The Chinese Qing Imperial silk Robe Embroidery Collections exhibition

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

The Chinese Imperial Silk Robe Embroidery Exhibitions

Veste kimono en velours frappé bleu nuit. Indochine 1900

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Veste kimono en velours frappé bleu nuit. Chine, 1900.

de motifs de fleurs, galons et doublure satin bleu, les boutons en pierre dure rose.

Textiles chinois

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Chine – robe en soie et tissu brodé,  fin du XIXème siècle. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor polychrome or de dragons, pics, emblèmes bouddhiques et ruyi se détachant sur fond corail.. Estimation : 3000/5000€

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Chine du Sud – 4 panneaux en soie et tissu brodé, circa 1900 (détail). Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de personnages, oiseaux et végétaux – fond rouge, ivoire ou jaune – Estimation : 1300/1500€

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Chine – 4 éléments de robes en soie et tissu brodé. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de volatiles, phénix et tigres – Dynastie Qing (petits accidents) – Estimation : 500/600€

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Chine – 4 éléments de robes en soie et tissu brodé. Dynastie Qing. Photo AZUR ENCHERES CANNES

décor de volatiles, phénix et tigres – (petits accidents). Estimation : 500/600€

Chinese Rank Badges, Buzi @ Christie’s NY

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 A Rare Pair Of Brocade Gold-Ground Civil Official’s Rank Badges of a Peacock, Buzi. Late 17th-Early 18th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank and finely woven with a peacock (kongque) with spread wings and tail facing the sun and surrounded by ruyi-shaped clouds as it stands on one leg on a pierced rock emerging from a band of rolling waves tossed with ‘precious objects’, all in shades of blue, coral red, and turquoise reserved on a gold ground, all within a double blue line border; 10 7/8 in. x 12 in. (27.6 x 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame (2). Estimate $30,000 – $40,000

Provenance: Myrna Myers, Paris.

Notes: Rank badges of this type woven in brocade with a gold ground appear to be quite rare. A stylistically similar badge made for a military official of the fourth rank, woven in brocade with a lion on a gold ground, and dated to the Yongzheng period, is illustrated in the exhibition catalogue, Power Dressing: Textiles for Rulers and Priests from the Chris Hall Collection, Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore, 2006, no. 67. The rendering of the waves, rocks and clouds is quite similar on the two, as is the woven gold ground.

The use of badges applied to the front and back of court robes to indicate rank was instituted during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and continued through the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). While Ming dynasty badges were displayed on the court robe, Qing dynasty badges were moved to an outer garment, or surcoat.

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 A Very Rare Pair Of Embroidered Gauze Military Official’s Rank Badges of Panthers, Buzi. Early 18th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a sixth rank military official, finely embroidered in counted stitch on a dark blue gauze ground with a panther (biao) standing between two upright rock formations surrounded by clouds, above a lishui stripe, and all within a cloud border, in muted shades of ivory, beige, blue, pale green, pale gold and pale russet, within an outer border of couched gold key fret; 9¾ in. x 10 in. (24.8 x 25.4 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $25,000 – $35,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Seed Pearl-Embroidered Dark Blue Silk Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Peacock, Buzi. Late 18th-19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank, unusually embroidered with seed pearls on the body and spread wings of the peacock (kongque) shown facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from froth-capped waves tossed with ‘precious objects,’ flanked by a fruiting peach and narcissus to one side and peony and lingzhi to the other, and surrounded by the wufu and lingzhi-shaped clouds, all satin-stitched in muted shades of blue, coral, yellow and white, within a key-fret border of couched gold thread; 12 x 12½ in. (30.5 x 31.8 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $12,000 – $18,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Literature: L. Wrigglesworth, The Badge of Rank, London, 1990, p. 39.

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A Rare Seed Pearl-Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Crane, Buzi. Mid-19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the first rank and finely worked in satin stitch and seed stitch, the seed pearl-embroidered crane (xianhe), shown facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from breaking waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ and bordered below by lingzhi-shaped clouds, flanked by peaches to one side and roses and lingzhi to the other, and surrounded by the wufu in flight amidst further clouds, all picked out in muted shades of blue, coral, grey, white and black, and couched gold thread, within an outer border of couched gold thread key fret; 12 in. (30.5 cm.) square, mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $10,000 – $15,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Notes: A crane rank badge with similar embroidery, color scheme and design, as well as the use of seed-pearls to highlight the body, dated to the Daoguang period, is illustrated by L. Wrigglesworth, The Badge of Rank III, London, 1996, p. 23.

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 A Pair Of Embroidered Dark Blue Silk Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Peacocks, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Each made for a civil official of the third rank and elaborately worked in Peking knot, the bird (kongque) shown looking at the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with Buddhist emblems and surrounded by leafy branches of peaches and roses as well as the wufu in flight amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, green, coral, yellow and white, and outlined in couched gold thread, all within a lotus spray and angular scroll border; 11¾ x 12½ in. (29.8 x 31.7 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $10,000 – $15,000 

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A Rare Pair Of Kesi Military Official’s Rank Badges of a Lion, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a military official of the second rank, finely woven with a blue lion (shizi) looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ above a band of ruyi-shaped clouds and a lishui stripe, and surrounded by the wufu and Buddhist and Daoist emblems amidst further lingzhi-shaped clouds reserved against a diaper ground, with some details in Peking knot, all in shades of blue, green, purple, red, pink, white and pale coral, and couched gold thread, within an outer border of shou characters and bats in three tones of gold; 11 7/8 x 12 3/8 in. (30.2 x 31.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $8,000 – $12,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Pair of Embroidered Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Paradise Flycatchers, Buzi. 19th Century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the ninth rank and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the white, long-tailed bird (lanque) shown facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from waves above a broad gold stripe, and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) and the wufu amidst lingzhi-shaped clouds, within a border of flower scroll, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, white, green and yellow, and outlined in couched gold thread; 11 3/8 x 11 5/8 in. (29 x 29.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $8,000 – $12,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.an_embroidered_civil_officials_rank_badge_of_a_golden_pheasant_buzi_19_d5477062h

An Embroidered Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Golden Pheasant, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the second rank, worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the long-tailed, multi-colored bird (jinji) shown facing the sun while standing on a rock emerging from rolling waves above a two-color gold lishui stripe and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) and the wufu amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, green, pale coral, yellow, white, black and magenta, within a flower scroll border; 11 5/8 in. x 12 cm. (29.5 and 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $6,000 – $10,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 An Embroidered Satin Xiezhi Rank Badge, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a censor, and finely worked in satin stitch and Peking knot with a mythical beast (xiezhi) with white body and greenish mane shown looking up at the sun while standing atop wind-tossed rolling waves interspersed with ‘precious objects,’ with rocks at either side and surrounded by lotus scroll and lingzhi-shaped clouds repeated below the waves, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, yellow and white, and couched gold thread within a border of bats and shou characters; 11 x 11¾ in. (28 x 29.8 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $6,000 – $10,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 A Pair of Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badges of Quail, Buzi. 19th Century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the eighth rank and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread, the bird (anchun) with mustard-yellow body shown facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from a band of rolling waves, clouds and a multicolored lishui stripe, flanked by peaches to one side and peony to the other and surrounded by Buddhist emblems and the wufu amidst ruyi-shaped clouds reserved on a ground of dense gold scrollwork, all picked out in shades of blue, mustard yellow, green, white, purple and pale peach, within an outer border of flower scroll alternating with Daoist emblems, ‘precious objects’ and bats at the corners; 11 7/8 x 11¾ in. (30.2 x 29.9 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $6,000 – $8,000

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 A Pair Of Kesi Civil Official’s Rank Badges of a Goose, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the fourth rank, the bird (yunyan) facing the sun as it stands on one leg atop a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with the bajixiang above a lishui stripe, flanked by flowers issuing from rocks and surrounded by four Daoist emblems and three of the wufu while the other two are in the upper border of ruyi-shaped clouds, all reserved on a ground of gold wan diaper and picked out in subtle shades of blue, white, yellow, and coral, with painted black details, within a border of conjoined wan characters; 11½ x 12¼ in. (29.2 x 31 cm.), mounted, lucite frames (2). Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Jacqueline Simcox, London.

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An Embroidered Satin Xiezhi Rank Badge, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a censor and worked in satin stitch and couched gold thread with a mythical beast (xiezhi) with white body, single horn, and green mane and bushy tail, looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves above a lishui stripe, surrounded by the wufu and Buddhist emblems amidst clouds, all picked out in shades of blue, white, coral and purple, within a border of lotus scroll; 12¼ x 12 in. (31 x 30.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Notes: Worn as the rank insignia of government censors, whose duties required them to root out corruption, the xiezhi served as a symbol of imperial justice.

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 An Embroidered Satin Circular Woman’s Rank Badge of a Crane. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for the wife of a civil official of the first rank, finely worked in fine couched gold and silver thread and satin stitch with the crane (xianhe) facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves tossed with ‘precious objects’ above a gold and silver lishui stripe, flanked by flowers and lingzhi growing from rocks and surrounded by Daoist emblems and the wufu suspending ribbon-tied wan emblems amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, the crane’s poll and the sun stitched with coral-colored beads and the beak and legs in pale blue-green thread, with further details in white and magenta, all within a border of bats alternating with shou characters; 12 in. (30.5 cm.) diam., mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $5,000 – $7,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 An Embroidered Military Official’s Rank Badge of a Lion, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a second rank military official, the gold-couched lion (shizi) shown looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from rolling waves interspersed with ‘precious objects’, flanked by flowers and lingzhi growing from further rocks and surrounded by Buddhist and Daoist emblems floating amidst lingzhi-shaped clouds, all in counted stitch in shades of blue, green, coral, green, yellow, purple and white, and three colors of couched gold thread, within a border of shou characters and bats; 13¼ x 13 5/8 in. (33.6 x 34.6 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $4,000 – $6,000

Provenance: Judith Rutherford.

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 An Embroidered Satin Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a Peacock, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the third rank and worked in satin stitch, the peacock (kongque) shown looking at the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from breaking waves tossed with ‘precious objects,’ flanked by flowers and lingzhi sprouting from rocks and surrounded by ruyi-shaped clouds and two bats, all picked out in shades of blue, coral, yellow, white and grey, within a border of couched gold thread key fret; 11½ x 11 5/8 in. (29.2 x 29.5 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $4,000 – $6,000

Provenance: Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

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 An Embroidered Gauze Civil Official’s Rank Badge of a goose, Buzi. 19th century. Photo: Christie’s Images Ltd., 2010

Made for a civil official of the fourth rank and embroidered in brick stitch with the white bird (yunyan) facing the sun as it stands on a rock emerging from waves above a two-color gold lishui stripe, flanked by flowers and surrounded by the bajixiang (Eight Buddhist Emblems) arranged amidst ruyi-shaped clouds, all in shades of blue, white and black, and outlined in couched gold thread, within a lotus scroll border; 11 5/8 x 12¼ in. (29.5 x 31 cm.), mounted, lucite frame. Estimate $2,000 – $3,000

Provenance: Valery M. Garrett Collection.
Linda Wrigglesworth, London.

Literature: V. Garrett, Chinese Dress from the Qing Dynasty to the Present, Tokyo/Vermont/Singapore, 2007, fig. 134, p. 76.

A rare imperial blue-ground kesi surcoat (jiagua); Qing dynasty, 18th-19th century

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A rare imperial blue-ground kesi surcoat (jiagua). Qing dynasty, 18th-19th century. Photo Sotheby’s

 the front-opening surcoat woven on the front and back with eight symmetrically placed dragon medallions, four forefacing and four in profile, each worked in gold-wrapped threads resplendent above cresting waves, encircled by the bajixiang, vaporous clouds and bats, the dragons in profile clutching a flaming pearl, all reserved on a midnight-blue ground above roiling waves with foaming crests interspersed with the bajixiang, centered by the terrestrial diagram, above ruyi-form froth and a narrow lishui band, the short sleeves with striding dragons and a conforming wave hem. Width over sleeves 58 3/4 in., 149.5 cm. Estimate 50,000-70,000 USD

PROVENANCE: Collection of Dr. Harvey J. Howard (1880-1956).

NOTE: Dr. Howard was born in Churchville, New York and did his first rotation in China from 1910-1915 as head of the Opthalmology department at the University Medical School, Canton Christian College. After research at Harvard on a Rockefeller Foundation Scholarship as well as a commission as captain in the US army during WWI, he returned to China for an appointment as Head of Opthalmology at Union Medical College in Peking from 1917-1927 and it was within this period, from 1921-25, that he was the ophthalmologist to the young emperor Pu Yi who honored him with the gift of the robe.

This type of surcoat was most likely worn by an empress or dowager empress over a semi-formal robe. A similar robe with the requisite four full facing and four profile dragons is illustrated by Robert D. Jacobsen, Imperial Silks: Ch’ing Dynasty Textiles in The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, vol. 1, Minneapolis, 2000, pl. 109. See a robe sold at Christie’s, New York, 23rd March 1995, lot 275 and another, although on a black ground, sold 2nd June 1994, lot 187.

A fine Imperial yellow-ground silk Throne Cushion Cover. Qing dynasty, 18th century

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A fine Imperial yellow-ground silk Throne Cushion Cover. Qing dynasty, 18th century. Photo Sotheby’s

finely embroidered in polychrome silks with a central medallion of nine peaches surrounded by cranes in flight amidst wispy two-tone blue clouds, each grasping a bamboo stalk in its beak, the border with rolling and cresting waves centered on pierced rocks and celestial peaks, all on a muted gold ground. Height 50 in., 127 cm; Width 51 in., 129.5 cm. Estimate 70,000-90,000 USD

PROVENANCE: Spink & Son Ltd., London, 1989.

EXHIBITED: Spink & Son Ltd., The Minor Arts of China IV, London, 1989, p. 111, cat. no. 148.

Robe dragon en soie bleu. Chine, fin XIXe siècle.

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Robe dragon en soie bleu. Chine, fin XIXe siècle. photo Joigny Enchères

à décor brodé polychrome et aux fils d’or de dragons pourchassant la perle sacrée parmi les nuages et pivoines, chauves-souris et emblèmes bouddhiques, au-dessus des flots.  (Accidents aux manches). Estimation : 2000/3000€

Chinese Blue Silk Robe, 19th Century

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Chinese Blue Silk Robe, 19th Century. Photo Doyle New York

Embroidered with silver dragons above a lishui stripe amid colored clouds and auspicious symbols, all on a bright blue ground. Height 53 inches. Estimate $1,500-2,000

Robe, Chine, XIXe siècle

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Robe, Chine, XIXe siècle. photo Marc-Arthur Kohn

Broderie de soie et d’or Ko’sseu 134 x 200 cm – Estimation : 20 000 – 25 000 €

Cette robe chinoise est réalisée dans un brocart de soie aux motifs très rares. En effet, chaque motif a un symbolisme particulier: On note tout d’abord la présence du motif « shou », de forme circulaire, qui symbolise la longévité. Le motif « wan » est aussi représenté; il est plus connu sous le nom de « svastika » et signifie la joie, le coeur de Bouddha et le chiffre 10000. Ces deux motifs, disposés sur le dessin général, sont encerclés par cinq chauves-souris qui représentent: -une vie longue -la paix et la santé -la richesse -l’amour de la vertu -une mort naturelle. Cet assemblage de motifs est très rare et, en terme chinois, est appelé: « Wufu peng shou ».

Three Chinese robes, 19th & 20th century

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A Chinese late 19th century embroidered gauze dragon robe. photo Bonhams

Of blue gauze, embroidered in silk with eight dragons amongst clouds and symbols of the Eight Immortals above crashing waves, centre front opening, with a loose belt and a fragment of fabric. (3). Sold for £480

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A Chinese 20th century fur-lined embroidered robe. photo Bonhams
 
Of cream silk satin, embroidered with roundels depicting figures and interspersed with flowers, edged with blue embroidered black silk bands, the sleeves decorated with bands featuring peking knots, lined with white rabbit fur. Sold for £228
 
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A Chinese late 19th century embroidered robe. photo Bonhams
 
Of blue silk damask, embroidered with dragons and cherry blossom, edged with embroidered black bands (damaged). Estimate: £80 – 120Unsold
 
 

Robe en soie tissée (kesi) polychrome. Chine, dynastie Qing, XIXe siècle.

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Robe en soie tissée (kesi) polychrome. Chine, dynastie Qing, XIXe siècle. Photo Tajan

à décor de papillons et fleurs de lotus sur fond jaune d’or. Les manches à décor de papillons et orchidées sur fond crème. Le galon à décor de papillons disposés tête-bêche sur fond vert. La bordure ornée d’échassiers, emblèmes bouddhiques et nuées sur fond crème. La doublure vert bouteille. (Accidents et usures). Haut. 130 cm – Estimation : 3 000 / 5 000 €

Robe en soie bleu nuit. Chine, dynastie Qing, fin du XIXe siècle

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Robe en soie bleu nuit. Chine, dynastie Qing, fin du XIXe siècle. Photo Tajan

brodée de fils dorés, à décor de dragons à cinq griffes poursuivant, parmi des motifs auspicieux et au-dessus de flots tourmentés, la perle enflammée parmi les nuées, la doublure en soie bleue. (Légères usures). Haut. 133 cm – Estimation : 1 200 / 1 800 €

An embroidered brown dragon robe, China, 19th ct

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An embroidered brown  dragon robe, China, 19th ct. Photo Nagel Auktionen

Silk floss and threads worked in satin and knot stitches, couched gold threads, unusual motif of the peaches of longevity in a basket shown prominently on the chest area under the dragon facing front – Repairs; L. 138 cm. Estimate 2000 €

Property from a German private collection

Rare robe d’été en gaze de soie damassée crème, changfu. Chine, XVIIIeme-XIXme siècle

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Rare robe d’été en gaze de soie damassée crème, changfu. Chine,  XVIIIeme-XIXme siècle. Photo Artcurial

De couleur jaune pâle ou crème, la gaze de soie très finement damassée d’un motif répété de rondelles à décor de dragon. Hauteur : 129 cm. (50 ¾ in.). Estimation : 600 / 800 €

A RARE DAMASK-WOVEN SILK GAUZE SUMMER INFORMAL ROBE, CHANGFU, 18TH/19TH CENTURY

Comparer avec une robe en satin jaune pâle tissée de médaillons ronds à décor de dragons, datée fin du 18ème, début du 19ème siècle, illustrée par V .Wilson. CHINEse Dress, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1986, p. 39.

Compare with a robe in pale yellow satin woven with dragon roundels, dated late 18th-early 19th century, illustrated by V .Wilson. CHINEse Dress, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1986, p. 39.
A superb embroidered green-ground silk taoist priest’s robe, China, Qing dynasty. Photo Nagel Auktionen

Of rectangular form with wide sleeves, the skirt plied to three folds at each side. Minor tears to the sleeves, minor losses to gold paper, few couched threads loosened. L. 124 cm – Estimate 50 000 €

Cuffs and collar worked with meticulous knot stitch embroidery showing alternating birds and clouds within lobed panels, the hem showing mythical beasts. Flanking the front opening, we see the White Tiger of the West and the Green Dragon of the East, an ancient pair of protective animals. The main motif is to be seen on the back: an elaborate embroidery of a Daoist diagram incorporating the symbols of the sun (cockerel) and the moon (rabbit), the constellation, the symbolic forms of the three mystical Mountains (penglai, fangzhang and yingzhou) and phoenixes to both lower corners of the square diagram. In addition, symbols of longevity like cranes surround the Sacred Mountain scene. The diagram is set against a fine net of couched gold wrapped threads. The complete embroidery is worked with gold and coloured silk threads in knotstitch and couched techniques, the borders show stripes of couched gold leaved paper. Richly decorated vestments like this priest’s robe were used in preeminent daoist ceremonies. The astral symbols on the Daoist robe stand for the relation between priest and cosmos. Heaven is symbolized by the multi-storey pagode in the roundel

Property from an old European private collection 

Cf. a similar type of robe shown in Little/Eichmann “Taoism and the Arts of China”, Chicago 2000, p. 196 as well as blue-ground silk robe “jiangyi” in rectangular form, which shows identical decoration regarding the main motifs as published Christießs, N.Y., 22.3.2007, Lot 457

Robe impériale Long Pao. Chine, XIXème siècle

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Robe impériale Long Pao. Chine, XIXème siècle. Photo Boisgirard Provence-Côte d’Azur

Robe impériale jaune foncé, couleur réservée aux princes, ornée de neuf dragons à cinq griffes (quatre de face et cinq de profil) pourchassant la perle sacrée au milieu des nuages, montagnes stylisées, vagues et li shui, les bandes diagonales à la base de la robe représentant l’eau des profondeurs.
On remarque aux quatre “angles” de la robe les points cardinaux représentés par des rochers en forme de prisme jaillissant des flots, la symbolique prenant forme lorsque la robe est portée, l’homme devant l’axe du monde.
A cela s’ajoutent des chauve-souris tenant divers objets ou symboles auspicieux (sceptre ruy, svastika, pêche de longévité, rouleau de loi, baies, etc.) ainsi que les douze symboles bouddhiques : Le coq à trois pattes au milieu d’un disque solaire, une constellation de trois étoiles, un lièvre au milieu d’un disque lunaire, deux dragons affrontés, la montagne, l’eau, le feu, le grain de millet, le faisan, la hache sacrificielle, les deux coupes sacrificielles et le symbole Fu.
Le col et les poignets sont décorés de dragons pourchassant la perle sacrée au milieu des flots et nuages sur fond bleu nuit.
Les manches snt damassées de dragons.
Dim : Hauteur 136 cm. Largeur 220 cm. Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Chinese silk embroidered wedding hanging, 19th century

10399

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Chinese silk embroidered wedding hanging, 19th century.  Photo Grogan and Company

59 x 86 inches – Estimate $2,500-3,500

Chinese red satin metallic thread embroidered coverlet, late Qing dynasty.

10461

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Chinese red satin metallic thread embroidered coverlet, late Qing dynasty. Photo Grogan and Company

8 feet 2 inches x 6 feet – Estimate $2,000-5,000

Provenance: Mrs. Hong, Xian Xi Province, China;
Reverend James Joyce, by gift, 1945

Notes: The Reverend James Joyce, a Dominican missionary to China, was given this textile by the Hong Family in 1943 to raise money for their church. Rev. James Joyce spent 20 years in China and was held for 5 years as a political prisoner by the Chinese Red Guard in 1955.
The calligraphic inscription along the top border is purported to read: Congratulations, Mrs. Hong on your 60th birthday. You were born into an esteemed family. Everything that passes is successful and peaceful. God has blessed you with all this. You have helped your husband carry out his duties. Everyone commends and praises you. You are gentle, you are nice, you understand everything. Everyone believes you are a great person. May happiness always be with you. You are now old and live in splendor. Yet in your heart you are sincere and pure. In your daily dealings with family and servants you are firm yet fair. You never accept favors or show favoritism. You know the true path to politeness and kindness. A few have written these things in praise of you. You are resolute and confident in your own independence. In the chaos of excitement you know how to mediate. Others believe that you quietly help and support your husband in his esteemed public life. Not only are you all of these things but you are beautiful and serve as an example to all. Your son is following exactly in your footsteps. He is beyond reproach and knows how to treat all people fairly. He is very successful and intelligent. You are a heroine in the inner circles. Your husband is a hero and you are
gentle, kind and honest. May many generations know of your merits. May you be safe and victorious always.
Honorable wife, today you celebrate an important birthday. we come to your court to pay you tribute. You will certainly have good luck following you always. We are embarrassed to present you with such a humble gift as this as a toast to you.

Chinese Imperial black silk and metallic thread embroisered surcoat

10459

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Chinese Imperial black silk and metallic thread embroisered surcoat. Photo Grogan and Company

with five clawed frontal facing dragons;  Estimate $500-1,000

Chinese Nine Dragons silk embroidered robe, 19th century

10450

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Chinese Nine Dragons silk embroidered robe, 19th century. Photo Grogan and Company

length: 58 inches – Estimate $3,000-5,000

The Asia Artwork Collections Exhibition

011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE ASIA ARTWORK COLLECTIONS EXHIBITIONS

93_1

Head of Manasa, the serpent goddess, Eastern India, Gupta period, early 6th century, Terracotta. Height: 30cm. John Eskenazi Ltd.

LONDON.- Since its inception in 1998, Asian Art in London has become one of the world’s most important focal points for international collectors of Asian art, with its series of specialist gallery exhibitions and vents hosted by leading UK dealers and auction houses. In a new move that further enhances its global appeal, Asian Art in London has for the first time invited overseas specialist dealers to join its ranks for the 2011 event, to be held from 3rd to 12th November.International dealers taking part in Asian Art in London for the first time are: Art of the Past from New York; Alexis Renard and Christophe Hioco both from Paris; Carlo Cristi from Italy; Carlos Cruañas from Barcelona. From the Netherlands dealers welcomed are Dries Blitz, Michael Meijering Art Books and Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art. All international dealers will be taking gallery spaces in central London.

Also new to the event this year and adding a further dimension to the ever-expanding group of participants are several London-based dealers. Modern and contemporary Indian art can be found at Grosvenor Gallery, St. James’s; an exciting Chinese performance art piece will be taking place at Hua Gallery’s Battersea riverside location and Mica Gallery in Sloane Square will show modern Pakistani works.

Recently opened Japanese specialist Rutherston Bandini will present, as part of their exhibition, a delightful ivory netsuke of a Kinko on a carp, c.1780 from the Sheila M. Baker collection. Exquisite oriental carpets and textiles can be found at Zadah Gallery, Marylebone. This brings the total number of participants to 51 expanding the event by over 20% on previous years. A full list of all the participants, their exhibitions and specialities can be found below.

Asian Art in London’s sponsors this year are AFEX (Associated Foreign Exchange Brokers) and Apollo Magazine. The Antiques Trade Gazette also continues its invaluable support of the Asian Art in London Art Award for two- and three-dimensional works of art. The award is judged by an international group of experts, including Sir Michael Butler and the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Indian specialist Rosemary Crill, together with Dr Claire Pollard from the Ashmolean Museum and Dr Wang Tao, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Archaeology at SOAS.

The Asian Art in London Gala Party, to be held on the 8th November at the Victoria and Albert Museum, promises to be a spectacular event. The star prize for a lucky guest will be a fantastic free trip to The St. Regis Bangkok hotel sponsored by the St. Regis Group.

Visitors who come to London during the week have the opportunity to view some of the best Asian art in the world, from Imperial porcelain to contemporary, in gallery selling exhibitions and auctions, together with lectures and symposia by London’s major museums.

Asian Art in London, now in its 14th year, has an established reputation as one of the most important Asian art events on the international art calendar.

 
00120m
 
An imperial yellow silk cushion of ruyi-head shape embroidered with lotus and peony blossoms on a trellis and leaf-filled ground, China, Qianlong period (1736-95). Height: 33cm. Jacqueline Simcox Ltd
 
im1_189
 
Bi-Folium from a Shanameh Manuscript, Detail. Mughal, ca. 1590-1600. Opaque watercolor and ink heightened with gold on paper. Dimensions: 11 ¾ x 14 ½ inches (29.8 x 36.8 cm). Art of the Past
 
91_1
 
A Chinese jade carving of a lion dog and cub. Ming Dynasty 17th Century. Length: 5.7cm David Baker Oriental Art
 
im1_2
 
A two-fold paper screen painted in ink and colour on a buff ground with a bijin (beauty) entering a room..Signed: Toyonao hitsu. (Painted by Toyonao). Seal: Toyonao no in. (The seal of Toyonao). Japan 18th century Edo period. Dimensions: H. 65” x W. 71” (164.5cm x 180cm). Gregg Baker Asian Art
 
im1_171
 
Hunting scene (detail). Ink on paper. India, Kotah 19th century. Height: 24 5/8 in (62.5 cm). Width: 35 1/4 in (89.5 cm). Joost van den Bergh Ltd
 
im1_172
 
A pair of Daoguang imperial coral ground bowls 1821-1850. Berwald Oriental Art
 
im1_188
 
Japanese wood portrait sculpture of a Zen monk, 17th century CE. Height: 30 in (76.2 cm). Dries Blitz
 
im1_176
 
A European Private Collection of important jade carvings, including an Imperial pale green jade brushpot, Qianlong mark and period; a rare and large carving of a Buddhist lion, 18th century; and a rare and large carving of a duck and young, 18th century. Estimates ranging from £100,000 – £250,000. Bonhams
 
im2_176
 
A fine single-case lacquer inro. By Shibata Zeshin (1807-1891), Meiji Period.  7.9cm (3 1/8in). Estimate £60,000-80,000. Bonhams
 
Of rectangular form, bearing a dark olive green textured ground, lacquered with ripe chestnuts (kuri) splitting out of their husks, the design continuing on the reverse, where a single chestnut falls beneath a branch of Japanese nutmeg (kaya), in gold, silver and coloured takamakie, the interior of roiro, signed Zeshin; with lacquer hako-netsuke bearing a brown ground and lacquered in gold and shibuichi takamakie with a seated hare among wild flowers, signed Zeshin.
 
im3_176
 
A very fine Imperial white jade ‘Zi Qiang Bu Xi’ seal . Qianlong. Dimensions: 4cm height, 4cm width, 4cm depth. Estimate on Request. Bonhams
 
The square seal surmounted by a superb openwork carving of a five-clawed dragon grasping with his claws onto the seal, his head raised and mouth open revealing the menacing fangs above the flaming pearl of wisdom amidst cloud scrolls, the scales on the writhing body defined by fine incisions, the square seal crisply carved with the characters Zi Qiang Bu Xi (Self-Strengthening Never Ceases), the stone of white tone with minor natural veining.Provenance: a European private collection, purchased by the father of the present owner in the 1960s.

An article by Guo Fuxiang, Researcher, The Palace Museum, Department of Palace History, Beijing, will be featured in the catalogue.

 
im4_176
 
An extremely rare and fine cloisonné enamel model of a traditional go-ban (games board). By Honda Kozaburo of Nagoya, Meiji Period. 23cm x 41cm x 44cm (9in x 16 1/16in x 17 1/8in). It was sold for £216,000 including premium. Bonhams
 
The elegant go floor board is raised on four integral, low bulbous legs and finely worked entirely in silver and gold wire, the four sides alternating between ho-o roundels scattered among kiri-mon interweaved amongst karakusa and confronting butterfly roundels and kiku blossoms among karakusa reserved on a transparent ground flecked with aventurine, the playing surface with the intersecting lined grid finely rendered in gold wire, the underside similarly embellished with stylised foliate motifs on a mustard-yellow ground; the heso signed Dai Nippon Honda sei, with wood storage box.
 
Go (or Wei Qi as it is known in China) is considered by most Oriental game experts to be the world’s greatest strategic skill game, far surpassing Chess in its complexity and scope. Of all the serious board games, go has the fewest rules and yet, the game itself is the most intellectually challenging. The mathematical elegance of the rules is complemented by the great beauty of the board, especially in Japan where it has been elevated to a pinnacle of aesthetic beauty.
 
The exceptionally fine condition and exquisite workmanship of this piece allow us to appreciate the remarkable technique and wide repertoire of the Japanese cloisonné enamel maker’s craft and in particular, the aventurine ground which is specifically referred to by Brinkley in Artistic Japan at Chicago: A Description of Japanese Works of Art Sent to the World’s Fair, Yokohama 1893, as a special characteristic of Honda’s work. The artist’s works are as highly sought after today as they were during his lifetime and extant signed works by Honda, particuarly of this extraordinary quality, are extremely rare.
 
Although go boards of ivory, wood and other materials are in abundant supply, a cloisonné enamel example of this superlative quality, as presented here, is hitherto unrecorded. This would therefore strongly suggest that it was either commissioned directly from the artist by a wealthy industrial family to present as a gift or that it was made for Bankoku Hakurankai (International Exhibition) entry.
 
Compare also with a go-ban which belonged to the Tokugawa Family, lacquered with maki-e patterns of tortoise-shell and aoi-mon crest, illustrated by Colin Mackenzie and Irving Finkel, Asian Games: the Art of Contest, Asia Society 2004, p.208, no.16:7.
 
im1_43
 
A pair of famille verte dishes. 19th or 20th century. Each one of circular form decorated with a pair of Manchu/Chinese ladies beside a child holding a lotus branch. Diameter: 18.50 in (47 cm). Christie’s South Kensington
 
im1_4
 
Marble Fragment. China, Hebei province. 10 x 12 in (25.5 x 30.5 cm). Circa 5th / 6th century with Greek / Roman & central Asian influences. Brandt Asian Art
 
A white carved marble fragment of the lower part of a Buddhist figure. Depicting a pair of legs with bejeweled anklets and flowing overlapping robes, beneath silk tassels. The back, with further naturalistically rendered robes. The details boldly and powerfully designed.
 
im1_30
 
A very rare carved rhinoceros horn ‘hundred boys’ stemcup. 17th century. Height: 3 1/2 in (8.9cm); £300,000-500,000. Important Rhinoceros Horn and Jade Carvings from a Distinguished European Collection Christie’s
 
im1_31
 
A pair of Chinese famille rose tapering vases. China, Yongzheng Period (1723-35). Height: 16.75 (42.55 cm). £15,000-20,000 Christie’s South Kensington
 
im1_184
 
Saraswati. Gilt bronze, Nepal, early 13th century. Height: 17.5cm/7inches. Carlo Cristi
 
im1_191
 
Sakyamuni Buddha. West Tibet/West Nepal. Khasa Malla period. 13th-14th century. Height: 16.5cm. Carlos Cruanas
 
im1_7
 
Huanghuali High Yoke-back Armchair, sichutouguanmaoyi. Late Ming – early Qing period, c. 1600 – 1700. Height: 119.0cm-Depth of seat: 47.5cm- Width of seat: 56.5cm. Eskenazi Ltd
 
im1_169
 
Royal Mandala. Cambodia, Angkor Empire. Angkor Wat, mid 12th century. Bronze. Height 34 cm; diameter 28 cm. John Eskenazi Ltd
 
This bronze mandala presented by John Eskenazi Ltd is an enigmatic work of art.  A group of eight identical figures, seated on a round platform surround a similar, larger individual elevated on a lotus plinth.  Dating from a period of Southeast Asian history when political and religious responsibility were intrinsically joined, the iconography of this mandala cannot be easily ascribed to any known Hindu or Buddhist belief known to have existed within the court of Angkor.  More likely, it represents royal authority, delegated to the principal officers of state, who were bound by oath of loyalty to the service of the king.
 
A mandala is visualised by throwing a rounded pebble into a pool of still water.  The greatest surface effect is witnessed in the centre, with gradually lessening ripples of water emanating outwards.  The visual image of the pebble hitting the water represents a cosmic idea that is deep rooted in South and Southeast Asian sensibility, pervading all aspects of religion and statecraft, as well as architecture, domestic life and every level of human self-awareness.  Be it god, ruler or subject, the individual or landmark at the centre of the mandala is the source of energy whose influence radiates outwards, gradually diminishing in strength, the further it extends.  In a mandala such as this exquisitely carved bronze, the purpose of the surrounding figures is to extend the central source of energy or influence further.  In some mandalas, they face inwards, as if participating in some ritual.  In others, such as this fine and important example, the figures face outwards, poised and ready to disseminate whatever message the central figure wishes to express, beyond the platform on which they sit to the profane or outer realm outside. The central figure holds a lotus in one hand, identifying his spiritual status, which in this instance is that of chakravartin rather than god.  The eight figures around him each hold a lotus between their two hands, which are raised in namaskaramudra (respectful greeting) as they pay their respect to the central figure and convey his goodwill to the outside world. 
 
im1_55
 
An 18th Century lacquer writing box after Ogata Korin, the domed cover worked in gold and coloured taka-maki-e and inlaid in mother-of-pearl and pewter, with stylised hydrangeas and hibiscus, the interior of the cover decorated with plum blossom and rocks, the interior of the base with stylised rippling water, containing the original writing implements of two brushes and a knife. Length 25.5cm., width 23.2cm., height 10.2cm. Malcolm Fairley Ltd
 
im1_132
 
Selection of Scholar’s objects on a scroll form stand.Fleurdelys Antiquités
 
im1_9
 
Four Ladies in a Palace Courtyard. Family of Nainsukh. Guler or Kangra, India, c.1780-1785. 8.35 x 6.3 in (21.2 x 16 cm). Sam Fogg
 
im1_83

Jamini Roy (1887-1972), Three Women. Gouache on paper, 30.3 x 11.81 in (77 x 40 cm). Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd

im1_10

Hunting Party. Amber artist in Mughal style, late 17th century. Francesca Galloway

 im1_163
 
A pair of ‘famille-rose’ ‘soldier’ vases and covers. Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period (1722-35). Height 138cm. Provenance: A Spanish noble family. Gibson Antiques Ltd
 
im1_170
 
Qin Feng, West Wind East Water 078, 2005. Ink, coffee and tea on  silk-and-cotton paper; 51.25 x 37 in (130.2 x 94 cm). Michael Goedhuis
 
im1_190
 
Francis Newton Souza (1924-2002), Temple Dancer. Oil on board, 48 x 24 in (121.9 x 61 cm). Signed and dated top right. Grosvenor Gallery
 
im1_187
 
Shiva Bhiksatana. Steatite. India, Karnataka region. Late 11th century. Height: 82 cm. Provenance: Private collection, Spain. Christophe Hioco
 
im1_185
 
Untitled, 2009, Han Zhongren. Oil on canvas, 110cm x 110cm. Hua Gallery
 
im1_66
 
Chenxiangmu (aloes wood) libation cup. China, Kangxi period, 1662 – 1722. Height: 4 inches, 10.1 cm. Width: 3 3/4 inches, 9.5 cm. Ben Janssens Oriental Art Ltd
 
im1_15
 
An archaic bronze food vessel (yu). Chinese, late Shang-Western Zhou dynasty. Diameter: 10inches, 25.4cm. Roger Keverne Ltd
 
im1_16
 
A yellow jade snuff bottle, 1720 – 1780. Height: 5.5cm. Robert Kleiner & Co. Ltd
 
im1_192
 
Krishna Venugopala. Orissa circa 16th/17th century. Height: 7 3/4in (19.7cm). Jeremy Knowles
 
im1_17
 
Imperial semi egg-shell wine cup, period of Kangxi, with hundred butterfly decoration. Marchant
 
im1_180
 
Allah Teardrop. Swarovski crystal on slate. Dimensions: height 100cm, width 80cm. Mica Gallery Ltd
 
im1_168
 
Qajar tile, Iran 2nd half 19th century. Moulded and painted in cobalt blue, turquoise, manganese and black with a trellis pattern filled with composite flower heads. 31cm wide, 33.5cm high. Amir Mohtashemi Ltd
 
im1_18
 
An ivory netsuke of a recumbent boar by Masanao of Kyoto, its front legs resting on a branch of oak or chestnut leaves.  It boasts an exaggerated snout reminiscent of a baku.  The small lively eyes are of inlaid red buffalo horn. Signed in an oval reserve beneath the right haunch: Masanao. Kyoto, circa 1760. Length: 2 1/4 in (5.7 cm). Sydney L. Moss Ltd
 
im1_177
A pair of ear plugs. Assam, 19th Century. Height: 3.5cm. Susan Ollemans
 
im1_175
 
Fine Japanese silver and multimetal koro (incense burner) in the form of a hawk, mounted on a lacquer stand. Signed Tomonobu, 1898. Kevin Page Oriental Art Ltd
 
im1_119
 
Document Box by Murayama Hisashi. Showa period, 1943. Gold, silver & coloured makie; 38.3 x 17.8 x 10.5 cm. Simon Pilling: East Asian Art & Interiors
 
im1_48
 
A late Ming Fahua porcelain figure of Guanyin seated with two acolytes. Wanli period, late 16th century. Height: 8 in (20 cm). Nicholas Pitcher Oriental Art Ltd
 
im1_89
 
An early Yaozhou pierced cupstand. Northern Song dynasty, 11th century. Diameter: 5 3/4 in (14.5cm).  Priestley & Ferraro
 
im1_24
 
Jade Ram’s Hilt Dagger (Khanjar). India (Mughal), circa 1650. Length of dagger: 32.6 cm. Length of hilt: 11.7 cm. Simon Ray Indian & Islamic Works of Art
 
A magnificent carved jade ram’s head dagger, the tapering watered steel single-edged blade with a gold damascened chape and cusped cartouches issuing down each side of the blade and filled with scrolling vine, the grey jade hilt with slightly flattened spine terminating in a fine and realistically rendered ram’s head with features elegantly carved, the eyes inset with small rubies within gold mounts and the base lightly shaped for the fingers.
 
According to Stuart Cary Welch, a close look at the paintings of the  Padshahnama reveals that the most common form of dagger worn during the reign of Shah Jahan (1627-1658) was the katar (thrust or push-dagger), followed closely by the khanjar.  Of the khanjars depicted in the manuscript however, there are only very few examples with animal-head hilts and these are reserved for princes.
 
Provenance: The Collection of the Late Hon. Mrs Marten, O.B.E., D.L,
Crichel House, Wimborne, Dorset, acquired in the 1950s
 
im1_183
 
Safavid tile. Ceramic decorated in cuerda seca. Iran, XVIIth century; (22 x23 cm). Alexis Renard
 
im1_20
 
Manjushri-Yamantaka. Tibet, c. 1000 AD. Copper alloy with gilding and pigment; 37 cm (14½ in). Rossi & Rossi Ltd
 
im1_33
 
A crimson-pink chrysanthemum dish, Qianlong mark and period, from a private collection of monochrome porcelains. Sotheby’s
 
im1_23
 
‘Life of Buddha’ stone frieze, Pala, 10th century, India – height: 73 cm. A&J Speelman Ltd
 
im1_193
 
4 Chinese Export Silver Mug. S&J Stodel
 
im1_59
 
A box for tea ceremony utensils. Signed Shotei (Moriya Shotei). Circa 1910 ; 15.5 x 18 x 18 cm. Grace Tsumugi Fine Art Ltd
 
A very fine chabako, decorated with a black horse amongst ominaeshi (autumn plant with fine yellow flowers) and susuki (silver grasses) worked in black, red and gold lacquer on a red lacquer ground with dew drops in silver studs. The corners worked in gold lacquer with stylized scrolling motif on a black lacquer ground. Each side of the box with a pierced and shaped window, above a saddle shape black lacquer panel with further autumn grasses and silver studs. The interior of rich gyobu (lacquer with very high content of gold leaf). 
 
im1_26
 
Bronze Kneeling Monk. Burma, Mandalay Period, 19th Century H. 49cms, 19½ins. Jonathan Tucker Antonia Tozer Asian Art
 
im1_186
 
Blue and White Temple Vase . Height: 82 cm. China, Jiajing period (1522-1566). Price on request. Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art
 
The vase is decorated around the neck with Tibetan Sanskrit characters in a calligraphic Chinese style. The central character, placed below three smaller characters, is a mantra -a sound chanted to promote concentration- pronounced as a Buddhist invocation ‘Om’. the most famous mantra in Tibetan Buddhism, Om Mani Padme Hum, invokes the goddes Mahavidya. the shape and decoration on this vase suggest that it was made for ritual use.
 
im1_27
 
A Rare Blue and White Apothecary Jar. Late Ming Dynasty. Chinese porcelain decorated in underglaze cobalt blue. Height: 16cm; Diameter: 9cm. Jorge Welsh Oriental Porcelain and Works of Art
 
im1_179
 
A fine and large pair of Chinese Imperial cloisonné enamel and gilt bronze huluping or gourd-shaped vases. Qing dynasty, each with a six character Qianlong seal mark and of the period 1736-95, 47.2cm. From the collection of HRH Prince Arthur, 1st Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (1850-1942) and his daughter, Lady Patricia Ramsey (1886-1974).  Est: £100,000 – 200,000.  Woolley & Wallis
 
im1_182
 
Ottoman Embroidery, from the Greek mainland, c1700. 210 x 126cm. Zadah
 
im2_182
 
Japanese Kesi Tapestry. 193 x 131cmZadah
 
im3_182
 
Chinese, Ningia rug fragment, 17th Century. Zadah
 
0089
 
ML714
 
The Slaying of the Demon Nisumbha. Pahari, by an artist of the first generation after Nainsukh, 1790-1800; 16.4 x 25.9 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper
 
0088
 
0088
 
Capricorn. Mughal, c.1580–85. Folio  26.8 x 22 cm; painting: 23.5 x 18.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper..
 
0088
 
0088
 
Timur Outside the Fortress of Qarshi. Mughal, 1595–1600. Folio: 28 x 20.3 cm; painting 13.5 x 10.3 cm. Opaque watercolour, ink and gold on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
Krishna is sanctified by vedicrites. Krishna is sanctified by vedicrites. 17.9 x 23.6 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
 0088
 
0089
 
Nawab ‘Alivardi Khan with his nephew Saulat Jang. Murshidabad or Patna, c. 1765. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
0088
 
0089
 
Portrait of a Mughal Princess. Mughal, 1650–75. Opaque watercolour on paper heightened with gold, in a buff album page with regular rows of large gold flowers; a calligraphic specimen is on the reverse.
 
0088
 
0089
 
Hindola Raga. Hyderabad, c. 1760. Folio: 39.2 x 25.1 cm; painting: 24.2 x 15.1 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold and silver on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
Portrait of the Emperor Farrukh Siyyar. Mughal, 1713-1719. Album page:48 x 32.5; painting: 28 x 21 cm; Opaque watercolour, gold and silver on paper, mounted on an early 19th century album page
 
0088
 
0089
 
Baby Krishna upsets the cart .India, by a Bikaner artist, 1690-1700. Painting : 22.7 x 31.2 cm ; Folio: 30.8 x 38.2 cm. Opaque watercolour and gold on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
The Goddess Resplendent. folio: 25.4 x 18.5 cm; painting: 19 x 12.8 cm.. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
Lady holding a wine cup. Mughal, c.1650–60. Folio: 25.5 x 18 cm; painting:13.65 x 8.7 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper heightened with gold, in a buff album page with large gold flowers
 
0088
 
0089
 
The Chinese Hwamei perched on a Bridelia: from the Impey album. Company School, Calcutta, painted by Zain ad-Din for Lady Impey and dated 1780. Painting: 80.5 x 59 cm. Opaque watercolour on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
Mughal Hunting scene: from the Amber Album. By an artist at Amber painting in Mughal style, late 17th century. Folio: 42.4 x 27 cm; miniature: 36 x 24.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
0088
 
0089
 
RADHA AND KRISHNA SHELTER UNDER A PARASOL. Attributed to the Purkhu family workshop, Kangra, c. 1825; 30 x 26.7 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold
 
0088
 
0089
 
Krishna Hunting Black Buck. Bundi, c. 1770-75. Folio: 31.5 x 25 cm; painting: 24 x 19.5 cm. Opaque watercolour heightened with gold on paper
 
0088
 
0089
 
South Indian Tambura. South India, possibly Tanjore, 19th century. Length: 72 cm; width: 26 cm; depth: 18.5 cm. Rosewood, ivory, lac and gilded brass metalwork mounts

Brahma. Grès rose. Inde Poignards rituel «Phurbu», Couperet «kartrika», Trompe d’appel «kang-gling» & Coupe crânienne «Kapala” ,Tibet, XVIIIe & XXe s.,

95

Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet, XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

au manche composé d’une vajra, de trois visages de Mahakala surmonté d’une demi-vajra, la lame sort de la gueule d’un monstre mythique « makara » En fer et bronze doré.L: 27 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

96

Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet,  XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

à l’extrémité du manche figure trois visages de Mahakala, la lame sort de la gueule de « Makara » En fer et bronze doré. . L: 175 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

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Poignard rituel « Phurbu », Tibet, XVIIIe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

au manche composé d’une vajra, de trois visages de Mahakala surmonté d’une tête de cheval, la lame ornée de deux serpents sortant de la gueule d’un oiseau En argent. L: 145 cm – Estimation : 3 600 – 4 000 €

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Couperet « kartrika », Tibet, XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

la lame semi-circulaire en fer, et sommet du manche en forme de demi-vajra H: 15 cm – Estimation : 1 700 – 1 900 €

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Trompe d’appel « kang-gling » . Tibet, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

à décor floral et de deux dragons. En os et cuivre doré, avec incrustation de turquoise et corail. L: 335 cm

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Coupe crânienne « Kapala » avec couvercle sur un support triangulaire. Os et cuivre. Tibet, XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

H: 20 cm L: 17 cm – Estimation : 1 000 – 1 200 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 16 mai à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 6 9, rue Drouot 75009 PARIS. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

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Tiare de lama. Tissu, turquoise et pierres. Ladakh, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

Estimation : 1 300 – 1 500 €

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Chapeau de lama. Tissu, turquoise, corail et ambre. Ladakh, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

Estimation : 1 300 – 1 500 €

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Bracelet se terminant par deux têtes de dragon, aux yeux incrustés de turquoise. XIXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

En métal argentifère.  L: 85 cm – Estimation : 900 – 1 000 € 

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Parure pectorale ornée de cabochons, de perles de corail et de turquoise. Ladakh, début du XXe s  Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

L: 20 cm – Estimation : 250 – 350 €

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Briquet. Tibet, XIXe s.

composé d’un cercle de fer et d’une bourse en cuir enluminé de métaux repoussé serti de turquoise et corail, servant à contenir le silex et l’étoupe.  L: 7 x 125 cm – Estimation : 150 – 180 €

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Bourse en cuir, métal, corail et turquoise. Tibet, XXe s. Photo Néret-Minet & Tessier

L: 8 x 12 cm – Estimation : 120 – 150 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 16 mai à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 6 9, rue Drouot 75009 PARIS. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

Miroir circulaire décor de cercles concentriques. Khmer. Cambodge. 12ème-13ème siècle.

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Miroir circulaire décor de cercles concentriques. Khmer. Cambodge. 12ème-13ème siècle. photo Chevau-Légers Enchères

Bronze argentifère à patine de fouille. Diam 12,5cm – Estimation : 600 / 800 €

Chevau-Légers Enchères – Gilles CHAUSSELAT – 78000 Versailles. Vente aux enchères du Dimanche 17 avril 2011. Hôtel des Chevau-Légers – 3, impasse des Chevau-Légers. Tel: 01 39 50 58 08.

Bejeweled Indian “Pearl Canopy of Baroda” to Be Auctioned at Sotheby’s in New York

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The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24 (detail). Photo: Sotheby’s.

NEW YORK (REUTERS).- A stunning, rarely seen bejeweled, nearly 150-year-old canopy from India is expected to sell for as much as $5 million when it is auctioned next month, according to Sotheby’s.

The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24 as part of a larger auction of Indian and Southeast Asian Works of Art in New York.

It includes over 500,000 pearls, as well as numerous diamonds, sapphires, rubies and emeralds sewn on silk. Floral “Persian-style” vines made with colored beads circle the canopy.

“The Maharaja was a great patron of the arts,” said Mary Jo Otsea, the worldwide director of Sotheby’s carpet department. “This piece is a continuation of the golden age of Indian art from the Mughal period, with Persian influences.”

The canopy dates from around 1865, when it was commissioned by the Maharaja of Baroda, in the present-day Indian state of Gujarat. It is believed that the piece was intended to be donated as a gift to decorate the tomb of the Prophet Mohammed in Medina, in what is now Saudi Arabia.

The man who commissioned the canopy, Maharaja Khande Rao Gaekwar, was known to be particularly fond of jewels. In 1867, he bought the “Star of the South”, one of the largest diamonds in the world.

The canopy is part of a set which included four large rectangular jewel-encrusted carpets, of which only one remains. One of the rectangular carpets was sold at an auction in Doha, Qatar in March 2009 for $5.4 million.

Art historians are still unsure exactly how the carpet and the canopy were arranged together, Otsea said.

“One possibility is this, that four pillars held the canopy over the carpet,” Otsea explained. “Another is that it was somehow placed on a camel. But nobody knows, and the Maharajah died a long time ago.”

The canopy had not been seen for more than 100 years until it was included in an exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London last year.

At the time the canopy was created the nominally sovereign state of Baroda was among the most prosperous in British India, with much of its income coming from cotton, rice and sugar.

Baroda state, which was founded in 1721, existed until it was incorporated into newly independent India in 1947.

“All the states of the time were under the Indian Raj. They were titular heads who led the people, and were free to appoint courts and commission workshops,” Otsea said. “This Maharaja, from what I understand, got on very well with the British.”

Otsea said the canopy is notable, even among the other luxurious works of art commissioned by regional rulers in Baroda and across British India.

“The Maharaja liked jewels, and it was very much a status symbol and showed wealth,” she said. “But this is really something special.”  (Reporting by Bernd Debusmann Jr., editing by Patricia Reaney)

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The Pearl Canopy of Baroda will go under the hammer on March 24. Photo: Sotheby’s.

Bronzes du Bayon, XIIe-XIVe siècle

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Miroir. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

D : 17 cm – Estimation : 720 – 750 €

130

Paire de bracelets. En bronze. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 7 cm D : 7.5 cm – Estimation : 600 – 700 €

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Bracelet en bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s.  Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

L : 15 cm D : 7 cm – Estimation : 600 – 700 €

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Bol à la panse lotiforme. En bronze. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

 (Manques). H : 13 cm D : 13 cm – Estimation : 300 – 350 €

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Miroir. En bronze. Cambodge, Bayon, XIIIe – XIVe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

D : 19 cm – Estimation : 200 – 250 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

L : 5,5 x 4,5 cm

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 10 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 12.5 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

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Pot à bétel. En bronze à patine de fouille. Bayon, XIIe s. Courtesy Néret-Minet & Tessier

H : 14.5 cm – Estimation : 180 – 200 €

Néret-Minet & Tessier. Lundi 14 mars à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu Salle 2. EMail : mail@neret-tessier.com – Tél. : 01 40 13 07 79

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Ambikâ. Inde, Rajasthan, XIIe siècle © BRAFA 2010

Marbre blanc. H 96 cm – Prix sur demande.

Dans l’iconographie hindoue, elle est considérée comme la « Grande déesse », symbolise l’énergie cosmique et combat les forces des ténèbres. Ici elle est représentée debout avec un déhanché ondulant en triple flexion, le tribhanga, qui accentue les formes de la taille et des cuisses.
Elle tient dans son bras gauche un enfant qui s’appuie sur sa hanche ; son autre main, fracturée à ce jour, devait contenir une branche de manguier. Le halo est orné d’un décor floral et sa coiffure très sophistiquée se compose de rangs perlés et de pierres précieuses qui recouvrent sa chevelure. Son visage est caractérisé par une forme ronde, une bouche charnelle, des yeux en amande et une arcade sourcilière bien définie. Richement parée, elle porte de merveilleux éléments de parure. Les canons de beauté indiens associés aux formes pleines et sensuelles sont parfaitement mis en valeur sur cette sculpture. Par son aspect bienveillant la sculpture, cette représentation serait plutôt jaïne qu’hindoue.

Provenance : collection privée, Asie

Ambika. Marble. H 96 cm. India, Rajasthan, 12th century
Ambika, who in Hindu iconography is considered to be the ‘Great Goddess’, symbolizes cosmic energy and fights the forces of darkness. Here she is portrayed in a curving triple-bend stance, the tribhanga, which accentuates the waist and thighs. With her left arm she holds a child on her hip. Her other hand, which is broken off, probably held a mango tree branch. On her halo is a floral design and her highly sophisticated hairdo includes pearls and precious gems. Her face is round, with full lips, almond-shaped eyes and well-defined eyebrows. Her jewelry is rich. All the precepts of Indian beauty are perfectly present in this sculpture. Probably Jain rather than Hindu
Provenance: Asian private collection

0_Après une carrière internationale au sein de la banque JP Morgan, Christophe Hioco s’est consacré, il y a maintenant huit ans, à sa passion de toujours: l’art asiatique. La galerie est spécialisée dans l’art ancien du Vietnam, avec notamment des bronzes de la culture de Dông Son, dans l’art bouddhique d’Asie du sud-est, l’art indien et l’archéologie chinoise. Faisant preuve d’une exigence à la fois artistique, émotionnelle et esthétique dans le choix de ses œuvres, Christophe Hioco accorde la plus grande importance à la provenance et à la qualité des pièces. Christophe Hioco participe à la Brussels Oriental Art Fair depuis 2007 et à la Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair (BRAFA) depuis 2009.

Christophe Hioco @ BRAFA (Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair), Stand N°124. 21-30 january 2011

by appointment. Paris, France. T +33 (0)1 53 30 09 65 – M +32 (0)470 59 48 32 – M +33 (0)6 64 98 65 50 – F +33 (0)1 72 70 33 28 – www.galeriehioco.cominfo@galeriehioco.com

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Petit cabinet indo-portugais. Influence Mughal, XVIe-XVIIe siècle © BRAFA 2010

Teck, ébène, ivoire et montures en cuivre doré. H 15 x L 22 x P 17,2 cm

01L’offre de la galerie AR-PAB est très large allant de l’argenterie, du mobilier, de la sculpture, des objets de curiosité, des ivoires, des bijoux, des instruments scientifiques, à l’art colonial portugais et sud-américain, de la Renaissance au XIXe siècle. Chaque pièce est sélectionnée pour sa rareté, son authenticité et son état de conservation. Tout objet a une histoire, tout objet a une âme et dans chacun d’eux on retrouve un peu de l’histoire des arts decoratifs.

AR-PABBRAFA(Brussels Antiques & Fine Arts Fair), Stand N°:   61

Alvaro Roquette & Pedro Aguiar Branco, Rua D. Pedro V, 69. P-1250-094 Lisbonne, Portugal. T +35 1 21 34 21 682 – M +35 1 96 74 23 311 – M +35 1 93 24 16 590 – F +35 1 22 55 08 154- www.ar-pab.com pab@pab.pt

Courtauld Conservation Experts Undertake New Research of Wall Paintings in Bhutan

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Late 17th-century painting in the Gyalsey zimchung, a private room in Tango monastery © The Courtauld Institute of Art.

LONDON.- The small and stunningly beautiful Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan has for many years intrigued the West, not least on account of its geographic isolation, its hermetic reputation, and its distinct and perfectly preserved culture. The core of Bhutan’s identity is its Tibetan Buddhist heritage which, uniquely in the modern world, remains as rich and vital as it ever has been. In over two thousand thriving temples and monasteries scattered across its rugged terrain, spectacular wall paintings testify to the strength of its cultural and artistic traditions.

Many of these sites are remote and their paintings have never before been recorded. During the last three years, experts from The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, have been given unique access by the Government of Bhutan to undertake scientific research of the kingdom’s wall paintings.

Prior to the 17th century, Bhutan was indivisibly part of the Buddhist kingdom of Tibet. Its emergence as a separate state occurred under the revered leadership of Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyel (1594-1651), himself a religious exile from Tibet. Although Tibetan Buddhism had been well established since the 7th century, the Zhabdrung unified his new country by promoting the Drukpa Kagyu school as the state religion, though other traditions such as the Nyingma also flourished. These traditions are renowned for the meditative practices of their spiritual leaders, whose distinctive lineages are portrayed in Bhutanese wall paintings alongside more traditional Buddhist iconography.

To consolidate both his temporal and religious power, the Zhabdrung also built a series of Tibetan-style fortresses, known as dzongs, at strategic locations across Bhutan. These combined administrative and monastic institutions in a system of regional governance that survives to this day. The dzongs still accommodate communities of hundreds of monks, whose religious life revolves around the many temples (lhakhangs) built within their fortified walls. Usually, each of these temples is adorned with wall painting.

Today, these paintings are vulnerable to a range of threats. The traditional buildings in which they survive are often damaged – and sometimes completely destroyed – by catastrophic fires or floods. In a harsh natural environment, gradual deterioration also takes its toll on the susceptible materials that constitute the paintings. Although continuous religious use has helped to preserve many temples and monasteries, there have been detrimental consequences too: in attempts to renew religious interiors, historic paintings have suffered from modern repainting or have been replaced with paintings on canvas.

The Department of Culture, within the Ministry of Home and Cultural Affairs of Bhutan, is now taking steps to address these problems. Efforts include the current three-year research project with the Courtauld Institute. Following an exploratory visit in 2006 by Professor David Park, Director of the Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department, it was decided that there was an outstanding need to investigate the materials and techniques of Bhutanese wall paintings. An understanding of how the paintings were made leads to an understanding of how they deteriorate and, ultimately, how they can be best preserved. The main purpose of the research is therefore to benefit the Department of Culture in undertaking any conservation of wall paintings in future.

The fieldwork has been carried out by wall painting conservators Lisa Shekede and Stephen Rickerby of the Courtauld Institute, in collaboration with staff from the Department of Culture of Bhutan. The first major phase took place in 2008, and two subsequent phases were completed in 2009 and 2010. Scores of temples and other religious sites were visited throughout the kingdom, to record their paintings and to collect small paint samples for subsequent analysis in London. This is the first time such a wide-ranging scientific study of painting has been undertaken in Bhutan, and findings have proved to be exciting.

Previously scant knowledge of the original materials and techniques of Bhutanese wall painting, and of their historical and stylistic development, has been much enhanced. Although relatively few paintings survive from before the 17th century, the study included unprecedented investigation and analysis of a rare early 16th-century scheme in central Bhutan. Other important paintings examined are those that survive from the period when the Zhabdrung and his successors established their control over the country. Under their patronage, a courtly style of painting emerged, characterized by its remarkable sophistication. In these paintings, expensive pigments, delicate organic colourants and glazes, and skillfully applied discriminating coatings have been found.

This technical complexity has not been previously recognized and it puts many Bhutanese wall paintings at a variety of new risks. The vulnerability of barely visible materials such as deteriorated organic glazes means that they can be all too easily lost in cleaning if their presence is not recognized. The degradation of original materials, such as the discolouration of original varnishes, can also be mistaken as something that should be removed rather than preserved. With ever-growing Western interest in Tibetan Buddhism – and the resources that this attracts – an alarming number of Buddhist wall paintings in India and Tibet have been irreversibly damaged by well-meaning but disastrous cleaning. Bhutan’s isolationist past protected its cultural heritage from such dangers, but the opening up of the country in recent years means that such risks cannot now be ignored.

The Courtauld’s research project is therefore a timely one and its findings have far reaching conservation implications. It is intended that the wealth of technical and other information to have emerged from the study will be used as a foundation for future conservation efforts, based on recognition of the value and vulnerability of the kingdom’s remarkable wall painting heritage.

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Detail of 17th-century painting in the Lama Lhakhang in Trongsa Dzong © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Asian Art Museum Foundation Announces Proposal to Restructure Foundation’s Debt

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Kris hilt depicting a demonic figure, perhaps 1700–1800. Ivory. H: 5¼ in; D: 1¾ in. Asian Art Museum

SAN FRANCISCO, CA.- Mayor Gavin Newsom, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, City Controller Ben Rosenfield, Board of Supervisors President David Chiu and the Asian Art Museum Foundation, the private fundraising arm of the Asian Art Museum, today announced a proposal to restructure the Foundation’s $120 million bond debt. The five-party proposed agreement, coordinated by City Attorney Herrera, City Controller Ben Rosenfield, and City Public Finance Director Nadia Sesay with participation from the Foundation and its creditors, JP Morgan Chase and MBIA, Inc., provides long term stable financing to the Foundation, allowing the organization to continue to raise the funds necessary to support the Museum’s dynamic range of exhibitions and programs. The proposal will now be submitted to the Board of Supervisors, Asian Art Commission and Asian Art Museum Foundation for their consideration.

“Over the years, millions of people have experienced the Asian Art Museum’s famous collection—truly one of the City’s most valuable assets—as well as the rich array of public programs for all ages, including generations of school children,” said Mayor Newsom. “The City’s proposal for strengthening the Foundation’s financial position will make sure these efforts carry on for future generations.”

“This is a smart, carefully crafted agreement that both solves the immediate financial crisis facing the Asian Art Museum and helps guard against similar difficulties in the future,”said City Attorney Herrera. “This problem-solving effort took a great deal of creativity and hard work, and I’m especially grateful to Mayor Newsom, City Controller Rosenfield, and the museum’s management. Work outs are not easy or pleasant. I ’m also appreciative to JPMorgan Chase and MBIA for their cooperative approach here in recognizing the need to make concessions and hammering out an appropriately balanced deal. The Asian Art Museum is a world-class cultural treasure, and it deserves the enthusiastic support from City leaders and art lovers throughout the region.”

“The history and legacy that the Asian Art Museum represents will continue to be a cultural icon for many visitors around the world for many years to come because of the steps that we are taking today,”said Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, who will sponsor the legislation and shepherd it through the Board of Supervisors.

Home to a world-renowned collection of more than 17,000 artworks spanning 6,000 years, the Asian Art Museum is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art. The Museum is governed by a public/private partnership with the Asian Art Museum Foundation serving as the organization’s private fundraising arm. To complete the construction of the Museum’s Civic Center home in the early 2000s, the Foundation adopted a common funding model: to raise funds via capital campaign, then issue bonds against the campaign commitments to finance the construction.

More recently, the Asian Art Museum Foundation found itself in technical default of bond covenants and facing the expiration of a letter of credit required to sustain the former financing arrangement. Bond rating agencies expressed concern about the Foundation’s ability to repay the bonds.

“The Asian Art Museum Foundation’s investments and debts—like many nonprofits—have been rocked in recent years by the effects of the global financial crisis,” said City Controller Ben Rosenfield. “The proposal we’ve collaboratively crafted allows the Foundation to regain its financial stability so that it can continue to generate much-needed financial support to the Museum.”

First, there is a restructuring of the rate and term of the Foundation’s bonds. JPMorgan Chase will extend a loan at a low fixed-rate of 4.60% to replace the existing variable rate bonds. Also, the term of the bonds is extended to 30 years (versus current 23 years), and a portion of the principal on the new bonds is deferred in the first two years to allow “breathing room” while the Foundation is restored to full financial health.

A second component of the proposal includes a reduction in the total loan principal and a return of funds to the Foundation. In addition to the benefits from the restructured bond’s rate and term, the Foundation receives upfront cash concessions of $21 million, thereby reducing the outstanding principal amount to $99 million from approximately $120 million, or a reduction of 17%. Also, the current Swap agreement created in 2005 is canceled and the collateral (with a current balance of $13 million) will be returned to Foundation.

The third element requires the Foundation to launch a three-year capital campaign. The first $20 million raised in new unrestricted philanthropic commitments will be required to close the gap (assuming 6.0% return). Funds raised above and beyond this amount could be used to build the museum’s endowment or fund strategic initiatives. Through the leadership of former Mayor Willie Brown, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, Mayor Gavin Newsom and Supervisor Carmen Chu, a committee of civic leaders will be recruited for a capital campaign that will bolster and broaden the Foundation’s fundraising capacity.

“On behalf of the Asian Art Museum Foundation, I express our deep gratitude to Mayor Newsom, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, Controller Ben Rosenfield, and other City officials for their leadership in facilitating a solution toward servicing the Foundation’s debt,” stated Akiko Yamazaki, President of the Asian Art Museum Foundation. “We are now well-positioned to fulfill our role in supporting the Museum’s future endeavors. The Foundation welcomes the leadership of the City in helping us achieve our goals, and we urge the Board of Supervisors to support this proposal.”

Finally, while the Foundation remains primarily responsible for debt and pledges its assets, the City would provide an assurance agreement to replace the current MBIA insurance policy for the debt. Under this proposed agreement, the City will agree to seek funding for the Foundation’s bonds under certain conditions if the Foundation does not have sufficient funds. The proposal also strengthens the working relationship between the City and Foundation to ensure the Foundation’s debt is effectively serviced. For example, the City Controller’s Office will review and offer recommendations to the Foundation’s annual budget.

“As director of the museum, I will continue to work with both City colleagues and Foundation leadership to ensure that the public enjoyment of the museum’s offerings not only continues, but broadens and deepens for years to come,” stated Jay Xu, Director of the Asian Art Museum.

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View of a gallery at the Asian Art Museum.

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Dancing Shiva, Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, 5th/6th century. Terracotta. Height: 25 cm.

NEW YORK, NY.- A wonderful selection of rare and beautiful Asian sculptures will be brought to New York by John Eskenazi for his annual New York exhibition Recent Acquisitions at Adam Williams Fine Art Ltd, from Wednesday 16 to Wednesday 30 March 2011, as part of Asian Art Dealers New York (AADNY) and coinciding with Asia Week. London-based John Eskenazi is one of the world’s most respected dealers in Indian, Gandharan, Himalayan and South-east Asian works of art.

Of particular note is a charming terracotta fragment of Dancing Shiva from 5th/6th century Eastern India, Bihar or Bengal, the date corroborated by thermoluminescence analysis. Both joyful and thoughtful, the image is one of the most easily recognised forms in Indian art and in this early example Shiva is two-armed and dances for the delight of his fellow gods. Different ear ornaments identify the god, symbolising the duality of his nature; Shiva contains male and female elements but also embodies the emotional extremes of serenity and anger. The position of Shiva’s arms evokes a sense of energy. Sculpted in high relief, the figure was originally part of a rectangular panel that occupied a ghanadvara (solid aperture) on a temple wall. The Gupta period (4th/6th century AD) has come to be regarded as a cultural Golden Age during which the art of terracotta, once associated with folk imagery, reached its zenith.

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Oil lamp finial in the form of the Kinnara, Central Java. Circa 9th/early 10th century. Bronze. Length: 25 cm

An elegant bronze figure of the half-man/half-bird kinnara once formed the principal element of a hanging oil lamp from Java, circa 9th/early 10th century. It would have stood on a platform above an oil-filled reservoir and, as the lamp moved, the light shining through the curving scrolls of his tail would have created flickering patterns on the surrounding walls. In India and South-east Asia the kinnara (male) and kinnari (female) are regarded as cheerful celestial musicians. According to Hindu beliefs, they symbolise the concept of love as their half-human, half-bird form represents the harmony that two different individuals can find together. The kinnara couple remains perpetually and uninterruptedly beloved of each other in the Himavanta, a magical forest surrounding Mount Meru (the centre of the universe). Javanese lamp finials depicting the couple seem to have been popular, perhaps in the bedchamber. It is possible this finial was from a pair of lamps with the kinnari on the companion one. A figure of the kinnari in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (Eilenberg Collection), is a possible candidate.

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Thinking Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd/early 4th century. Grey schist. Height: 51 cm

A grey schist figure of a Thinking Bodhisattva, 3rd/early 4th century, is a wonderful example of the creative powers of Gandharan sculptors. Their understanding of anatomy and familiarity with both the long-standing Hellenistic tradition and the evolving South Asian artistic conventions resulted in a uniquely beautiful form of extraordinary sensitivity, expressing a degree of emotion unusual in South Asian art. This figure was probably part of a tableau depicting a vision of the Buddhist paradise with an ensemble of acolytes surrounding a central image of the Buddha. Dressed in the finest robes and bedecked with jewellery, the Bodhisattva is a prince of Buddhism and his appearance alludes to political and social issues that devotees would have understood.

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Jambahadyah or Phagpa Lokeshvara. Nepal, Kathmandu Valley. Early Malla period, circa 14th century, wood, height 88 cm

John Eskenazi is particularly pleased to have re-acquired a fine wood figure from the Kathmandu Valley depicting Jambahadyah, known in Tibet as Phagpa Lokeshvara, an extremely rare form of the popular bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, the embodiment of compassion. Published in Arte Himalayana, Eskenazi, Milan, 1979, Jambahadyah is identified by his curious curved crown and tasselled ear ornaments and he holds his right hand in varadamudra (bestowing of boons). The Newar people of the Kathmandu Valley are famed for their craftsmanship and the sublimely modest demeanour of the figure is typical of the Kathmandu Valley style, as is his understated elegance. This sculpture dates from the early Malla period, 14th century, or possibly earlier, and its excellent state of preservation is due in part to the fact that it was once realistically painted, traces of which survive over the entire surface.

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Royal Mandala. Cambodia, Angkor Empire. Angkor Wat, mid 12th century, Bronze, height 34 cm; diameter: 28 cm

A mid-12th century bronze Royal Mandala, Cambodian, Angkor Empire, from Ankor Wat, is an enigmatic piece comprising eight identical figures seated around a larger one that dates from a period when political and religious responsibility were intrinsically joined. The central figure resembles known portraits of the founder of Angkor Wat, King Suryavarman II (1113 to circa 1150), and the mandala dates either from his reign or the period immediately following his death. The iconography cannot be ascribed to any Hindu or Buddhist belief known to have existed at Angkor and possibly represents royal authority delegated to officers of state who were bound by an oath of loyalty to the king. Like its spiritual equivalent, the mandala belongs to the sphere of secretive, long-obscure rituals conducted to maintain the status quo at the heart of the Angkor Empire.

John Eskenazi is well-known for his knowledge of the ancient cultures to which these works of art belong and his exhibitions in New York attract collectors and museum curators who are drawn to the quality and aesthetic beauty of the pieces on show. He established his own London gallery in Mayfair in 1994, having originally joined the family business of Eskenazi in 1977 which had been founded by his father Victor in Milan in the 1920s. Since 2006 John Eskenazi has been a private dealer, available to clients by appointment. His expertise and scholarship in Indian and South-east Asian art are internationally recognised and his clients include major museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London as well as discerning private collectors.

“India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow” @ LACMA

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Muhammad Azam, Portrait of Nasir al-Din Haidar, circa 1830. Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 72.1 cm. Collection Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan. Photo: Courtesy the Collection Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan.

LOS ANGELES, CA.- The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) presents India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow —the first major international exhibition devoted to the cosmopolitan culture of the northern Indian court of Lucknow, and the refined artistic production of the city’s multiethnic residents and artists. On view from December 12, 2010 through February 27, 2011, the exhibition includes almost 200 artworks: European oil paintings, watercolors, and prints; Indian opaque watercolor paintings generally made for albums, vintage photography, textiles, and garments, and a range of decorative art objects including metalwork, glassware, weaponry, and jewelry.

Organized by Stephen Markel, LACMA curator of South & Southeast Asian art and department head, and Tushara Bindu Gude, associate curator, The Art of Courtly Lucknow not only presents the unique artistic traditions of Lucknow, but also provides a framework for understanding the history of this extraordinary region and the nature of India’s colonial history and memory.

“Lucknow was the nexus point for one of the great dramas of history,” said Markel. “Not only were starkly diverse cultures competing with immense riches and political domination at stake, but the dynamic lead characters and brilliant aesthetic achievements all made for a deeply poignant era and vital artistic legacy.”

Lucknow was the capital of Awadh (a province in the Mughal Empire located in the present-day Indian state of Uttar Pradesh), and has become identified with the broader region and culture. From the mid-eighteenth century until the establishment of formal British rule in India in 1858, Lucknow overshadowed Delhi—the capital of the Mughal dynasty—to become the cultural center of northern India. Indian artists, poets, and courtiers flocked to Awadh seeking security and patronage, as Delhi suffered an extended period of unrest beginning in 1739.

European artists, travelers and political agents were also soon lured to the region, seduced by tales of the wealth, opulence, and the generosity of Lucknow’s rulers (nawabs) and by the beauty of the city itself. The dynamic interaction between Indians and Europeans, the interplay between their respective tastes and traditions, and the hybrid lives led by many of Lucknow’s residents are explored in the exhibition and accompanying publication.

The Art of Courtly Lucknow examines this interaction against the broader narrative of India’s colonial history. Following the Indian Uprising of 1857(also known as the Great Mutiny, Rebellion, or First Indian War of Independence) and the consolidation of British power in India, Lucknow’s prestige decreased dramatically. It continued, however, to be an important center for the production of luxury objects and a key destination for European and Indian visitors.

British and Indian artworks of the late nineteenth century indicate the different ways in which the image and memory of Lucknow were deployed. Many works chart the loss of diversity and the fixing of national identities and aspirations, but some also recall Lucknow’s past glory. In the popular culture of modern-day India, Lucknow has an ambiguous history. It evokes nostalgia for a lost past but is also presented as a source of national and cultural pride.

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Thomas Jones Barker, The Relief of Lucknow, 1857-1859. Oil on canvas, 105.4 x 181.3 cm. National Portrait Gallery, London, 5851 © Photo National Portrait Gallery, London

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Mir Kalan Khan, Lovers in a Landscape (Detail), India, Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow, c. 1760–70, Opaque watercolor on paper, Page 16 x 11 inches; image 8 1/4 x 6 inches, The David Collection, Copenhagen, 50/1981.

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Museum for Islamische Kunst, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany/Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz/Art Resource, NY

TreasuresInstallation

Attributed to Abu’l Hasan (India, born 1588/89, active c. 1600–1635), Emperor Jahangir (reigned 1605–1627) Triumphing Over Poverty, c. 1622, Ink, opaque water color, and gold on paper, 9 3/8 x 6 in. (23.8 x 15.2 cm), From the Nasli and Alice Heeramaneck Collection, Museum Associates Purchase, M.75.4.28.

 Deux Plats. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle @ Cornette de Saint Cyr

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Plat. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle © Cornette de Saint Cyr

A décor moulé de pivoines entourées de lignes verticales cherchant à évoquer des pétales de fleurs. Couverte céladon. D. 25,5, H. 5,5 cm. Estimation : 300 / 400 €

Retrouvé dans l’épave d’un bateau au large de l’île de Hon Dam, province de Kiên Giang, Sud Vietnam

Cf.: Vietnam Antiques Magazine (Cô Vât), No. 15, April 2006, p. 39.

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Plat. Sawankalok, Thaïlande, 15° siècle © Cornette de Saint Cyr

A décor de cercles et motifs sinueux à l’intérieur et de lignes verticales à l’extérieur. Couverte céladon. D. 25,3, H. 8,4 cm.

Retrouvé dans l’épave d’un bateau au large de l’île de Hon Dam, province de Kien Giang Sud Vietnam

Cf. : Vietnam Antiques Magazine (Cô Vât), No. 4, December 2003, p. 18

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Lundi 29 novembre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL ( +33 6 09 22 55 13). Consultant Philippe TRUONG ( +33 6 31 34 40 59). Drouot Richelieu – Salle 7 – 9, rue Drouot – 75009 Paris. Pour tout renseignement , veuillez contacter Laura Cristau au : +33 1 47 27 11 24

 Tête de lion en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, XIIe siècle.

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Tête de lion  en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, XIIe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

la crinière finement sculptée, les oreilles dressées et la gueule ouverte laissant apparaître ses crocs. H : 35 cm – Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Pierre Bergé & associés. Orient – Extrême Orient. Lundi 15 novembre à 14h00. Drouot-Richelieu – Salle 7 – Paris. EMail : contact@pba-auctions.com

 

Tête de Garuda en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, Angkor, XIIe siècle.

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Tête de Garuda en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, Angkor, XIIe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

coiffé d’un haut diadème richement décoré de fleurs, les yeux grands ouverts exorbitants, les oreilles parées de bijoux. H : 23 cm – Estimation : 10 000 / 12 000 €

Torse de divinité masculine en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, style de Koh-Ker, deuxième quart du Xe siècle.

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Torse de divinité masculine en grès gris, Cambodge, art khmer, style de Koh-Ker, deuxième quart du Xe siècle. photo courtesy Pierre Bergé & associés

vêtu d’un sampot plissé à double chute en ancre antérieure et dont le bord supérieur est rabattu à l’avant. H : 170 cm – Estimation : 150 000 / 200 000 €

Provenance : Succession José Garnier 1968 ; Collection Privée Belge.

Référence : Statue de Vajimurka/Hayagriva avec vêtement similaire reproduit dans « Angkor. Göttilches Erbe Kambodschas », catalogue d’exposition du 15/12/2006 au 09/04/2007 à la Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland à Bonn, n°39, p. 121.
Un autre modèle de Vajimukha/Hayagriva de style Prè Rup conservé au Musée Guimet, Paris, réf. MG 18099.
Le vêtement et la posture légèrement rigide, ainsi que sa taille importante de ce torse est typique du style Koh-Ker.

Notes: L’empire khmer est fondé par Jayavarman II en 802.
Son successeur Indravarman Il entreprend des travaux d’irrigation importants servant de base à la prospérité du royaume khmer.
Ce système d’exploitation intensif des sols pour en faire des rizières fera du peuple khmer une des civilisations les plus développées de l’Antiquité.
En un siècle, sous modèle indonésien, la civilisation khmère unifie son pays et acquiert une notoriété remarquable en Asie du Sud-est.
La production importante de céréales permet à une grande partie de la population de se consacrer entièrement à la construction de temples et à développer leur religion, dans un premier temps l’hindouisme, puis le vishnouisme et le bouddhisme.
Ainsi naît un nombre considérable de temples-montagnes autour d’Angkor, la capitale du royaume khmer.
Ces temples-montagnes, construits sur des collines naturelles, sont des représentations du Mont Meru, le centre de l’Univers et le séjour des dieux dans la cosmologie indienne.
La statuaire khmère est à son apogée au Xe et XIe siècle, on peut trouver des pièces de tailles impressionnantes et d’une finesse extrêmement soignée.
Chaque roi fait de sa religion une religion d’état, ainsi sous Jayavarman IIe au IXe siècle il s’agit de l’hindouisme, sous Sûryavarman IIe au XIIe siècle le vishnouisme, sous Jayavarman VII le bouddhisme mahâyâna.
Ces différentes religions font office de miroir de la société de l’époque.
Angkor Thom est le dernier exploit de ce peuple riche en culture et en savoir.
Mais les khmers sont victimes de leur propre grandeur et de l’épuisement de ressources, ainsi que de la force de l’empire thaï qui commence à s’étendre dans toute l’Asie du Sud-Est.
Ainsi s’achève la grande période prospère du Cambodge.

Three dagger, Mughal India, 18th century @ Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd, Asian Art in London

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A gem-set rock crystal-hilted dagger. Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

43 cm. With slightly curving watered steel blade, the hilt set with rows of gemstones including rubies and emeralds set in gold – Price on request

Provenance : Warren Anderson collection, Australia, 1980s-1992;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1407;
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Published : Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1407 (illustrated in colour)

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A gem-set and gold-inlaid jade-hilted dagger. Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

39 cm. dagger; 41.5 cm. with scab. With curving watered steel blade, the white jade hilt inlaid with floral decoration set with emeralds and rubies; the red velvet-covered scabbard with gold repoussé chape and locket. Price on request

Provenance : Warren Anderson collection, Australia;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1315;
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Exhibited : Splendeur des Armes Orientales, 4 May – 31 July 1988, page 112, Paris, 1988

Published : Philippe Missillier and Howard Ricketts, Splendeur des Armes Orientales, 4 May – 31 July 1988, page 112, Paris, 1988.

Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1311 (illustrated in colour)

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A rock crystal-hilted dagger, Mughal India, 18th century © Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd.

41.5 cm. With curving watered steel blade, the hilt carved with floral and foliate decoration on either side, with curving pommel. Price on request

Provenance : Lord McAlpine of West Green, London, 1980s, inventory number M.5217;
Warren Anderson collection, Australia, 1980s-1992;
Sold, Butterfield & Butterfield, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1313
Private collection, U.S.A., 1992-2009.

Published : Butterfield & Butterfield, The Warren Anderson Collection of Premier American & European Firearms – Part II, San Francisco, 14 July 1992, lot 1313 (illustrated in colour)

Padmapani. Basalte. Inde. (Bengale / Bihar) ca 12° siècle

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Padmapani. Basalte. Inde. (Bengale-Bihar) ca 12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 32 cm – Estimation : 3 000 / 5 000 €

Cette petite stèle est ornée en son centre d’une représentation de l’aspect “porteur de lotus” d’Avalokitesvara le bodhisattva de la compassion assis en ardhaparyanka sur un socle lotiforme soutenu par sa tige émergeant des eaux primordiales.
Sa main gauche tient le lotus éponyme, et la droite fait le geste de don, varadhamudra.
Il est entouré par un couple d’attendants.
Le registre inférieur est sculpté d’un personnage agenouillé, peut-être le donateur, et d’offrandes.
Un stupa est stylisé au sommet de la stèle. Quelques restaurations visibles.

Provenance  Collection de Madame A.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Devi. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Devi. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 31 cm. Petits accidents et manques visibles –

Superbe représentation d’une divinité féminine richement parée, assise dans une superbe attitude déhanchée, présentant une fleur dans la paume de sa main droite.
La synthèse des éléments stylistiques de cette œuvre permet de la rapprocher des archétypes de la statuaire féminine de la période Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

Parsvanatha. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Uttar Pradesh). 9° siècle.

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Parsvanatha. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Uttar Pradesh). 9° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 80 cm. Accidents et manques visibles. Estimation : 50 000 / 75 000 €

Cette remarquable et importante sculpture présente le jina Parsvanatha, nu, le classique ornement srivatsa marquant sa poitrine, assis en méditation dans l’attitude du lotus (vajraparyankasana), les mains posées dans son giron en dhyana mudra, la tête encore partiellement abritée par les restes d’un capuchon de naga.
La pointe de la queue du roi-serpent passe sous le corps du jina et vient retomber sur le devant su socle.
Cette particularité iconographique fait référence à l’épisode au cours duquel il pratiquait une forme de méditation sous un dhataki et où Samvara déclenche une tempête pour l’interrompre.
Le nagaraja Dharanendra vient alors déployer son capuchon au dessus de sa tête pour l’abriter et lui permettre de poursuivre sa méditation.
Le sculpteur de cette importante représentation a parfaitement su allier la classique rigueur des lignes et des volumes du corps caractéristiques de l’esthétique jaïne à une expression rayonnante du visage accentuée par la disposition des écailles du corps du serpent.
L’intérêt de cette sculpture est encore renforcé par une inscription gravée sur le socle mentionnant la date Samvat 922, correspondant aux années 865/866 de notre ère si l’on tient compte de l’ère Vikrama en vigueur alors en Inde du Nord.

 

Buddha. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Buddha. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 23 cm – Estimation : 8 000 / 10 000 €

Plaque de parement ornée d’une figure du Buddha assis en vajraparyankasana (attitude du lotus).
En dépit d’accidents et de manques visibles, on notera le beau modelé du corps, des pieds et du visage qui sont totalement caractéristiques de l’esthétique Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

Scènes de la vie du Buddha. Schiste. Art du Gandhara. ca 2°-4° siècles

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Scènes de la vie du Buddha. Schiste. Art du Gandhara. ca 2°-4° siècles. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 40 cm –

Ce bel ornement architectural reprenant la forme classique de l’arc indien (kudu), présente trois épisodes de la vie du Buddha.
Au registre inférieur, on peut identifier la “grand départ”, évasion du Buddha du palais de son père, monté sur son cheval.
Au dessus, il est figuré en méditation entouré d’adorants, et le cartouche supérieur nous le présente debout, la main droite en varadamudra, la gauche redressée, maintenant le retour de l’uttarasanga .
Cet élément est tout à fait caractéristique du style communément qualifié de “gréco-bouddhique” tel qu’il s’est développé dans le nord-ouest de l’empire Kusan

Provenance : Collection Européenne

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Tête anthropomorphe. Terre cuite.. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle

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Tête anthropomorphe. Terre cuite. Inde du Nord-Est ou Bangladesh. ca 6° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 20,5 cm. Petits accidents et manques visibles.

Très belle et imposante tête de personnage présentant une riche coiffure bouclée, et une superbe asymétrie au niveau des l’ornementation des oreilles.
La lèvre inférieure est ourlée.
Tous ces éléments sont caractéristiques des meilleurs exemples plastiques de l’esthétique de la période Gupta.

Provenance : Collection privée Européenne

Cette sculpture est accompagnée d’une analyse de thermoluminescence, au résultat cohérent avec la datation proposée.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Divinités attendantes. Grès. Inde Centrale ca 8° / 10° siècle

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Divinités attendantes. Grès. Inde Centrale ca 8° – 10° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 57 cm. Anciens accidents et rebouchages visibles – Estimation : 5 000 / 8 000 €

Ce couple de divinités est figuré debout dans l’attitude classique de la triple flexion (tribhanga).
Les deux brandissent de leur main gauche un attribut assez délicat à définir avec précision, probablement une fleur.
Entre les deux, se tient une petite divinité féminine tenant un attribut également délicat à interpréter.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Devati. Grès. Inde. (Uttar Pradesh) ca 10°-12° siècle

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Devati. Grès. Inde. (Uttar Pradesh) ca 10°-12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 55 cm – Estimation : 6 000 / 10 000 €

Cette belle représentation d’un personnage à quatre bras, debout dans l’attitude de la triple flexion (tribhanga), est assez inhabituelle.
Une de ses mains droites maintient une tige de lotus sortant d’un vase reposant sur le sol.
Ses deux mains gauches portent un vase à eau (kamandalu) et probablement ce qu’il reste d’une fleur de lotus ou d’un serpent au capuchon déployé.
L’association du kamandalu, vase des ascètes et d’un potentiel serpent, permettrait de relier cette rare et belle image à un contexte sivaïte.
Ce type de grés rouge moucheté est généralement considéré comme caractéristique de la région de Mathura en Uttar Pradesh.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Varuna. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Rajasthan), ca 11°-12° siècle

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Varuna. Grès rose. Inde (probablement Rajasthan), ca 11°-12° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 67 cm – Estimation : 10 000 / 15 000 €

Cette divinité figurée debout entre deux colonnes dans un superbe tribhanga (attitude de triple flexion) avait initialement quatre bras. Sa main restante maintient un lien (pasa) formant un nœud complexe.
A ses pieds, on eut voir la gueule d’un makara, le monstre marin mythologique à forme complexe essentiellement identifiable sa trompe.
L’association du pasa comme attribut et du makara permettent d’envisager que nous puissions être en présence d’un aspect de Varuna.
Varuna serait depuis les temps védiques durant lesquels il était l’esprit du “ciel étoilé”, associé au cosmos qui nous entoure.
Il fait office de gardien de l’ordre céleste.
Etant également celui qui entend tout, il fait fonction de garant des serments en liant les hommes avec son “lacet magique”.
Il fait également office de gardien de la direction de l’Ouest.
Egalement dieu des eaux souterraines et maître des créatures marines, il est souvent flanqué des deux déesses fluviales Ganga et Yamuna

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

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Visnu. Grès rose. Inde. (Probablement Rajasthan). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 56,5 cm – Estimation : 15 000 / 20 000 €

Ce beau relief présente un aspect classique de Visnu, debout dans l’attitude de la triple flexion (tribhanga), sur un lotus épanoui, sous une arcature soutenue par deux colonnes.
De ses quatre mains, il tient ses attributs classiques, la fleur de lotus (qui symboliserait l’esprit pur), la conque (les cinq éléments), la massue (l’intelligence) et le disque (la pensée).
De part et d’autre des colonnes, il est entouré de divinités célestes féminines porteuses de cauri (chasse mouches), en mouvement.
Au registre supérieur on peut observer une personne adorante et probablement une nagini protégée par un calotte de cobra à plusieurs têtes.
On notera le très beau rendu classique de la souplesse des corps sur cette sculpture.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Skanda, Kumara et Uma. Grès. Inde. (probablement Madhya Pradesh) ca 11° siècle

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Skanda, Kumara et Uma. Grès. Inde. (probablement Madhya Pradesh) ca 11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 74 cm – Estimation : 20 000 / 25 000 €

Ce superbe relief dans lequel le sculpteur tente clairement de s’affranchir de l’art frontal de la stèle pour tenter d’aller vers la ronde bosse dans une remarquable dynamique nous présente trois personnages, deux femmes debout, et un plus petit assis, à priori un enfant.
Ce dernier est assis en position de délassement (ardhaparyanka), sur le dos d’un oiseau semblant dévorer des serpents.
Sa coiffure marquée de trois mèches hautes sur l’arrière (trisira) permet de confirmer son identification en tant que Skanda, fils de Siva, dieu de la guerre, eternel adolescent dont la monture (vahana), est un paon tueur de serpents du nom de Paravani.
Il brandit de sa main gauche une arme inhabituelle oscillant entre le boomerang et la lance, qui est censée ne jamais manquer sa cible.
La mythologie de Skanda, également appelé Kumara ou Karttikeya, en référence au fait qu’il aurait été élevé par les pléiades, est très ancienne et complexe.
Les femmes sont exclues de son culte car il est le symbole de l’abstinence sexuelle.
Derrière lui, se tient une déesse debout portant une fleur de lotus dans chacune de ses mains, indiquant qu’il s’agit très probablement de sa mère Uma.
Une attendante est projetée vers l’avant, se retournant sur sa gauche pour regarder l’Image de Siva qui devait initialement occuper le centre de la stèle dont cet élément devait constituer la base du montant gauche du parikarma.
En pendant, devaient se trouver une autre attendante, Ganesa le second fils de Siva et Parvati sa mère, autre aspect d’ Uma.
A l’arrière plan, il faut remarquer un beau registre de rinceaux de lotus, la tête d’un éléphant, et la partie inférieure du corps d’un Vyala.
De par ses qualités et certains éléments stylistiques, cette superbe sculpture peut être attribuée aux artistes de l’ancien royaume Haihaya dont de nombreux vestiges sont encore visibles au Madhya Pradesh

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Ganesa dansant. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle

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Ganesa dansant. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 57 cm. Accidents, manques et fractures visibles. Estimation : 8 000 / 12 000 €

Ganesa est ici représenté debout, dans une attitude de danse, et arborant trois paires de bras.
Le passage du temps a effacé ou rendu délicats à interpréter les attributs initialement reliés à chacune de ses mains, seules les deux supérieures maintiennent clairement un serpent formant un arc au dessus de sa tête.
Cette façon de saisir ainsi un serpent, symbole sivaïte par excellence, est sans nul doute également destinée à faire écho à la peau d’éléphant parfois brandie par Siva.
A sa gauche, au pied d’une colonne est figuré un personnage assis dans la position caractéristique de nombreux ascètes sivaïtes.
De telles représentations de Ganesa dansant constituent sans nul doute un puissant écho aux fameuses représentations de Siva Nataraja (roi de la danse) effectuant sa danse cosmique de création et destruction du monde.
Les sculptures présentant cette iconographie auraient initialement été placées à l’extérieur au sud des sanctuaires afin d’être une des premières images vues par les dévots venant exécuter leurs circumambulations

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

 Tête de Bhairava. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle

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Tête de Bhairava. Grès. Inde. (Probablement Uttar Pradesh). ca 10°-11° siècle. photo courtesy Cornette de Saint Cyr

H. : 27 cm. Accidents, manques et quelques rebouchages visibles. Estimation : 6 000 / 10 000 €

Très belle tête, présentant Siva dans toute sa plénitude, avec une courte barbe et une moustache entourant une bouche aux commissures des lèvres creusées pour indiquer une tension.
Ses yeux sont sculptés d’une manière plus globuleuse que la normale.
Un troisième œil vertical marque son front.
La coiffure est nattée en un chignon vertical maintenu à sa base par un diadème orné de têtes de morts.
Tous ces éléments constituent les conventions iconographiques les plus classiques des représentations de Bhairava, un des aspects farouches majeurs de Siva. Bhairava serait un aspect terrible de Siva apparu après qu’il ait décapité Brahma, “le Créateur”.
Poursuivi par le remord, il erre tel un ascète avec le crâne de Brahma fixé à sa main en guise de bol à aumône jusqu’à ce que celui-ci ne se détache en parvenant à Varanasi, au moment où d’un saut, il dépasse le Temps (Kala) qui était en lui, devient Mahakala (le Temps transcendant), et alors que le temps disparaît, devient Bhairava.
Avec une claire opposition entre l’apparente rondeur, voire douceur du contour du visage et les signes distinctifs de la divinité terrible, cette œuvre constitue un bon témoignage du talent des artistes indiens pour transcender la pierre et donner vie à l’ambivalence caractéristique de Siva.

Cornette de Saint Cyr – Paris. Vente du Vendredi 29 octobre 2010. Expert Jean-Luc ESTOURNEL: 06 09 22 55 13. Drouot Montaigne – 15, av Montaigne – 75008 Paris. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez contacter Laura CRISTAU au 01 47 27 11 24

Protected: The Korean Ceramic And Artwork Exhibition

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Protected: The Vintage British Wochester Ceramic Collections

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The Masterpiece Of Chinese Imperial Ceramic And Artwork Collections

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

THE MASTERPIECE OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CERAMIC AND ARTWORK  COLLECTIONS

 

A peach bloom glazed porcelain beehive water pot & a celadon glazed porcelain bottle vase with carved decoration. Kangxi Period

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A peach bloom glazed porcelain beehive water pot. Kangxi Mark and Period.  Photo Bonhams

Its curving exterior walls incised with three dragon roundels and covered with a mottled rosy-red layer exhibiting patches of faint green beneath the celadon-tinged glaze covering the interior and the base centered with the underglaze blue six-character mark in two rows of regular script, the original mouth and neck replaced by a metal band mount; 5in (12.5cm) diameter. Estimate: US$5,000 – 7,000

Property Formerly from the Daibutsu Gallery, San Francisco, California

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A celadon glazed porcelain bottle vase with carved decoration. Kangxi Period.  Photo Bonhams

Potted with a flared rim to the long neck encircled by a band of overlapping petals while the globular body displays a single chilong striding across a ground of lingzhi fungus and leaf scrolls, the celadon glaze extending from the top of the neck to the exterior of the spreading foot and a colorless glaze appearing on the interior neck and the deeply recessed base displaying an artemesia leaf mark within a double ring drawn in underglaze blue.: 8in (20.5cm) high. Estimate: US$3,000 – 5,000

Property from the Collection of J. Lester Jervis

A Ming blue and white bottle vase. Jiajing period (1522-1566)

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A Ming blue and white bottle vase. Jiajing period (1522-1566). Photo Christies Ltd 2011

Painted around the pear-shaped body with large lotus flowers with feathery petals borne on leafy meandering scrolls, all above a lappet band at the foot, the shoulder with a wide band enclosing a stylised leafy scrolls, the base with a four-character inscription reading ‘yong bao chang chun‘; 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) high. Estimate £10,000 – £15,000 ($16,710 – $25,065)

Notes: Yong bao chang chun may be translated as ‘Eternal life and everlasting spring’.

Blue and White ‘Lotus’ Guan Jar, ‘Dragon’ bottle vase & Qingbai Ewer and Cover. Yuan Dynasty

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A rare large Blue and White ‘Lotus’ Guan Jar. Late Yuan-Early Ming dynasties. Photo Sotheby’s

robustly potted in ovoid form with a short splayed neck set with a slightly everted rim flange, boldly painted in a dark, greyish cobalt blue with a broad stylised lotus scroll around the centre, with six large blooms alternating in full view and in profile among dense scrolling foliage and attendant buds, set between pendent and upright petal lappets draping the shoulder and skirting the waist, the shoulder lappets containing Buddhist and other auspicious emblems supported on lotus flowers, the lappets below with further emblems alternating with lotus sprays, all below a knobbed classic scroll collaring neck and a lingzhi scroll around the foot; 50.5 cm., 19 7/8 in. Estimate 8,000,000—12,000,000 HKD. Lot Sold 9,620,000 HKD

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES: Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyintang Collection, London, 1994-2010, vol. 4, no. 1623.

NOTE: The style of this lotus scroll with its dense frilly petals and curling foliage, as well as the solid construction of the jar and the colour of the cobalt blue all suggest a date very late in the Yuan or early in the Ming dynasty, in the Hongwu period. Altogether, the painting style seems closer to Yuan dynasty prototypes than to the fully developed Hongwu designs, which tend to be more strictly composed and executed in a paler cobalt blue, and would seem to represent a different stage in the development of blue and white porcelain.

A companion piece to this highly unusual jar from the Au Bak Ling collection, sold in these rooms 3rd May 1994, lot 33, was included in the exhibition 100 Masterpieces of Imperial Chinese Ceramics from the Au Bakling Collection, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1998.

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An important Blue and White ‘Dragon’ bottle vase. Yuan Dynasty. Photo Sotheby’s

the pear-shaped body rising to a slender neck and a wide flaring rim, counterbalanced by a splayed footring, freely painted in dark cobalt blue with a three-clawed striding dragon, its head with elaborate horns gazing up at a flaming pearl, the sinuous body wrapped around the entire vessel with spikes along the spine and cross-hatched scales, the inner mouthrim painted with a ‘classic’ scroll border, the base glazed save for the unglazed footring revealing a yellowish-beige body; 24.7 cm., 9 3/4 in. Estimate 8,000,000—12,000,000 HKD. Lot Sold 9,620,000 HKD

PROVENANCE: Collection of Charles E. Russell, London (until 1936, one of two vases) .
Sotheby’s London, 12th February 1936, offered for purchase together with its companion, lot 75, while on display at the Royal Academy of Arts.
Collection of Mrs. Alfred Clark (1936 until the 1970s, one of two vases).
Mayuyama & Co, Ltd, Tokyo.
Private Collection, Japan.
J.J. Lally & Co., New York.

EXHIBITED: International Exhibition of Chinese Art, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1935-6, cat. no. 1434 (illustrated).
Ming Blue-and-White Porcelain, Oriental Ceramic Society, London, 1946, cat. no. 2.
Chinese Blue and White Porcelain: 14th to 19th Centuries, Oriental Ceramic Society at the Arts Council Gallery, London, 1953-4, cat. no. 1 (illustrated).
Mostra d’Arte Cinese/Exhibition of Chinese Art, Palazzo Ducale, Venice, 1954, cat. no. 600 (illustrated).
The British Museum, London, 1955 (according to label; probably on loan).
Tōyō no sometsuke/Far Eastern Blue-and-White Porcelain, Mitsukoshi, Tokyo, 1977, cat. no. 12 (illustrated).
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (1980s, on loan).

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES: Jean Gordon Lee, ‘Some Pre-Ming “Blue-and-White”, Archives of the Chinese Art Society in America, vol. VI, 1952, p. 38, pl. IV, fig. c.
Soame Jenyns, Ming Pottery and Porcelain, London and Boston, 1988 (1953), pl. 12.
Sir Harry Garner, Oriental Blue and White, London, 1973 (1954), pl. 3.
Margaret Medley, Yüan Porcelain and Stoneware, London, 1974, pl. 25.
Sōgyō Shichijūnen Kinen Ryūsen Shūhō/Mayuyama, Seventy Years, Tokyo, 1976, pl. 696.
Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyintang Collection, London, 1994-2010, vol. 4, no. 1620.

NOTE: This vase with its lively, freely painted dragon is an iconic piece of Yuan blue and white, as is testified by its illustrious provenance from the Charles Russell and Alfred Clark collection, the impressive list of exhibitions in which it featured – including the ground-breaking International Exhibition of Chinese Art in London 1935-6 and the seminal Marco Polo Seventh Centenary exhibition in Venice 1954 – and the renowned experts who wrote about it, among them Soame Jenyns, Harry Garner and Margaret Medley.

The vase shared part of its history with a companion piece painted, probably by the same hand, with an almost identical dragon, but with a prunus branch and crescent moon inside the rim. This second vase, later in the Ataka collection and now in the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, (fig. 1) was included together with the present vase in the Oriental Ceramic Society exhibition 1953-4, op.cit., cat. no. 2, and is illustrated, for example, in Ye Peilan, Yuandai ciqi [Porcelain of the Yuan dynasty], Beijing, 1998, pl. 91. Another vase with a similar dragon and also with a classic scroll inside the rim, in the National Museum of China, Beijing, is published in Peng Qingyun, ed., Zhongguo wenwu jinghua daquan: Taoci juan [Complete masterpieces of Chinese cultural relics: Ceramics volume], Taipei, 1993, p. 328, no. 535; and a fragmentary vase with plain rim, excavated near Chifeng, Inner Mongolia, is published in the exhibition catalogue Empires Beyond the Great Wall. The Heritage of Genghis Khan, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, 1994, p. 141, fig. 91. Fragments of similar vases, probably discovered at Jingdezhen, are also illustrated and their production methods discussed in Huang Yunpeng, ed., Yuan qinghua yanjiu [Research on Yuan blue and white], Shanghai, 2006, p. 10, fig. 4, and p. 256, col. pl. 3.

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A rare Qingbai Ewer and Cover. Yuan Dynasty. Photo Sotheby’s

well potted, the pear-shaped body rising to a tall flared neck, supported on a splayed foot with a prominent flange, the body set with a slender curved spout issuing from the mouth of a dragon, connected to the body by an elaborate S-shaped bridge, set opposite with a curved handle formed by the scaly body of a fish-dragon with the opened mouth swallowing the top of the handle, its mane forming a small loop for attaching the cover, its tail fanning out into a large trefoil motif applied in relief, the body decorated on either side with a phoenix in flight with upturned scrolling tail and a cloud motif, cut from thin sheets of clay and applied with incised details, above a band of upright lappets containing ruyi heads, the neck collared by a key-fret band of pearl strings and slip-painted upright petal lappets containing scroll motifs, all beneath an icy blue-green transparent glaze, fitted with a stepped domed cover and a small eyelet for attachment to the ewer, surmounted by a seated lion delicately modelled with a thick beard, long mane, and bushy tail bent to one side, its left foreleg resting on a ball with thin freely modelled ribbons and a bell tied around its neck, overall 34 cm., 13 3/8 in. Estimate 1,200,000—1,500,000 HKD. Lot Sold  4,220,000 HKD

PROVENANCE: Messrs John Sparks, London.
Collection of Mr and Mrs Otto Doering, Snr.
Christie’s New York, 9th November 1978, lot 125.
J.J. Lally & Co., New York.

EXHIBITED: The Art Institute of Chicago (on loan).
Chinese Porcelain and Silver in the Song Dynasty, J. J. Lally & Co., New York, 2002, cat. no. 30 (illustrated).

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES: John Ayers, ‘Some Characteristic Wares of the Yüan Dynasty’, Transactions of the Oriental Ceramic Society, vol. 29, 1954-5, pl. 38, fig. 17.
Margaret Medley, Yüan Porcelain and Stoneware, London, 1974, pl. 10.
Anthony du Boulay, Christie’s Pictorial History of Chinese Ceramics, London, 1984, p. 110, fig. 1.
Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyintang Collection, London, 1994-2010, vol. 4, no. 1614.

NOTE: This ewer reflects the quest for richer ornamentation in the second half of the Yuan dynasty, which eventually was satisfied by the introduction of underglaze painting in colour. It shows the remarkably wide repertoire of decoration techniques experimented with at the time, such as moulding, incising, slip painting, dotted surface structuring, application of clay sheets, freely modelled motifs and pearl strings.

A very similar ewer without cover in the Tokyo National Museum is published in Yutaka Mino, Chūgoku no tōji. Hakuji/Chinese Ceramics. White Porcelain, Tokyo, 1998, col. pl. 79, perhaps the piece illustrated also in Mikami Tsugio, ed., Sekai tōji zenshū/Ceramic Art of the World, vol. 13, Tokyo, 1981, col. pl. 42. A simpler version of this design, perhaps made somewhat earlier than the present ewer, was among the porcelains recovered from the shipwreck off Shinan, Korea, which can be dated to AD 1323; that ewer has a similar phoenix design in relief, but is lacking any applied motifs and has a plain spout, handle and cover; see Relics Salvaged from the Seabed off Sinan. Materials I, Seoul, 1985, pl. 67. A similar smaller ewer without cover, from the collection of a Vietnamese Princess, was sold at Christie’s New York, 22nd April 1999, lot 256.

A pair of meiping vases with similar, but perhaps also somewhat simpler lion covers, excavated from a tomb of AD 1324 in Wannian county, Jiangxi province, is published in Wenwu 1977, no. 4, pl. 9, fig. 5. A fragment of a similar ewer, excavated from a Yuan city site in Inner Mongolia, is published in Chen Yongzhi, ed., Nei Menggu Jininglu gu cheng yizhi chutu ciqi/Porcelain Unearthed from Jininglu Ancient City Site in Inner Mongolia, Beijing, 2004, p. 20, fig. 13; and a similar fragment of a dragon handle, excavated from the Yuan remains at Luomaqiao, Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province, in Ceramic Finds from Jingdezhen Kilns (10th – 17th Century), Fung Ping Shan Museum, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 1992, cat. no. 116.

Sotheby’s. The Meiyintang Collection – An Important Selection of Imperial Chinese Porcelains, 07 Apr 11, Hong Kong www.sothebys.com

A Langyao-red bottle asty, Kangxi period.

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A Langyao-red bottle vase. Qing dynasty, Kangxi period. Photo Sotheby’s

the globular body rising to a tall cylindrical neck, covered overall in a thick bright raspberry-red glaze, streaking slightly down the sides and pooling just above the neatly trimmed tapering foot, the glaze further suffuse.d with a tight network of crackles, the base applied with a crackled straw glaze; 42 cm., 16 1/2 in  Estimate 400,000—600,000 HKD. Lot Sold 500,000 HKD

PROVENANCE: Yamanaka & Co., no. 2 (according to label).
Sotheby’s New York, 4th June 1982, lot 228

Chinese celadon-glazed & Ru-type vases from a Palm Beach Private Collector

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A Chinese celadon-glazed bottle vase. Qing dynasty, 18th- 19th century. photo Sotheby’s

the bulbous body tapering to a slender neck and a molded garlic-head mouth, all covered in an even pale celadon glaze; height 11 in. 28 cm. Estimate 15,000—25,000 USD. Lot Sold 68,500 USD

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A Chinese Ru-type bottle vase. Qing dynasty, 18th- 19th century. photo Sotheby’s

covered in a rich gray-blue glaze suffused with fine yellow-brown crackling, the foot dressed in brown; height 11 1/4 in. 28.6 cm. Estimate 10,000—15,000 USD. Lot Sold 34,375 USD

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A Chinese Ru-type pear-shaped vase. Qing dynasty, 18th- 19th century. photo Sotheby’s

covered in a smoky lavender-blue glaze, the foot dressed in brown; height 8 1/2 in. 21.7 cm. Estimate 8,000—12,000 USD. Lot Sold 20,000 USD

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A Chinese celadon-glazed Vase.. Qing dynasty, Kangxi period. photo Sotheby’s

the body incised with scrolling lotus beneath a narrow band of inverted triangles and ruyi-heads around the neck; height 9 3/4 in. 24.8 cm. Estimate 4,000—6,000 USD. Lot Sold 12,500 USD

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A Chinese celadon-glazed Baluster Vase.. Qing dynasty, Kangxi period. photo Sotheby’s

incised with a band of scrolling lotus beneath a narrow border of inverted triangles around the neck; height 10 in. 25 4 cm. Estimate 4,000—6,000 USD. Lot Sold 10,000 USD

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A Chinese celadon vase.. Late Ming-Qing dynasty. photo Sotheby’s

molded with peonies and foliage between lappet borders at the rim and foot, the glaze suffused overall with a fine crackle; height 13 3/4 in., 35 cm. Estimate 2,000—3,000 USD. Lot Sold 8,125 USD

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A Chinese celadon Baluster Vase.. Late Ming-Qing dynasty. photo Sotheby’s

carved with peonies and foliage above a band of incised stiff leaves; height 13 in., 33 cm. Estimate 2,000—3,000 USD. Lot Sold 5,313 USD

Kangxi Blue and White @ Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

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Blue and White ‘Bacchus’ Charger. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 37,5 cm. Price on request

Provenance: private collection, Belgium

A rare large charger decorated with a Western mythological scene of Dionysus, or Bacchus, the Greco-Roman god of wine and merriment. Because of these connotations, he was a favoured symbol for the dining room. Further European influence can be seen in the gadrooned rim, which was copied from silver models. Similar chargers are in the Victoria & Albert Museum (London) and the Hodroff Collection (USA).

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Large Five Piece Garniture. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 64 cm – Price on request

Provenance: Dutch noble family, since the early 18th century

Five-piece garnitures were used as decoration in grand European houses throughout the 18th century. Made in China as separate items, garnitures were formed in Europe by combining covered jars and vases. Large garnitures were often part of private orders made by higher ranking members of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). Until now, this garniture has been in the same Dutch family collection since the early 18th Century.

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Blue and White Bottle Vase.China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 24 cm – Price on request

Provenance: private collection, France

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Underglaze Blue Bowl. China, Kangxi Mark & Period (1662-1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 14,3 cm. Price: € 17.500,-

Provenance: Private Collection Germany

The eight trigrams, or bagua, are mystical symbols comprising of long and short horizontal lines. They symbolize the different aspects of nature between heaven (long lines) and earth (short lines). Other decorations used are waves, rocks, clouds and cranes, all typical Taoist emblems.

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Blue and White Box and Cover. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 11,5 cm  – Price: € 9.500,-

Provenance: Bos collection, The Netherlands

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Two Handled Cup With Cover. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 18,5 cm – Price: € 8.500,-

Provenance: Augustus the Strong collection, Germany, Inventory Number: N=181 VVV

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Blue and White Ewer with Cover. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Silver mounts of the period marked Amsterdam 1720. Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 15 cm – Price: € 7.500,-

Provenance: Simons collection, the Netherlands

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Islamic Jar and Cover. China, Kangxi period (1662-1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 7,5 cm – Price € 4.500,-

Provenance: Lieberman collection, United Kingdom

Although Chinese and the Ottoman Empires seemed far apart in ancient times, an abundance Chinese treasures in the Topkapi Palace Museum (Istanbul) stand proof for their long-term trading relationship. This small jar and cover is an excellent example of Chinese porcelain made for the middle eastern market.

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Calligraphy Brush Cap. China, Kangxi period (1662-1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Height: 13,5 cm – Price € 4.500,-

Provenance: Lieberman collection, United Kingdom

During the Ming and Qing Dynasties in China, the scholars were highly regarded in Chinese society. Many beautiful items, made from luxurious materials, were used to adorn the scholar’s desk. Among these, a special place was reserved for the brush itself. This object is probably the cap for a porcelain brush – a rare and expensive material only affordable for the very few.

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Blue and White Plate. China, Kangxi period (1662-1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 39,5cm – Price: €4.500,00

Provenance: Collectie van Middelkoop Netherlands.

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Blue and White Plate. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 27 cm – Price: € 3.800,-

Provenance: Wiltox-Bogaers collection, The Netherlands

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Blue and White Dish. China, Kangxi period (1662 – 1722). Courtesy Vanderven & Vanderven Oriental Art

Diameter: 26,5 cm – Price: € 3.500,-

Provenance: Bos collection, The Netherlands

A pair of Chinese Export Famille-Verte powder-blue-ground bottle vases, Kangxi period, early 18th century

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A pair of Chinese Export Famille-Verte powder-blue-ground bottle vases, Kangxi period, early 18th century. photo Sotheby’s

reserved with panels of objects and flowering plants. height 8 1/2 in., 21.6 cm – Estimate 5,000—7,000 USD. Lot Sold 3,125 USD

A Chinese porcelain blue and white bottle vase. Chongzhen, 1628-1644.

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A Chinese porcelain blue and white bottle vase. Chongzhen, 1628-1644. Courtesy Marchant

of compressed globular form with tall flaring neck and central bulb, painted on the body with a dignitary meeting a lady in a fenced garden, the gentleman with three attendants, one holding a canopy, the other a halbard and a third with an axe, all amongst rockwork, banana plants and “V”-shaped grass, the reverse with a cloud bank beneath cloud scrolls and the moon, the shoulder with a continuous band of flowering asters amongst foliage, the neck with stylised tulip divided by lotus flower-heads and foliage on the bulb. 14 5/8 inches, 37.1cm high. Condition: Rim restored. Price on request.

• Formerly in the collection of Professor D. R. Laurence.

• Purchased from S. Marchant & Son, 9th February 2007.

• A similar vase was included by S. Marchant & Son in their exhibition of Ming Blue and White Porcelain: The Drs. A. M. Sengers Collection, no. 72, p. 99; another was included by S. Marchant & Son in their exhibition of Ming Blue and White Including Dated Examples, no. 74, pp. 102/3, a further example from the Ludwig collection in the Cologne Museum is illustrated by Adele Schlombs in China und die Hoffnung auf Glûck, no. 44.

Yongzheng miniature copper-red vase

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A miniature copper-red vase; Yongzheng. photo Bonhams

Of elegant pear-shaped form, covered all over with a rich mottled red glaze, thinning at the mouth to an opaque white, wood stand. 8.4cm high; Sold for HK$48,000

Provenance :/ Formerly in the collection of Brodie and Enid Lodge

Exhibited 出版: The Oriental Ceramics Society, Monochrome Porcelain of the Ming and Manchu Dynasties, London, October 1948, no.5.

清雍正 紅釉荸薺扁瓶擺件

來源:Brodie 與 Enid Lodge舊藏

Chinese Glass @ Bonhams, Hong Kong

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A rare red glass bottle vase. Yongzheng four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of sumptuous globular form, skilfully moulded with a raised ridge at the shoulder and surmounted by a tall tapering neck, the glass of a rich mottled red colour suffused with bubbles and inclusions. 23cm high. Sold for HK$1,560,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 12 May 1988.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.50-51, no.24
R.Kleiner, Chinese Snuff Bottles in the Collection of Mary & George Bloch, British Museum Press, London, 1995, p.xxi, fig.2

清雍正 透明紅玻璃賞瓶 「雍正年製」楷款

來源:1988年5月12日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

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An extremely rare ruby-red and white overlay glass ‘ruyi’ jar.Qianlong four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of elegant rounded form, springing from an accentuated foot, and tapering to the mouth, the lower overlay of a rich ruby-red colour, finely carved as a stylised peony flower with eight interlocking petals with deftly incised veining, the central body an opaque white colour, the upper overlay carved with ruyi motifs, the lipped rim intricately incised with a four character kaishu mark, original carved wood stand; 8.3cm diam. Estimate: HK$200,000 – 400,000, USD 26,000 – 52,000. Sold for HK$1,320,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 4 November 1986.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, p.99, cat. no.73

R.Kleiner, Chinese Snuff Bottles in the Collection of Mary & George Bloch, British Museum Press, London, 1995, p.xxiii, fig.5

Catalogue of the International Art Fair, New York, March 1997, p.15, cat. no.17

清乾隆 白套紅玻璃蓮瓣紋缽「乾隆年製」楷款

來源: 於1986年11月4日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

Qianlong-reign marked jars of this type are extremely rare, representing the pinnacles of achievement of the Beijing Palace glass workshops. The precise form, quality of the ruyi-design carving, and powerful contrasting colours mark this select group out amongst other Imperial Qing dynasty glass wares. A closely related jar from the Qing court collection, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing, with additional bands in sapphire-blue around the neck and foot, is illustrated in Luster of Autumn Water: Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2005, p. 208, pl. 59

Only one other jar of this type appears to have been offered at auction, a slightly larger (12.5cm diameter) example, sold at Sotheby’s Hong Kong, The Collection of a Parisian Connoisseur, 8 April 2007, lot 519, differing from the current jar in that the four-character mark is inscribed around the base. Another red-overlay jar, formerly in the Robert Clague Collection, and now in the Hong Kong Museum of Art, is illustrated in The Robert H. Clague Collection. Chinese Glass of the Qing Dynasty, Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, 1987, cat. no 18. Another unpublished example is in the collection of the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, England

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A rare ‘amethyst’ glass bottle vase. Yongzheng four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of elegant ‘S’-shaped section, supported on a short straight foot, gently undulating inwards and sloping at the shoulders, surmounted by a narrow curved neck, the glass of an attractive purple colour reminiscent of amethyst. 13.9cm high. Sold for HK$660,000.

Provenance: S.Bernstein & Co., San Francisco, 31 July 1993.

Illustrated 出版: S.Bernstein, Chinese Art from Distant Centuries vol.2, 1993, no.49
A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.48-49, no.23

清雍正 紫玻璃花瓶 「雍正年製」楷款

來源:於1993年7月31日購自三藩市S.Bernstein & Co.

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A rare yellow glass zhadou. Qianlong four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

The heavily constructed body of compressed spherical form supported on a straight foot and flaring out to a broad mouth, the base wheel cut with a four-character mark within a double square; 8cm high. Estimate: HK$50,000 – 80,000, USD 6,400 – 10,000. Sold for HK$504,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 1 May 1987.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, p.89, no.61

清乾隆 黃玻璃渣斗「乾隆年製」楷款

來源:於1987年5月1日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

For a Yongzheng reign-marked fluted yellow glass zhadou in the Beijing Palace Museum, see Luster of Autumn Water. Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2005, p. 132, pl. 11.

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A rare green glass bottle vase.Qianlong four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of compressed spherical form supported on a slightly splayed foot, surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck flared slightly at the mouth, the colour of a rich emerald-green, suffused with bubbles. 21.5cm high. Sold for HK$480,000

Provenance: A & J Speelman Ltd., London, 4 February 1993.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.72-73, no.43

清乾隆 透明綠玻璃扁瓶 「乾隆年製」楷款

來源:於1993年2月4日購自倫敦A & J Speelman Ltd.

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A yellow glass ‘lotus leaf’ water dropper. Qing dynasty, 18th century. photo Bonhams

Of deep rounded form, boldly shaped and carved in relief in the form of a lotus leaf, the exterior carved in relief with luxuriant lotus flowers and stems emanating from the base and extending to the lotus flowers, all carved in relief, the irregular shaped rim folded over to simulate the edges of a lotus leaf, lowered and widened at one side to form a spout, the opposite side carved with a lotus seed pod and two frogs, the lip carved with two small crabs depicted clambering over, the exterior and interior of the vessel decorated with gently incised lines conveying the veins of a lotus leaf.11cm diam.Sold for HK$480,000

Provenance: Spink & Son Ltd, London, 14 April 1989.

Illustrated 出版: Minor Arts of China vol.IV, Spink & Son Ltd., 1989, p.86, fig.111, and illustrated on the front cover
Octagon vol.XXVI, Spink & Son Ltd., 1989, p.14, fig.1
C.Brown & D.Rabiner, Clear As Crystal, Red As Flame: Later Chinese Glass, China House Gallery, China Institute in America, New York, 1990, cat. no.42
A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, p.109, no.84
Triptych: 76, Nov-Dec 1995, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, pg.19, no.2
R.Kleiner,Chinese Snuff Bottles in the Collection of Mary & George Bloch, British Museum Press, London, 1995, p.xix, fig.1
Catalogue of the International Art Fair, New York, March 1997, p.15, cat. no.18

清 十八世紀黃玻璃荷葉形水盂

來源:於1989年4月14日購自倫敦Spink & Son Ltd

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A rare pink glass fluted vase. Yongzheng four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of globular form, supported on a short foot, gently rising at the shoulder and flaring at the neck, skillfully moulded into ten vertical flutes extending from the foot to the rim, the colour of a rich pink mottled with pale white splashes, suffused with bubbles and inclusions. 13cm high. Sold for HK$384,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 29 September 1988.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.52-53, no.25
Glass for K’ang Hsi’s Court, Arts of Asia, Sept-Oct 1991, p.133

清雍正 粉色玻璃十棱盤口瓶「雍正年製」楷款

來源:於1988年9月29日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

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A fine large amber glass vase. Qianlong four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of imposing size, the swollen body supported on a short straight foot, surmounted by a long neck gently flaring at the mouth, the glass of an attractive orange-brown colour. 36cm high. Sold for HK$360,000

Provenance: S.Bernstein & Co., San Francisco, 7 October 1992.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.68-69, no.40

清乾隆 瑪瑙色透明玻璃天球瓶 「乾隆年製」楷款

來源:於1992年10月7日購自三藩市S.Bernstein & Co.

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A large white glass bottle vase.. Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of globular form supported on a short straight foot, surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck, incised and inlaid with gold at the rim with an apocryphal Qianlong seal mark, the white glass of exceptional translucence reminiscent of flawless white jade. 27.6cm high. Sold for HK$336,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 7 January 1991.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.84-85, no.55

清 白玻璃長頸瓶「大清乾隆年製」篆款

來源:於1991年1月7日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

A blue glass vase of similar form, also incised and inlaid in gold with an apocryphal Qianlong seal mark, is illustrated in Elegance and Radiance. Grandeur in Qing Glass. The Andrew K.F. Lee Collection, The Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2000, pl.13.

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A pair of ruby-red carved glass ‘lotus’ cups. Qianlong four-character wheel-cut marks and of the period.. photo Bonhams

Each of deep rounded form, the rich ruby-red glass skilfully carved of undulating petal form, the exterior carved in low relief with a duck amidst luxuriant lotus plants, supported on a root coiling around the foot encircling the mark. 6.2cm high. Sold for HK$312,000
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清乾隆 紅玻璃雕荷塘水鴨杯一對 「乾隆年製」楷款

Qianlong glass vessels inscribed with the reign mark on the base are rare, and these marks appear to have been reserved for the highest quality pieces. For an overlay vase with a Qianlong four-character kaishu mark similarly inscribed around the base, see a red-overlay glass vase from the Qing court collection, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in Luster of Autumn Water. Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2005, p. 202, pl. 55.

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A ruby-red cylindrical glass brush holder. Mid Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of cylindrical form, the rich ruby-red glass carved in relief with a landscape scene of a groom watching a horse rolling on the ground, framed under gnarled pine branches and leaves, the reverse inscribed in xing cao with a seven-column poem, all reminiscent of a bamboo brushpot by the famous bamboo carver Wu Zhifan. 17.8cm high. Sold for HK$204,000.

Provenance: Robyn Turner Gallery, San Francisco, 24 April 1998.

Illustrated 出版: E.B.Curtis, Chinese Glassmaking, Arts of Asia, Nov-Dec 1998, pp.98-107, no.13 & 14

清中期 紅玻璃雕渡銀河筆筒

來源:於1998年4月24日購自三藩市Robyn Turner Gallery

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A monumental ‘clair-de-lune’ glass bottle vase. Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

The exceptionally large vase of compressed globular form supported on a short, slightly splayed foot, surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck, the glass of an attractive opaque pale blue colour. 44cm high. Sold for HK$180,000

Provenance: S.Bernstein & Co., San Francisco, 30 March 1993.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.82-83, no.51
E.B.Curtis, Journal of Glass Studies vol.41, Corning Museum of Glass, 1999, p.152, fig.3

清天藍玻璃長頸瓶

來源:於1993年3月30日購自三藩市S.Bernstein & Co.

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A pair of gilt-decorated glass ‘dragon’ bowls. Guangxu. photo Bonhams

Each of deep rounded form supported on a short foot, intricately decorated in gilt with nine dragons, the interior with two pairs of dragons depicted in pursuit of a flaming pearl around a central writhing dragon, the exterior with an additional two pairs of dragon rendered in a similar design, all against a dense floral ground, all below a collar of ruyi motifs at the rim and above a narrow band of classic scroll at the foot, the base with apocryphal Qianlong mark.16.3cm diam. Sold for HK$168,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 21 November 1988.

清光緒白玻璃畫金彩龍紋碗一對

來源:於1988年11月21日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

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A pair of white glass Moghul-style bowls.18th century. photo Bonhams

Each of shallow rounded form supported on a short straight foot, the exterior intricately carved with registers of overlapping chrysanthemum petals emerging from the base in concentric patterns and rising to the foliate rim. 7 cm high. Sold for HK$156,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 29 September 1988.

Illustrated 出版: R.Kleiner, Chinese Snuff Bottles in the Collection of Mary & George Bloch, British Museum Press, London, 1995, p.xxiii, fig.6-7

十八世紀 白玻璃蓮花形碗一對

來源:於1988年9月29日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

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A turquoise-green glass vase;Qianlong four-character wheel-cut mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

The heavily constructed body of slender curved form, tapering elegantly from the narrow foot to the swollen central body, rising to a long flared neck, the colour of a rich blue-green suffused with black inclusions and striations in imitation of turquoise, the countersunk base wheel cut with a four-character mark within a double square.18.1cm high. Estimate: HK$40,000 – 60,000, USD 5,200 – 7,700. Sold for HK$144,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 30 October 1986.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.80-81, cat. no.50

清乾隆 仿綠松石色玻璃橄欖瓶「乾隆年製」楷款

來源:於1986年10月30日購自三藩市Ashkenazie & Co.

A vase of identical size and shape from the Qing court collection, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing, but in a brilliant ‘sky-blue’, is illustrated in Luster of Autumn Water: Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2005, p. 154, pl. 24. See also a turquoise glass vase illustrated in Elegance and Radiance: Grandeur in Qing Glass. The Andrew K.F. Lee Collection, The Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2000, pl.48.

Dr Alan Feen, a radiation oncologist from Tulsa, Oklahoma, began collecting Chinese glass in 1986 when he purchased his first object, the small Qianlong ruby-red and overlay white brush washer (Lot 208) in San Francisco. Dr Feen had been looking at and studying Chinese glass since a 1983 trip to China, a land he had always wanted to visit. He has now made the decision to let go of the collection for others to enjoy. A second sale of the glass will be held in San Francisco in 2011.

The Alan E. Feen Collection of Chinese Glass
Emily Byrne Curtis

His interest in Chinese glass commenced in 1983. Coincidently this same year also marked the publication of Yang Boda’s seminal study of glass wares from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Working with records of the Workshops of the Imperial Palace (Zaobanchu), Yang was able to chart the course of Imperial glassmaking from the Yongzheng reign (1723-35) to the end of the Xuantong (1909-11) period. However, since records for the Kangxi era (1662-1722) were lacking, little was known about the Imperial glass workshop the emperor had established in 1696.

Fortunately, historical documents in the archives in Rome and the Vatican contained more specific information regarding the founding of the glassworks. They revealed that the workshop itself, was located within the confines of the Imperial City on a piece of land adjacent to the French Jesuits’ church. This proved to be in accordance with two eighteenth century Chinese texts which state that the entire complex was located on the east side of a street named Canchikou. From other documents conserved in the Japonica/Sinica division of the Archivum Romanum Societatis Iesu, we learn from several letters dating to 1696 and written by Jean de Fontaney, SJ (洪若翰 Hong Ruohan), that this glassworks had been erected by Kilian Stumpf, SJ (紀理安 Ji Lian), that it was already producing glass wares. According to the accounts written by Matteo Ripa (馬 國 賢 Ma Guoxian) and housed in the archives of Archivio Storico de Propaganda Fide, in 1711 the glass workshop was still under Stumpf’s direction, and in May 1715 Ripa recorded how Stumpf had built many furnaces for glass making, while attending to the needs of a great number of craftsmen, all of which required his constant attention.

Continuing on, Theodorico Pedrini, CM (德理格De Lige) sent a request to Rome for examples of glass with gold sparkles that shine. Pedrini also added that the glassworks was experiencing difficulties in making this variety. His description brings to mind the copper particles found in aventurine glass. The glass batch for aventurine was in fact, hard to make and nearly impossible to work by blowing. Nonetheless, in 1705 Kangxi presented the military governor of Jiangsu with seventeen pieces of glass among which were two blue vases speckled with gold. All of this reminds one of the vase of transparent blue glass in Dr. Feen’s collection (Lot 216) which contains spangles (pasta stellaria) imitating aventurine. It may be noted further, that similar examples of this type of glass may be found in the collection of the Beijing Palace Museum.

A letter written by Jean-François Foucquet, SJ (傅 聖 澤 Fu Shengze) and preserved in the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana describes in detail the gifts Kangxi was sending to the King of Portugal in 1721. Among the glassware we find descriptions for plates the color of celestial red; cups with flower pattern the color of blue sky after rain (yuguo tianqing); pots and plates in the same shade; plates of sky-blue (tianlan); cups and plates of white glass ornamented with flowers; and five cups of white glass and adorned with gilt on the exterior. The latter description may be compared to a pair of gilt decorated bowls (Lot 219) in the Feen Collection which have a four character mark of the Qianlong emperor (r.1736-95) on their bases, representing a style of decor that can be traced back to the earliest days of Imperial glassmaking.

Foucquet’s references to glass with flower patterns recalls a mention by Lodovico Antonio Appiani, CM (畢 天 祥 Bi Tianxiang), of having been in a room ‘full of young artisans who were carving floral patterns on the glasswares,’ while the distinctions made on Foucquet’s list between vessels of ‘sky-blue’ and the ‘blue sky after rain’ colours impart a distinctive Chinese sensibility. One might suggest that the sky-blue tone is met by the large vase (Lot 228) whose colour has also been referred to as being ‘clair de lune.’ As to the color of ‘blue sky after rain,’ this description was probably derived from that of the mysterious Chai stoneware made during the reign of Emperor Shizong ( r. 953-59) in the Five Dynasties period.

Yongzheng (r.1723-35) is said to have exhibited a pronounced preference for vessels made of bright red and purple glass. The method utilized to achieve these colours is believed to have been transmitted to China in the following manner. Kilian Stumpf had attended the Jesuit college in Mainz where the latest modes to produce ruby glass were known. This process included the addition of colloidal gold (gold dispersed as fine particles) to the glass formula. This technology had been transmitted to China has been confirmed by analytical studies of specimens from the Kangxi and Yongzheng periods which showed that the red, pink, and purple enamel colors employed in decorating porcelain had been prepared from ruby glass which contained colloidal particles of gold. In the absence of documented examples for Foucquet’s ‘celestial red’ glass, one can only propose consideration of vessels such as the vase of transparent red glass (Lot 234) might fit this description, and that its color was obtained by making use of this ‘new’ technology. This reasoning may be applied also to the small bottle vase of transparent amethyst glass (Lot 232), and the fluted vase of opaque pink glass (Lot 231), with incised Yongzheng nian zhi marks in standard script on the slightly recessed bases of both vessels.

The Feen Collection contains some notable examples of glass wares intended for scholarly pursuits such as the brush rest of white glass imitating nephrite, in the form of a crouching boy (Lot 222). Beautifully finished, it was probably intended for the desk of a member of the scholar-literati class, who would have only surrounded themselves with objects of the utmost refinement. Among the other vessels a scholar might have placed on his desk include a brush washer (Lot 205), a brushholder (Lot 204), and a zhadou (Lot 203). The zhadou’s wheel engraved Qianlong nian zhi (1736-95) mark within a double square on the base, combined with the yellow color of the three vessels suggest an attribution to the Qing court, especially when one factors in the yellow glass zhadan bearing a Yongzheng mark, which is in the collection of the Beijing Palace Museum. To this group may be added the brush washer (Lot 208) of opaque ivory colored glass with carved overlays of opaque red and an incised Qianlong mark along the lip of the vessel. This brush washer may be compared to a similar vessel in the Hong Kong Museum of Art.

A commonly held view postulates that the overall quality of Imperial glassmaking began to decline in the last quarter of the eighteenth century and that thereafter, nothing of any noteworthy significance was produced. The pair of covered cups in the Feen Collection (Lot 220) challenges this assumption. The transparent amber color glass is of the highest quality, as are the well-engraved Jiajing marks (1796-1819) on both lids and bases.

In some respects the snuff bottle (Lot 221) of transparent blue glass may be seen as complementing the cycle of Imperial glassmaking which started in Kangxi’s reign. Carved in facets, the gem-like colour of the bottle suggests the minerals are emerald or aquamarine. Though bearing a Tongzhi mark (1862-74), it evokes the single known marked piece of Kangxi glass in the collection of the Beijing Palace Museum, a waterpot fashioned of faceted, transparent glass intended to evoke the clarity of crystal.

It is perhaps fitting to conclude these thoughts on the Feen Collection by referring to the tribute to Stumpf made by João Mourão, SJ ( 穆 敬 遠 Mu Jingyuan), which said in essence, that the Reverend Father Kilian Stumpf taught the two arts of making glass and enamel colours. Moreover he taught the construction of making ovens and small kilns, a knowledge that the Chinese ‘today in their ingenious manner use to fashion very curious objects,’ (fazem Hoje obras muito curiozas).

自1986年開始,俄克拉荷馬放射腫瘤學家Dr. Alan Feen便收藏中國玻璃,他的第一件玻璃收藏品便是購自三藩市的白套紅玻璃蓮花瓣紋缽(Lot 208)。1983年中國之旅啟蒙了他對玻璃的興趣,使他愛不釋手。現在他決定把收藏公諸同好,第二部份的玻璃收藏將會在2010年三藩市拍賣。


Emily Byrne Curtis

 

他自1983年便開始對玻璃感興趣,無獨有偶,這一年也是楊伯達先生出版有關清代(1644-1911)玻璃的研究。透過翻閱造辦處檔案,楊伯達先生追尋出雍正(1723-35)至宣統年間(1909-11)御製玻璃的發展軌跡。可是,由於康熙年間(1662-1722)的記錄有所散缺,只能得知很少有關1696年成立玻璃造辦處的資料。

幸運地,羅馬及梵蒂岡歷史文獻記錄了更多詳細的成立造辦處資料。據資料顯示,造辦處建立在故宮內連接在法國耶穌會教堂的空地之上。這剛好對應了18世紀中文文獻所言,整項建築設立在蚕池口以東。在Archivum Romanum Societatis Iseu 內東方部門的其他文獻裡,我們從數封洪若翰在1696年所寫的信件中得知,紀理安在當時已建立造辦處並製作玻璃器。根據現藏在Archivio Storico de Propaganda Fide馬國賢的記錄,1711年的玻璃造辦處仍是在紀理安的帶領下運作,在1715年5月,馬國賢更記錄了紀理安如何修建多個窯爐作玻璃燒製之用、照顧了眾多工匠的需要,這一切一切也少不了紀理安的長期關注。

其後,德理格向羅馬提出取如金般閃耀的飾片玻璃樣本,他更表示造辦處正試驗製造不同形式的玻璃器。他的描述令人聯想起在灑金星玻璃中的銅微粒。事實上,製作灑金星玻璃是一件不容易的事,幾乎不可以用吹的方式來製造。然而,在1705年康熙皇帝賞賜了江蘇將領十七件玻璃,其中兩件便是帶有閃閃發光飾片的藍玻璃瓶。這些都使人想起Dr. Feen珍藏中其中一件收藏(Lot 216),該器含有閃閃發光的飾片,模仿出灑金星效果,同類例子也可從北京故宮博物院收藏中找到。

現藏Biblioteca Apostolica Vatocana的傅聖潭信件,仔細地形容了康熙皇帝在1721年贈予葡萄牙皇帝的貢品。當中玻璃器包括:天霞紅的碟子、飾花卉紋的雨過天青杯、相同顏色的鍋和碟、天藍碟、飾花卉紋白杯碟以及飾金彩白杯五件。最後一項貢品可與Dr. Feen珍藏中白玻璃畫金彩龍紋碗一對(Lot 219)作比較,這也代表了早期御製玻璃的風格。

傅聖潭信件中提到擁有花卉紋的玻璃器,使人聯想到畢天祥的描述:曾經在「很多年輕工匠們正雕花卉紋玻璃」的房間;而傅聖潭資料中「天藍」和「雨過天青」則表示出特殊的中國品味。一般認為「天藍」色可與天藍玻璃長頸瓶(Lot 228)對照,也就是 “clair de lune”。而「雨過天青」色,很有可能是來自一件屬於五代遼世宗(r. 953-59)時期的柴石器。

雍正皇帝(r. 1723-35)曾說過會展示出他尤其愛好的亮紅和紫色的玻璃瓶。相信是透過以下方法來達到這兩種色彩效果:紀理安曾上德國美因茨耶穌會學校,那裡正是製造最新紅玻璃的地方。過程包括在玻璃配方中加上金(被溶化成粒狀的金屬)。從康熙及雍正時期的瓷器可以證明,此技術是入口到中國的,用於飾瓷器上的紅、粉及紫色琺瑯就是來自擁有金的紅玻璃中提煉出來的。在沒有文件例子去證明傅聖潭的「天霞紅」之下,唯說清雍正透明紅玻璃賞瓶(Lot 234)是配合傅聖潭的描述,而這樣的顏色正是透過利用「新」技術而做的。此原因也可以解釋紫玻璃花瓶(Lot 232)和刻有「雍正年製」楷款的粉色玻璃十棱盤口瓶(Lot 231)的原起。

Dr. Feen珍藏之中也有不少珍貴的文房賞玩,如白玻璃童子形筆擱(Lot 222)。如此精美的瑰寶,顯然是文人雅士之物,因為他們對自身用品常有美學上的追求。除此之外,文人還會在桌上放上筆洗(Lot 205)、筆筒(Lot 204)及渣斗(Lot 203)。渣斗上刻「乾隆年製」雙框款,配合黃色的玻璃,表示出很有可能是皇室御製,當我們看到北京故宮博物院也有藏雍正款黃玻璃時,以上的說法更見明顯。白套紅玻璃蓮花瓣紋缽(Lot 208)也可列入此類文房賞玩,其口緣部份也刻有「乾隆年製」款,同類例子可參考在香港藝術館藏品中找到。

習慣地假定御製玻璃到十八世紀後期進入衰退期,以後更沒有特色的玻璃器生產。Feen珍藏中仿瑪瑙透明玻璃蓋杯一對(Lot 220)挑戰了此想法。此瑪瑙色質量甚高,蓋杯上帶有工整「嘉慶年製」款。

清同治透明藍玻璃鼻煙壺(Lot 211)可說是對自康熙年間開始的御製玻璃系統作了一個保充。此鼻煙壺呈多面體,有如綠寶藍寶般。同是同治年製的玻璃製器,可參見北京故宮博物院藏仿水晶透明玻璃水盂。

或許,我們可以借穆敬遠給予紀理安的感謝辭來總結以上對Feen珍藏的聯想,尊敬的紀理安引進了玻璃製作及琺瑯彩,而且,他教授了如何建造爐及窯,是一種「巧妙地製作新奇物件」的知識。

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A pair of large pink glass bottle vases.Qing dynasty, 17th-18th century. photo Bonhams

Each with a sumptuous globular body flattened to comprise four distinct sides, supported on a short splayed foot and surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck, the colour of an opaque pale pink.25cm high. Sold for HK$132,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 1 May 1987.

Illustrated 出版: E.B.Curtis, Chinese Glassmaking, Arts of Asia, Nov-Dec 1998, pp.98-107

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A rare white glass ‘recumbent boy’ brushrest. Qing dynasty, 17th-18th century. photo Bonhams

Naturalistically moulded as a recumbent boy depicted supporting his head on his hands, with an enhanced curve on his long stylised back comprising a support for a brush, the colour of a brilliant opaque white. 11.9cm long. Sold for HK$66,000 

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 30 October 1986.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, p.44, no.18
C.Brown & D.Rabiner, Clear As Crystal, Red As Flame: Later Chinese Glass, China House Gallery, China Institute in America, New York, 1990, cat. no.5
Glass for K’ang Hsi’s Court, Arts of Asia, Sept-Oct 1991, p.132

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A rare ruby-red and yellow glass ‘twin fish’ pendant. Qianlong. photo Bonhams

Skilfully moulded and shaped as two fish, one yellow, the other ruby-red, interlinked at opposite end of each other.5.8cm long. Sold for HK$60,000

Provenance: A & J Speelman Ltd., London, 16 June 1987.

The workmanship on this pendant is reminiscent of that on a Qianlong mark and period glass fish snuff bottle in the Palace Museum, illustrated in Luster of Autumn Water. Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2005, p. 221, pl. 66. See also a red glass tortoise-shaped paperweight, illustrated ibid, pg. 313, pl.137.

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A facetted glass ‘aquamarine’ snuff bottle.Tongzhi four-character wheel-cut four-character mark and of the period. photo Bonhams

Of octagonal facetted form surmounted by a short cylindrical neck, the colour of a brilliant blue-green tone reminiscent of aquamarine, the Mongolian-style stopper inlaid with turquoise and other semi-precious stones.7.1cm high.Sold for HK$57,600

Provenance:Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 5 December 1987.

Illustrated 出版:A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, p.122, no.99

For a closely related Daoguang reign-marked glass snuff bottle, see A Treasury of Chinese Snuff Bottle: The Mary and George Bloch Collection, Volume 5, Hong Kong, 2002, Treasury no. 812, p.314-315.

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A pair of amber glass bowls and covers.Qing dynasty.. photo Bonhams

Each of deep rounded form supported on a short pronounced foot, the cover of domed form surmounted by a prominent ring, the base and interior of the cover carved in relief with apocryphal Jiaqing mark, the colour of a rich orange-brown. 8.3cm high. Sold for HK$54,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 12 January 1987.

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A blue glass ‘aventurine-imitation’ bottle vase.Qing dynasty, 18th century. photo Bonhams

The globular body supported on a short foot and surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck, of a rich blue colour enhanced with irregular splashes of sparkling metal particles in imitation of aventurine. 19cm high. Sold for HK$50,400

Provenance: A & J Speelman Ltd., London, 12 January 1987.

Illustrated 出版: C.Brown & D.Rabiner, Clear As Crystal, Red As Flame: Later Chinese Glass, China House Gallery, China Institute in America, New York, 1990, cat. no.28
Glass for K’ang Hsi’s Court, Arts of Asia, Sept-Oct 1991, p.133
A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.64-65, no.36
E.B.Curtis, Notes on Qing Glassmaking, Journal of Glass Studies vol.39, Corning Museum of Glass 1997, no. 2
E.B.Curtis, A Plan of the Emperor’s Glassworks, Arts Asiatiques tome 56-2001, p.86, fig.6
E.B.Curtis, Pure Brightness Shines Everywhere: The Glass of China, Ashgate, 2004, p.64, fig.7.4

Aventurine glass was made in seventeenth century Venice and later in other European glasshouses. Gold-flecked blue glass is mentioned in the Palace records in Beijing as early as 1705.

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A yellow glass brushwasher.Qing dynasty, 18th century. photo Bonhams

Of compressed spherical form rising from a subtly indented foot, the glass of a rich orange-yellow colour. 12.7cm diam.Sold for HK$48,000

Provenance: S.Bernstein & Co., San Francisco, 18 May 1992.

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A blue glass ‘chilong’ vase.Qing dynasty, 18th century. photo Bonhams

Of elegant pear-shaped form, the sumptuous body rising gently to a tall cylindrical neck, supported on a splayed foot, boldly carved in relief with a pair of chilong dragons depicted clambering around the body, the colour of a rich cobalt-blue. 19.7cm high.Sold for HK$33,600

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 16 June 1986.

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An ‘aquamarine’ glass vase. Mid Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of globular form supported on a flared foot and surmounted by a tall tapering neck, the colour of a vivid blue-green reminiscent of aquamarine. 17.9 cm high. Sold for HK$36,000

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 8 December 1987.

Illustrated 出版: A Chorus of Colors, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, pp.74-75, no.44

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A yellow glass brush holder.Qing Dynasty, 18th century. photo Bonhams

Of cylindral form with well-formed sides rising vertically from the foot, the colour of an attractive orange-yellow colour. 15.7cm high. Sold for HK$28,800

Provenance: S.Bernstein & Co., San Francisco, 15 June 1993.

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A rare yellow glass facetted bowl.Mid Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of deep rounded form supported on a short foot and flaring out at the rim, the sides shaped into twelve distinct vertical facets, the colour of a rich yellow colour. 11cm diam.Sold for HK$26,400

Provenance: Robyn Turner Gallery, San Francisco, 14 January 1997.

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An emerald-green glass bottle vase. Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of sumptuous globular form, surmounted by a tall cylindrical neck and supported on a splayed foot, the colour of a brilliant translucent emerald-green, the base incised with an apocryphal Qianlong four-character mark. 19cm high. Sold for HK$26,400

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 30 October 1986.

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A rare white glass two-handled cup. Late Ming/early Qing dynasty. photo Bonhams

Of deep tapering form supported on a high foot, moulded at the sides with a pair of handles formed from stylised dragon heads, carved in relief on each side with a shou character between two medallions, the colour of an opaque white. 5.4cm high. Sold for HK$6,600

Provenance: Ashkenazie & Co., San Francisco, 12 May 1988

chinese imperial  for euro

 

chine_de_commande_petit_plat_rond_decor_dit_la_tonnelle_1317911676933100

 

Chine de commande. Petit plat rond à décor dit à la Tonnelle. XVIIIe siècle. Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris

 

en émaux de la famille rose d’après une gravure de Cornelis Pronk : une femme, ses servantes et des enfants sont assis dans un paysage sous une tonnelle, sur l’aile douze réserves décorées de papillons et d’insectes alternés de fleurs sur fond de quadrillage vert agrémentés de rinceaux et coquilles en rouge de fer. D.26 cm – Estimation : 800 / 1 000 €

 

chine_plat_rond_decore_en_grisaille_une_scene_centrale_1317911677131405

 

Chine. Plat rond décoré en grisaille . XVIIIe siècle. Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris

 

d’une scène centrale représentant une allégorie de mariage dans un temple à colonnades surmontées d’armoiries, avec au premier plan naïades et tritons. Il porte l’inscription latine sur la façade « Semper Amor Pro Te Firmisimus Atque Fidelis ». Rinceaux dorés sur l’aile. Restaurations sur l’aile. D.35 cm – Estimation : 800 / 1 000 €

 

chine_de_commande_plat_creux_rectangulaire_1317911679862234

 

Chine de commande, plat creux rectangulaire à pans coupés. Fin de la période Kangxi (1662-1722). Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris

 

décoré dans la palette Imari de branches fleuries et de quadrillages dans des réserves. L. 35,5 cm. Estimation : 800 / 1 000 €

 

chine_plat_creux_rectangulaire_pans_coupes_1317911678205189

 

Chine. Plat creux rectangulaire à pans coupés. XVIIIe siècle. Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris

 

décoré en émaux de la famille rose de feuillages et de fleurs. .L. 32 cm – Estimation : 600 / 800 €

 

chine_assiette_ronde_decoree_1317911677999267

 

Chine . Assiette ronde décorée en émaux de la famille rose des blasons des huit provinces des Pays-Bas. XVIIIe siècle. Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris

 

encadrant une armoirie centrale surmontée d’une couronne et d’une tête de cheval ailée. Rinceaux fleuris dorés sur l’aile. Une égrenure. D.23 cm. Estimation : 600 / 800 €

 

chine_assiette_octogonale_131791167861933

 

Assiette octogonale. XVIIIe siècle. Photo Pescheteau-Badin – Paris 

 

Décor en émaux de la famille rose d’un chiffre entouré de fleurs. Egrenure. D.22 cm – Estimation : 300 / 350 €

 

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