udaipur (2008.01.0104

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One response to “The Vintage Asia Artwork Collections Part Two

  1. I have two Mogol miniatuur paintings on cotton or silk for sale on http://www.marktplaats.nl . You can find them using the seachword Mogol. If possible please let me know more about them. They were both in Pakistan in the 1980ties. I would appreciated your comments. Thans in advance
    Annalynn / Bart
    Medemblik / the Netherlands

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